words

Wayne Mills Band Releases New Single

Alabama-based Wayne Mills Band will release their first single, "She Knows the Words to Every Song," to radio August 16. Mills co-wrote the track to be featured on his new album, Long Hard Road, which will mark the first project for new Nashville record label Diesel Records.  "She Knows the Words to Every Song" will also be available on Itunes and www.waynemillsband.com August 16. Seasoned producer, Denny Diante, produced the track for the label's flagship artist.

"This song is a reflection of the emotions anyone, who works out of a suitcase, may go through while they are away from the one they love," says Mills. "My wife has been my biggest support system through the years and I wanted to express to her what she means to me and how I can't wait for us to just getaway with 'She Knows the Words to Every Song.'"

--

Wayne Mills Band

Wayne Mills will soon release his 7th studio album, Long Hard Road, where he worked with powerhouse producer Denny Diante under new Nashville record label, Diesel Records. Mills, a native of Arab, AL, showcases his versatility as a singer/songwriter with tracks including “I Need the Country, Whiskey Bent and Jail Bound” and the title track “Long Hard Road” which tells the lonesome tale of a man making bad decisions and working through the consequences. With more than fifteen years of touring experience under his belt, Wayne has proved himself the consummate performer with a huge following in the Southeast while gaining influence in other markets.  This outlaw's traditional country style blended with an edgy rock sound will please new and old country music fans alike with Long Hard Road. His music is the soundtrack to his life: leaving no stone unturned when it comes to lyrics and his life.

The Saw Doctors at the Boulder Theater - 03.21.11

KGNU & The Boulder Weekly are proud to present The Further Adventures of The Saw Doctors at the Boulder Theater on Monday, March 21st, 2011.


The Saw Doctors are known in Ireland for ridiculously catchy songs and for rocking the road week after week from Galway to Melbourne—and, come March 2011, from New York to Las Vegas. They’ve hopped up countless crowds, including at two inaugurations of Maryland governor Martin O’Malley, with upbeat anthems to everyday people.

A fun-loving reputation precedes the band thanks to their zany hit “I Useta Lover” or the recent sneak Irish radio chart-topper, “Red Cortina A Cappella.” But it belies a more reflective side with deep roots, a side sometimes forgotten even by the group’s biggest fans.

“That one-sided perception of the band haunts us, even in our hometown here in Western Ireland,” chuckles Saw Doctors singer and guitarist Leo Moran. “A few months ago, in a pub here, I sang one of my favorite songs, 'Same Oul Town', the title track of our third album.  It's about a small town in winter, where everyone knows everyone else's business. Another local singer, who has known us forever, came up and told me, 'That's a lovely song; you should record that!'"

Bittersweet portraits of everyday people and the landscape that surrounds them are what the band does best. The Saw Doctors have a Springsteen-like ability to get at the poignant perspectives of ordinary folks: the lovesick pub regular, the guys on the corner, the wise old woman who greeted all comers with a slice of bread and butter.

This ability flows from the roving group’s strong ties to Tuam—and to the lives and stories of the people in it. It’s a town of wits and eccentrics, folks like cartoon artist Squigley McHugh, who humorously sketched the Saw Doctors as superheroes for their stage backdrop. Tuam is known for its gregarious, sometimes overly curious conversationalists. It’s a place where people still pop down to the pub in the afternoon, looking for a pint and a good gossip.

But don’t be surprised if you can’t make out a word: Tuam, explains Moran, has its own secret code, a slang and a love of peculiar turns of phrase incomprehensible to outsiders. “In Tuam, there’s a great interest in language and words. A lot of the Travellers, itinerant Irish traders and tin-smiths, settled around Tuam and had their own language they used while trading. We’ve adopted it as core citizens of the town.”

Tuam’s citizens relish slang and constantly invent new words. Expressions like “Well-Byes,” the greeting of choice among young guys in jogging suits, speak volumes: “you know where you are and you’re from Tuam,” Moran says. Soccer players use local slang when playing against other towns to keep their next moves under wraps (as the band recounts in “All the Way from Tuam”).

Yet words, like the band itself, have a far more winsome side, connecting people with their history and the land. In “Friday Town,” the Anglicized place-names in the chorus hint at a lost Irish past, as Moran sings of people long gone, either overseas to America or to their graves. “When you study the names in Irish, they carry meanings, some feature in the landscape or the memory of something that happened there,” Moran notes. “But all these lovely meanings have been lost. We’re trying to celebrate them, as well as the people who left forever for the States, on an epic, courageous journey.”

More introspective moments still ring with bright guitars, catchy melodies, and upbeat energy, which make The Saw Doctors shows fun, even at their deepest. Sometimes when playing live around Ireland, the exuberant singing from the audience has nearly drowned out the band. The group loves to drop their vocals out altogether, providing only instrumental accompaniment for the chorus of enthusiastic fans, who seem to know every song by heart.

The down-to-earth feel—and the Tuam wit—have universal appeal. “People sometimes say that a song about Tuam or Galway or Ireland won’t matter to people abroad. That’s like telling Bruce Springsteen that he is wasting his time writing about the Jersey Shore,” Moran reflects. “Songs are about sharing feelings and emotions and ideas. If you have ideas and emotions that people can relate to, then it works no matter where you play.”

--

Tickets are on sale at Boulder Theater Box Office. Call (303) 786-7030 for tickets by phone.

Tickets are also available through our website @ www.bouldertheater.com.

Tickets are On Sale Now!

$20 GA

+ $2 for under 21 ticket buyers

FRANK SINATRA: BEST OF VEGAS

In the span of a few years, Las Vegas refueled Frank Sinatra’s career and Sinatra in turn became the lead figure in the city’s ascendance. It was a synergistic relationship that has since become legendary in the annals of 20th century entertainment.

Some of the finest moments in that legendary symbiosis are captured in Frank Sinatra: Best of Vegas, a series of live recordings set for release on Concord Records on February 15, 2011. The 14-song set, under license from Frank Sinatra Enterprises (FSE), captures Sinatra in concert at the Sands, Caesars Palace and the Golden Nugget in Las Vegas between 1961 and 1987. The collection is a distillation of highlights from Sinatra: Vegas, the five-disc boxed set (4 CD/1 DVD) of live recordings released by Reprise Records in 2006.

“From his debut at the Desert Inn in September 1951, no entertainer was ever more synonymous with the city of Las Vegas than Frank Sinatra,” says Charles Pignone, author of The Sinatra Treasures, in his comprehensive liner notes to the Best of Vegas CD. “It has been said that next to legalized gambling, nothing has been more beneficial and profitable to Las Vegas than Frank Sinatra.”

All the Sinatra classics are here, performed live before adoring crowds at some of the most prestigious venues in the history of Vegas. “The Lady Is a Tramp” (The Sands, 1961); “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” (The Sands, 1966); “All or Nothing at All” (Caesars Palace, 1982); “Pennies From Heaven” (The Golden Nugget, 1987); and of course, the “Theme From New York, New York” (Caesars Palace, 1982) are just some of the gems in the Best of Vegas collection.

“If you were in Las Vegas at the same time as Sinatra, there was nothing else that could compare,” says Pignone. “Even when the entertainment in town was changing from headliners to magic and production shows, Sinatra was still the ‘main event.’”

Or in the words of Las Vegas Mayor Oscar B. Goodman, Sinatra was “the destination’s most enduring icon, an inimitable original who was influential in shaping Las Vegas’ image and entertainment scene.”

Sinatra returned to Vegas in December with the opening of Sinatra Dance With Me, at the Wynn Las Vegas. Conceived, choreographed and directed by Twyla Tharp, Sinatra Dance With Me features original recorded masters of Frank Sinatra with a big band and 14 of the world’s finest dancers.


--

TRACK LIST
Introduction
The One I Love Belongs to Somebody Else
Moonlight in Vermont
The Lady Is a Tramp
I’ve Got You Under My Skin
Street Of Dreams
Fly Me to the Moon (In Other Words)
Monologue
Luck Be a Lady
I Can’t Get Started
Without a Song
All or Nothing at All
Witchcraft
Pennies From Heaven
Angel Eyes
Theme From New York, New York
Bows

Citizen Cope at the Fox Theatre - January 1, 2011

"Something is great about this one." The phrase buzzed around in my head, mixing with the endorphins that cracked and snapped about their different relays, telling me that I liked this music. This music is good. The beer in your hand is good.* You are loving this, aren't you? Aren't you?

Singer/Song Writer, Citizen Cope recently headlined in Towson's Recher Theatre, a large dimly lit room washed in blood red drapes. Two bars, bouncers at the door who think they're funny, an entrance covered in music posters: enough ambiance to make you dream of owning rooms filled with nothing but silk pillows and feathery boas. Brilliance -- all of it.

His music is simple to the point of being stripped down, as if bearing it all was the only way to get our attention. The Spartan band behind him was made up of a drummer, a bassist, two keyboardists, and Cope on guitar. A mix of hip-hop, folk, and blues his songs are mostly beats - mix bass drum, high hat, snare, clap track and repeat - buffed smooth by a haggard, road-weary voice. Uncommon chords for texture and keyboards for lift.

One Rolling Stone critic called him "a modern day bluesman who paints a plaintive portrait of the human condition." Another, not-so-friendly critic from music and culture website, SoundtheSirens said: "I'm sure there's some soulful guy with a guitar who can write better songs sitting in some coffee shop somewhere who deserves the exposure more than he does." This may be warranted, I just happen to disagree.

Good artists can recreate the high people get from good music -- that electricity that makes the crowd sway. After all, that heightened sense, so amazingly replicable across cultures, is what makes music a universal human constant. But the excitement that surrounds great artists -- painters, musicians, writers, and doers alike -- is that you as if you are in the presence of someone who is saying what no else is able to or willing to say. I felt the unsettling electricity in Cope's performance -- the feeling that I could not do this, nor would I ever want to. Who could bear being the only one for long? There's something great about this one.

This line of thinking is flawed. I argue that Citizen Cope is great, but that just makes him great to me. To you he could be anything or nothing. But he got a reaction out of me, a departure from normalcy that left me buzzing afterwards, and it's hard to find words that aren't useless contemplation. Words that avoid shameless worship to someone who does not want to be worshipped. But I knew I was doomed to fail when I started this.

Tickets are on sale at Fox Theatre Box Office. Call (303) 443-3399 for tickets by phone.

Tickets are also available through our website @ www.foxtheatre.com.

$25 adv / $25 dos

Tickets On Sale – Friday December 17th!

Infantree Instigate Cockfight in “Mourning Glory”

Three-fourths of California quartet Infantree may still be under 21, but with their startlingly sophisticated songwriting chops and lush vocal harmonies the young musicians are already composing timeless music.  Signed to Vapor Records (Jonathan Richman, Everest, Tegan & Sara), the prolific band has released both an EP and a full-length this year.  The latter of which, titled Would Work, will be re-released in early March with extra tracks and a bonus disc of video content.  Neil Young also invited the guys to perform at this year’s Bridge School Benefit alongside artists like Elvis Costello, Emmylou Harris, Modest Mouse, and Grizzly Bear.

With three songwriting members that take turns on lead vocals, Infantree have no true frontman.  As a result, their highly collaborative approach creates a unique chemistry and the details of each of their songs are masterfully tailored.  It also allows for a diverse set of influences to find their way into the band’s music.  The band weaves in sun-soaked Americana, intricate baroque pop, dreamy psychedelia, and infectious Spanish melodies, to name a few.

The group has made a video for Would Work track “Mourning Glory.”  The song slyly and seamlessly shifts between a forlorn, banjo-driven section and a wistful Latin-flavored groove.  If you haven’t seen the video yet, click HERE to watch the boys don chicken suits and duke it out in a human cockfight.

Infantree’s attention to detail covers all aspects of the band, from consistently churning out charming videos for their songs to the band name itself.  The guys explain the metaphor behind the name “Infantree” in their own words here:

"Trees are carbon dioxide reducing, erosion preventing, oxygen producing, majestic, and sturdy life-forms that grow with their environment - not in spite of it (like industrial-age humans). Infantree is a symbol for growth. Whether it be intellectual, spiritual, physical, or emotional; growth is growth. If left unchecked, exponential growth could devour prosperity as we know it. Only when it's applied within a means does growth reach it's true potential of ceaseless sustanability. Infantree applies this method by way of harmony, like-mindedness, and an articulation of each indvidual's role/capacity as a musician/human-being. At the same time the use of childlike reckless abandon seems key to wading through the water-mark left by the mainstream mindset. This dynamic has helped the members of Infantree to spread their roots as friends while simultaneously growing as a band."