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Four-Piece Drink Up Buttercup to Drop First Full-Length

Philadelphia pop quartet Drink Up Buttercup will release their first full-length album, Born and Thrown on a Hook, on March 23rd through Yep Roc Records.
Drink Up Buttercup earned the attention of fans with the release of their debut 7” Sosey & Dosey on Kanine Records, which was described as “Beatle-esque but in a kitchen sink kind of way,” (Brooklyn Vegan) and “60’s psychedelic carnival” (Stereogum). The band – comprised of Jim Harvey (vocals, guitar), Ben Money (bass, organ), Mike Cammarata (drums) and Farzad Houshiarnejad
(keyboards) – furthered their notoriety through their bombastic live shows with The New York Times going so far to say that the band “mesmerizes and clobbers live.”
Drink Up Buttercup’s first full album navigates a surrealistic geography somewhere between the grittiness of a Tom Waits’ song and the fairy tales of Han Christian Anderson. Produced by Philadelphia’s own Bill Moriarty (Dr. Dog, Man Man) and mixed by Rusty Santos (Animal Collective, Owen Pallett, Panda Bear), Born and Thrown on a Hook demonstrates a preoccupation with flawed protagonists, drunks and star-crossed lovers.
“We knew we were making something great and we all fought about what added to the greatness and what detracted,” Moriarty said. “We tried every way possible to make recordings: live, one at a time, analog tape, computer... in the end all of them worked and none was the solution.”
“This is an album I'm glad to have been a part of,” Moriarty continued. “It was a powerful experience with all the attractive and repellent parts of being alive rolled up in it.”
In anticipation of Born and Thrown on a Hook, Drink Up Buttercup is releasing a live video document of every song on the upcoming album each week via www.drinkupbuttercup.com, culminating on March 23rd. Each video is stripped of studio trickery & audio comfort zones, embracing the strange surroundings they find themselves in - basements filled with balloons, children’s playgrounds and old folks homes.

Devil Makes Three front man Pete Bernhard books solo gigs

After opening for Sea Sick Steve in NYC last week, Pete’s solo performances are a far bit different from his primary band but one key element remains the same - his defining vocal style, unique phrasing and his distinctive point of view.
 


devil-makes-threeAll the while, The Devil Makes Three "Do Wrong Right" continues to gain momentum.   After selling out shows all across the country via word of mouth from fans and friends, Do Wrong Right garners its 16th straight week on in the Top 10 of the Billboard Bluegrass Charts and the album continues to sell strongly each week.  The album holds steadily in heavy rotation on the college charts along with charting on the Americana/Jamband Chart.

Check out The Devil Makes Three LIVE on KEXP Performing "Do Wrong Right."  The Devil Makes Three Live @ KEXP was released digitally on 8.11. The EP includes four tracks played live in the studio of the famous Seattle based radio station and an interview.

The Devil Makes Three kicks off their Fall tour with gigs at Bumbershoot and Earthdance Peace Festival.

The Devil Makes Three quite possibly are the best band that you have never heard of. Constantly on tour, selling out dates across the country and in their neck of the woods on the West Coast, this band is busy packing their shows night after night, largely thanks to word of mouth.

Over the past 7 years, The Devil Makes Three have garnered fans the old school way - playing a city, making friends, conquering fans and moving on. When they hit the next town, venues are packed with folks that heard from a friend in a city that the band had played before.

Because of this, The Devil Makes Three have established thousands of die-hard and devout fans.

 


 
PETE BERNHARD SOLO DATES
September 15- Blue Lamp- Sacramento, CA
September 16- Rickshaw Shop, San Francisco, CA
September 17- The Crepe Place- Santa Cruz, CA
September 18- Café Coda, Chico, CA
September 19th- Stillwater, Ashland, OR


 
DEVIL MAKES THREE TOUR DATES!
September 5 - Truckee River Park Amphitheater - Truckee, CA
Sept 7th - Bumbershoot Festival - Seattle, WA
Sept 27 - Earthdance Peace Festival - Black Oak Ranch - Laytonville, CA
Oct 14 - Brick By Brick - San Diego, CA
Oct 15 - Echoplex - Los Angeles, CA
Oct 16 - Downtown Brewing Company - San Luis Opisbo, CA
Oct 17 - The Catalyst - Santa Cruz, CA
Oct 18 - The Phoenix Theater - Petaluma, CA
Oct 21 - The Historic Ashland Armory - Ashland, OR
Oct 22 - WOW Hall - Eugene, OR
Oct 23 - Wonder Ballroom - Portland, OR
Oct 24 - El Corazon - Seattle, WA
Nov 7 - Middle East Upstairs - Cambridge, MA

Old Man Winter Blues & Brew Fest Heats Up the Frozen North

After a month of 25 and 35 below temperatures, North Dakota was treated to a tropical warm up of monstrous musical proportions.  Last weekend, the Hub Entertainment Complex hosted an all day indoor festival on two stages: The intimate Cadillac Ranch stage and the bigger, more open Venue stage.

The Bridge Ride 'Blind Man's Hill' Coast To Coast On Winter Tour

The Bridge- for the Grateful Web

Baltimore's favorite sons, The Bridge, head out for a 30-city, coast-to-coast, U.S tour this month that stretches through the end of February. The band begins with dates in the mid-Atlantic region before heading south for shows in Alabama, Louisiana and Texas, next making a full run up the West Coast to Washington before winding down to Colorado. The Bridge are touring behind Blind Man's Hill, their brand new album on Hyena Records.  The 12-track collection hit number seven this week on Americana Radio chart, while the six piece unit is coming off a sold out New Year's Eve show with the Rebirth Brass Band in Baltimore. After playing numerous summer festivals last year, as well as dates with Mike Gordon, Little Feat and Dark Star Orchestra, The Bridge have a growing word-of-mouth buzz based on word of their incendiary live performances. But while The Bridge's sets are often laced with fierce improvisations that touch on numerous corners of American roots music, it's the songwriting of founding members Cris Jacobs and Kenny Liner, resonating with odes to honey bees, poison wine and lives born to ramble, that is the cornerstone to their antique charm.

Upcoming tour dates for The Bridge are:

January 21 / Dante's / Frostburg, MD
January 22 / Club Cafe / Pittsburgh, PA
January 23 / The V Club / Huntington, WV
January 24 / 123 Pleasant Street / Morgantown, WV
January 28 / The Lantern / Blacksburg, VA
January 29 / Boone Saloon / Boone, NC
January 30 / Smith's Olde Bar / Atlanta, GA
January 31 / Mellow Mushroom / Tuscaloosa, AL
February 4 / The Blue Nile / New Orleans, LA
February 5 / Cactus Music / Houston, TX (Free In-Store)
February 5 / The Continental / Houston, TX
February 6 / House Of Blues / Dallas, TX
February 7 / Stubb's BBQ / Austin, TX
February 10 / Winston's / San Diego, CA
February 11 / The Mint / Los Angeles, CA
February 12 / Don Quixote's / Santa Cruz, CA
February 13 / The Hopmonk Tavern / Sebastapol, CA
February 14 / Boom Boom Room / San Francisco, CA
February 15 / Sweetwater / Mill Valley, CA
February 17 / Humboldt Brews / Arcata, CA
February 18 / Indigo / Eugene, OR (w/ JFJO)
February 19 / The Goodfoot / Portland, OR
February 20 / The Wild Buffalo / Bellingham, WA
February 21 / Tost Lounge / Seattle, WA
February 22 / John's Alley / Moscow, ID
February 23 / John's Alley / Moscow, ID
February 24 / Top Hat / Missoula, MT
February 26 / Hodi's Half Note / Fort Collins, CO
February 27 / Quixote's / Denver, CO
February 28 / B-Side Lounge / Boulder, CO

The Bridge's 'Blind Man's Hill' + Tour Dates

The Bridge''s Blind Man''s Hill- for the Grateful Web

Hailing from Baltimore, Maryland, THE BRIDGE are a defiant reminder that B-more is south of the Mason-Dixon line. The band cooks up a stew of New Orleans rhythm & blues, high & lonesome country pickin' and earthy Southern roots spiked with lyrics that romanticize locomotives, poison wine, hurricanes and carnival barkers. Check it out their new album Blind Man's Hill and you'll be a believer too. They will celebrate the new long-player with a hometown release party and performance on November 26 at Ram's Head Live. In January '09, they hit the highway for a cross-country U.S. tour.

The Bridge | Tour Dates

  • December 4 / The Double Door Inn / Charlotte, NC
  • December 5 / The Pour House / Charleston, SC
  • December 6 / Berkley Cafe / Raleigh, NC
  • December 26 / The Birchmere Bandstand / Alexandria, VA
  • December 27 / World Cafe Live / Philadelphia, PA
  • December 28 / The National / Richmond, VA (w/ Dark Star Orchestra)
  • December 29 / The Norva / Norfolk, VA (w/ Dark Star Orchestra)
  • December 31 / Sheraton Center City Ballroom / Baltimore, MD (w/ Rebirth Brass Band)
  • January 22 / Club Cafe / Pittsburgh, PA
  • January 23 / The V Club / Huntington, WV
  • January 24 / 123 Pleasant Street / Morgantown, WV
  • January 28 / The Lantern / Blacksburg, VA
  • January 29 / Boone Saloon / Boone, NC
  • January 30 / Smith's Olde Bar / Atlanta, GA
  • January 31 / Mellow Mushroom / Tuscaloosa, AL
  • February 5 / The Continental / Houston, TX
  • February 6 / House Of Blues / Dallas, TX
  • February 7 / Stubb's BBQ / Austin, TX
  • February 10 / Winston's / San Diego, CA
  • February 11 / The Mint / Los Angeles, CA
  • February 13 / The Hopmonk Tavern / Sebastapol, CA
  • February 14 / Boom Boom Room / San Francisco, CA
  • February 18 / WOW Hall / Eugene, OR
  • February 19 / The Goodfoot / Portland, OR
  • February 22 / John's Alley / Moscow, ID
  • February 23 / Top Hat / Missoula, MT
  • February 27 / Quixote's / Denver, CO
  • February 28 / B Side Lounge / Boulder, CO

Steve Earle: Renaissance Man and American Rebel

photo by Ted Barron- for the Grateful Web

There are vast depths to singer/songwriter Steve Earle. Not only is he one of the best creative writers in music, having received thirteen Grammy nominations and winning two for Best Contemporary Folk Album, but he writes soundtracks for movies and television (P.S. I Love You, Brokeback Mountain, Pay It Forward, The Horse Whisperer, G.I. Jane, Dead Man Walking, and many more).  He's also an actor, having appeared regularly in the HBO prison drama The Wire, and he paints a little, too.

Earle ran his own record label for a few years. "I started a label called E Squared with a friend of mine named Jack Emerson right after I got out of jail in 1995,"  Earle said in a recent phone conversation.  "I recorded for that label with one distribution scheme or another till about three years ago when Jack passed away.... Just having a record label kind of got to be anti art. It got to be sort of like owning a pickup truck and everybody calls you to help them move.  I was just so busy trying to keep all that going I felt like I didn't have time to concentrate on what I do." He now records with   New West Records.

He's been working on a novel for the past six years, hoping to get that magnus opus done in the next few months. He did finish a book of haiku, a full year's worth of little gems, written one-a-day from wherever he was on the planet. He also published a collection of short stories called Doghouse Roses. In eleven stories, he told the tales of people struggling with drugs, trying to make it in the music industry, or living nightmares in Vietnam. Unfortunately, the literary world raked these human portraits over their ivory tower braziers. Earle never intended to create great art, just human art. And, he's been doing that for decades through multiple artistic genres.

"There's not as much difference as people would think between the job of writing and singing a song or acting or writing a book or a play," Steve Earle said. "The jobs aren't that far apart." Each one, calls upon the artist to walk in someone else's shoes to convey the story. "Some people get confused about that," he said, "but it is the way I approached doing it....That's the job. For me, it always has been."

Earle has the uncanny ability to create unforgettable characters, especially in his songs. Responding to a rough cut of the film Dead Man Walking that screenwriter/director Tim Robbins sent him, Earle wrote a gut-wrenching song about a prison guard called "Ellis Unit One."  "In The Horse Whisperer, I wrote a song based on the character as I saw it," Earle said, referring to the Robert Redford character, Tom Booker, who had finesse with people as well as horses. "I actually put words into the mouth of one of the characters in the movie."

However, that ability to get inside a character once caused media to vilify him. When "John Walker's Blues," which he wrote in 2002 about the young man who came to be known as the American Taliban, started hitting radio stations, it sent a shock wave throughout the country, with some  stations refusing to play it and causing talking heads to smack their mouths in a media frenzy. Yet, anyone who actually listened to the song understood that Earle wasn't being un-American. He merely saw a human being in the eyes of John Walker Lindh.  "I have a son that's exactly the same age as John Walker Lindh," Earle said. "I was really relating to that as a father. I saw that kid on TV. He was strapped to board, a skinny 20-year-old kid, and I had a skinny 20-year-old kid of my own at the time."

Earle's skinny little kid, Justin Townes Earle, is now 26 and he'll be playing at the Winnipeg Folk Festival this week. "He's been playing since he was 13 or 14," Earle said. "He was one of those post modern Nirvana fans. He was too young to have been a Nirvana fan when Cobain was alive. The acoustic thing, for him, kind of started from listening to the Nirvana Unplugged thing on MTV. Cobain was doing what he called 'Where Did You Sleep Last Night' and I always called 'In the Pines.'  My son was talking about how much he liked that song and I told him it was a Leadbelly song. He got into my records and my Leadbelly records are right next to my Lighting Hopkins records. He sort of went from there." Earle also had video recordings of some of these roots players, including Lightning Hopkins. "He could literally watch those and watch where they were putting their fingers. He plays that stuff really well."

But six years ago, Steve Earle steeled himself for the onslaught that his songwriting would produce. Even before he wrote the lyrics, he ignored advice from fellow musician Elvis Costello and others not to write it.  "I knew people were going to freak out," Earle remembered. "I had to make a conscious decision to write it anyway. I wrote it because I was genuinely inspired to do it." Still, he knew that he would not be understood. "There are a lot of people out there who only listen to every third word. At that point in time, most people were reacting to the reaction of a handful of people whose job is to overreact to stuff for the entertainment value of overreacting, the Rush Limbaughs, the New York Post.....I mean, if you're not pissing off the New York Post like I did, then you're not doing your job."

Though Earle's latest recording, Washington Square Serenade, doesn't have a song like "John Walker's Blues" on it, the album is no less stirring. His "City of Immigrants" was written to remind TV pundits who rail against immigration that this country was founded by and continues to prosper because of immigrants. And, "Oxycontin Blues," which is probably the most rootsy cut on this album, is about the widespread addiction of this painkiller in the South where it's known as Hillbilly Heroin.

"Before everybody learned the word from Rush Limbaugh, it was in the news," Earle said. "I lived in Tennessee for 32 years. It was in the news in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Virginia. People were crushing it up and either eating it or injecting it or snorting it, and they would die. Tennessee is one of the most landlocked states in the United States; it borders seven other states. It has just never had a particularly dependable supply of class A narcotics. It's always been that way. They've always been expensive and hard to get them in there....Dilaudid was the drug of choice when I was using. Nowadays, it's OxyContin."

Earle is currently touring with his wife, Alison Moorer, (Mrs. Earle number seven, by the way).

He will bring a bus load of instruments: a bouzouki, a mandolin, harmonica, tamboura, harmonium, several guitars including a resonator guitar and a 12 string, and his trusty banjo, a copy of an old White Lady open backed model made by Bart Rider made it. "I only know how to play the kind of banjo that scares sheep. It's a very, very primitive instrument in my hands," Earle said. All of these instruments were used on Washington Square Serenade.


His shows will also feature a club DJ, which you would never expect from an organic roots performer like Earle. However, he does have a very good reason for bringing this guy along. "The way we arrived at this record was over beats," Earle explained. "I recorded loops for the most part and played most of the instruments myself. Much of that I could have done solo, and that would have been fine. But for 'Satellite Radio' and 'Way Down in the Hall,' I just couldn't figure out how I was going to do them live. Then, John King, who produced the record and was also a DJ, suggested that I get a DJ. As it turned out my monitor engineer was a club DJ, and we started experimenting with it, and it works. You just have to see it."

Earle sees another album in the near future, as well as a lot more acting. "I'm doing a film in the fall," he said. "And I'll probably be acting more because I'm starting to get asked to.  I like doing it, and the insurance is better."

But he keeps songwriting ever most in his creative repertoire. "Still, my day job is making records and writing songs.  But all the other stuff, I bring back to my home-base craft.  I found that it makes it better."

Steve Earle grabs life and wrings as much meaning—and stories - out of it as he can, giving this Renaissance rebel a deep understanding of the human heart and human hunger. Catch Earle live in his new tour or savor his latest album Washington Square Serenade.

A Celebration of the Man & the Holiday

Martin Luther King, Jr. (1/15/29 - 4/4/68)- for the Grateful Web

On January 21st, 2008, Americans across the country will celebrate the national holiday honoring the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. As they have since 1995, hundreds of thousands of Americans will remember Dr. King by participating in service projects in their communities. Together, they will honor King's legacy of tolerance, peace, and equality by meeting community needs and making the holiday "A day ON, not a day OFF."

Thrust into the national spotlight in Birmingham, where he was arrested and jailed, King organized a massive march on Washington, DC, on August 28, 1963. On the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, he evoked the name of Lincoln in his "I Have a Dream" speech, which is credited with mobilizing supporters of desegregation and prompted the 1964 Civil Rights Act. The next year, King was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

The following is the exact text of the spoken speech, transcribed from recordings:

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we have come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked "insufficient funds." But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check - a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quick sands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny and their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.

As we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied, as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We can never be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair.

I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal."

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with a new meaning, "My country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring."

And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!

Let freedom ring from the snow capped Rockies of Colorado!

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California!

But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, When we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!"