men

Adrian Belew Power Trio ft. members of King Crimson at Boulder Theater

Boulder Weekly is proud to present Adrian Belew Power Trio with Stickmen featuring Tony Levin and Pat Mastelotto from King Crimson at the Boulder Theater on Tuesday, October 11th, 2011.  Tickets go on sale Friday, June 24th for $25 General Admission, $30 Reserved and $40 Gold Circle.

“2 of a Perfect Trio” Tour

King Crimson players Adrian Belew, Tony Levin and Pat Mastelotto keep very busy individually when Crimson's not active, but now, a historic joint tour: Adrian Belew Power Trio will headline the bill, with Stick Men (featuring Tony and Pat) opening.

And of course, how could they resist joining together for a Crim-centric extended encore - after their respective sets we'll see them reconfigure as Ade/Tony/Pat trio, morphing into the double trio lineup like King Crimson featured in the 90's.

The tour name, 2 of a Perfect Trio, harkens to the King Crimson song "3 of a Perfect Pair"

Adrian Belew's trio features the amazing bassist Julie Slick, and NYC drummer Tobias Ralph - perfect complements to Belew's extraordinary guitar playing and singing.

Stick Men presents Tony Levin's virtuosic playing on the Chapman Stick, with Pat Mastelotto giving his unique progressive drumming on both acoustic and electronic drums. Markus Reuter rounds out the band, playing his self-designed touch style guitar.

For more information please visit www.adrianbelew.net

-

Adrian Belew Power Trio

with Stickmen ft. Tony Levin & Pat Mastelotto from King Crimson

Boulder Theater

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

Doors:  6:30 pm

Show Time:  7:30 pm

Houston Rock Band Pale Sets Release of New CD

Houston-based rock quartet Pale, known for a blend of soaring melodies set against explosive, guitar-fueled choruses, is set to release their long-awaited new recording entitled IN THE TIME OF DANGEROUS MEN on June 21st. The new CD, which will be available via independent A-Blake Records, was produced by Steve Christensen (Destiny's Child, Clay Walker), who scored a Grammy last year for his work on Townes-A Tribute to Townes Van Zandt by Steve Earle.

From "Bad Intel," the blistering opening track, to the atmospheric "Hushed Tones for Chosen Ones," IN THE TIME OF DANGEROUS MEN showcases the rock-solid songwriting that has been Pale's hallmark since the band formed nearly 10 years ago. "This band has finally got all the elements in place for something big," Artshound.com has touted of the group's new record.

IN THE TIME OF DANGEROUS MEN was recorded during a two-month period last year when the band was sequestered at their label's beach house in Crystal Beach, Texas. Pale, who have been compared favorably to Muse, Radiohead and even U2, emerged with 12 standout new songs and a renewed determination to bring their Brit-rock-influenced music to a wider audience.

Pale's big, dramatic sound is "as subtle as a freight train" as the repeating chorus from the pensive "Catastrophic Skies" implies. From deep, thought-provoking tracks like "Soon" and "My Final Warning" to the high-velocity rock of "Wolves Wait" and "Our Lone Star Shines," their homage to the great state of Texas, IN THE TIME OF DANGEROUS MEN showcases Pale's ability to write memorable songs. The driving "That Sinking Feeling," the first single from the new album, will be serviced to radio in the coming weeks.

The trademark emotive voice of Pale belongs to lead singer/guitarist and chief songwriter Calvin Stanley, who along with guitarist/ keyboardist Robb Moore, bassist Stephen Wesson and drummer Travis Middour quickly rose to the top of the Houston club scene and broadened their domain through impressive live performances on their own and as openers for acts as diverse as Depeche Mode, Roger Waters, Earshot and Blue October.

Pale's recording debut HERE was released in 2004to positive critical response. The six-song EP MANDATORY AMBULANCE followed in 2007, both produced by Lars Goransson (Fastball, the Cardigans, Blondie). The release of the new CD harkens to new opportunities to come. Michael Clark, writing in the Houston Chronicle, expounded, "Pale has the rock 'n' roll ideal: the moxie and evolving know-how to get noticed in a business that gives less and less opportunity to new talent," adding, "Pale is trying to find the rock 'n' roll spirit again."

That rock 'n roll spirit is particularly evident in the extraordinary video the band created for the epic track, "Catastrophic Skies." Enlisting the aid of director Sean Duke and Chase Rees of Think Big Productions as well as countless friends and local volunteers, the result is an opulent cinematic feast with the futuristic look of a Mad Max film set against a contemporary story line about independent music artists battling corporate greed. They even hosted a Hollywood-style premiere for the video at Houston's famed River Oaks Movie Theatre late last year. The song had once been under consideration for the soundtrack of the film Twilight: Eclipse.

"Pale's music inspires the dreamer in all of us," says Calvin Stanley. "I've had my head in the clouds since I was a kid, and I believe that everything is possible with this band. That kind of dreaming heart has really helped pull us through some difficult times."

Pale will hit the road this summer in support of IN THE TIME OF DANGEROUS MEN following a pre-release kick-off concert in their hometown of Houston.Live Pale appearances will be announced shortly.

Jim Bianco Set to Release 'Loudmouth'

Critically acclaimed indie musician, singer, songwriter and producer Jim Bianco announces the release of his third LP Loudmouth on April 5. Funded entirely from his fiercly loyal fan base, Loudmouth is a return to form as Jim Bianco goes at it again: speaking to the sinner and the heartbroken in all of us, sifting through the filth and wreckage in his crooked heart and putting it to music in a way that makes women want to simultaneously sleep with him and slap him in the face; and men want to pick a fight and sing along.
And so Jim Bianco goes at it again; exposing, embarrassing and offending ex-girlfriends, future girlfriends, fellow singer/songwriters and, most notably, himself. Speaking to the sinner and the heartbroken in all of us, Jim Bianco has sifted through the filth and wreckage in his crooked heart and put it to music in his new record, Loudmouth. And as always, he’s done it in a way that makes women want to simultaneously sleep with him and slap him in the face; and men want to pick a fight and sing along.
The songs on Loudmouth explore the reckless depths of a touring musician, the devastation of a broken heart, the irony of being in love with someone who treats you like shit and the whimsical inclinations of a temporary secretary who dreams of being an elevator operator.
“There is humor on this record, but there is a darkness that comes along with it. You’ll get an occasional laugh, but it won’t be free. And there is no love song. There are songs of lust, songs of loss and songs of longing, but no love song.”  Bianco, who has always been a fiercely independent artist, funded the record entirely through his fans.“With the decline in funding for the arts that we’ve seen over the past few years, and the fact that music is so accessible that it’s essentially free, I’m thankful that I can put out an album and tour independently with only the support of my fans. I’m grateful that, as an artist who has a direct relationship with his fan base, I can continue making the music that I like for the people who want it – all without a middle-man to muck up the process.”
Bianco’s fans are also grateful for the direct line they have to him.  But it’s not only about the music.  There’s a sensibility that Bianco radiates in all his art. “I began blogging from the road just to pass the time.  There’s something redemptive about having people read about my follies and laugh and cry along with me.”  Bianco’s writing has received such a positive response from fans that he is in the process of publishing a book of short stories, which he plans to sell on tour in 2011. As if that weren’t enough, Bianco has recently taken to writing, acting, directing and editing his own silent films, which have garnered not only the attention of his fans, but of cinephiles, including Lorenzo DeStefano, the head of the Ventura Film Society. "Jim Bianco's new silent films embrace and expand on a lost era of filmmaking...they illuminate the human spirit in a way that is honest, charming and at times quite profound."
But at heart, Bianco is a performer. And he’s no stranger to the stage, having toured with the likes of Squeeze, Shelby Lynn, Imogen Heap, Joshua Radin, Josh Ritter and Loudon Wainwright III, to name a few. He’s been part of the legendary Hotel Café tour since it’s inception. His live show can take you on a voyage through the weightlessness of falling in love, or into the dark, dirty depths of the red light district of your imagination. With a firecracker’s presence on-stage, vocal chords that crack the plaster, and an occasional burlesque dancer, it is truly a wonder to watch him command a room.  Over the years, Jim’s music has been featured in a wide array of formats from key placements on in films and high profile TV shows including True Blood, performances on late night’s Craig Ferguson and NPR’s Mountain Stage.
With Loudmouth, Bianco feels that his live show will be catapulted to a new level. “These songs demand more of me because of their candor,” says Bianco.  “ They require all the tricks of my past performances – the intensity, the burlesque, the gitter; but also a resounding honesty that I’ve realized is fundamental in all worthwhile performances.”
Loudmouth captures the playful wit and spirit that has always defined Bianco, but is a marked departure from his earlier works. There’s plenty of mischief on the record, but there’s a certain maturity too. Not the kind of maturity that involves mortgages or afternoon naps; but the kind that is required to create something timeless.
With Loudmouth, it’s as if Bianco has transformed himself from the juggling clown of the circus into to it’s ringleader. But make no mistake - he’s still in the circus.  And he wouldn’t have it any other way.
--
Jim Bianco Tour Dates
Jan 20 - Rockwood - NY, NY
Jan 27 - Rockwood - NY, NY
Feb 4 - Rockwood - NY, NY

Jake Shimabukuro's "Go For Broke" pays tribute to soldiers' legacy

On 'Peace Love Ukulele' (out January 4th from Hitchhike Records), Jake Shimabukuro displays his customary "brilliance and brio" (NPR) on the ukulele with "Go For Broke," a Shimabukuro original that pays heartfelt tribute to the courageous American soldiers of Japanese ancestry who fought and sacrificed their lives in World War II.

The motto of the second-generation (Nisei) Japanese-American soldiers from Shimabukuro's native Hawaii, the most highly decorated U.S. unit in military history, was "Go For Broke," meaning "to risk everything on one great effort to win big." That's also a good description of the way Shimabukuro plays, with "stunning chops" and "a deep and sensitive musicality" (Guitar Player).

The Nisei veterans' determination has been a source of inspiration for Shimabukuro, himself of Japanese ancestry, since he was a young boy.  “Whenever I am faced with a problem, I always ask myself, 'How can I handle this situation in a way that would make a Nisei veteran proud?'" he says of the men of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, 100th Infantry Battalion, the 1399th Engineering Construction Battalion, and the Military Intelligence Service (MIS), who fought for the U.S. against their ancestral land at a time when those of Japanese heritage were often viewed with suspicion. “I think anyone who hears their story will be inspired to be a better person.”

Shimabukuro knows a peaceful way to express that inspiration. "If everyone played the ukulele, the world would be a better place," he says.

Listen to Jake Shimabukuro's "Go For Broke"

Albert King/Stevie Ray Vaughan on PBS

PBS has announced that the Albert King with Stevie Ray VaughanIn Session program will air as a special on its stations  throughout the month of December (check local listings). Grammy Award winning bluesman Robert Cray will serve as special fundraising host on the public television broadcasts.

In 1983, when legendary blues guitarist Albert King, then age 60, was joined by his disciple Stevie Ray Vaughan, then age 29, on a Canadian sound stage for the live music TV series In Session, magic took place.  Albert King with Stevie Ray Vaughan In Session is not simply a television program: it’s a summit of two master musicians. The only known recording of King and Vaughan performing together, this is the concert that blues fans in general, and Stevie Ray Vaughan fans in particular, have been waiting for.

The audio recording of the performance went on to sell more than 325,000 units from two releases: the first in 1999, the second in 2009. On November 9, 2010, Stax Records, a division of Concord Music Group, released In Session as both a DVD and a deluxe DVD/CD combination.

SonicBoomers.com noted: “Both men are gone now, but rare recordings like In Session remind us of a time when blues giants still walked the earth side by side.”

"As a document of what was probably the greatest night in the musical life of SRV (Stevie Ray Vaughan), this belongs in the collection of every true fan,” said the Austin American-Statesman.  Musicologist Samuel Charters says in his new liner notes for the package, “it’s also clear, nearly 20 years later, that this was a special moment in the careers of each of the two men.  It was evident from the first choruses that they were playing for each other. And that was the best audience either of them could ever have.”

An hour and 45 minutes, approximately, was taped of the two. What will thrill viewers who are fans of the blues, players of the blues, and who adore SRV, is that the televised concert includes at least one SRV tune — “Texas Flood” — that was not included on either of the two CD releases of the session.

The innovative Canadian television series was conceived with the intention of pairing musicians who were related stylistically, but seldom had an opportunity to play together. Albert King wasn’t sure whom he’d been booked to jam with on December 6, but he recognized the young Texan immediately — not as fast-rising star Stevie Ray Vaughan, but as Little Stevie, the skinny kid who’d been coming around and eventually sitting in every time Albert passed through Austin.

Stevie idolized Albert, as did many other “modern” electric axe-men. Albert may have been overshadowed by B.B., but Jimi Hendrix, Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, Robbie Robertson, Mick Taylor, and Joe Walsh — all of them listened to him, listened again and again, and were heavily influenced by his style.

At the time of the taping, the buzz may have been around Stevie, but Albert was clearly in charge of the music.  Earlier in the year, in May, David Bowie’s “Let’s Dance” featuring Stevie at his blistering Albert King-inspired best, hit the top of the Billboard pop singles chart; in June, SRV’s debut album Texas Flood came out, and MTV put “Pride and Joy” into their rotation. He never looked back.

During their performance, Albert ruled over the proceedings like a benevolent father, retaining control while allowing his guest loads of solo space in which to display his awesome command of the electric guitar.  The interplay between the two blues masters is uncannily empathetic, and Albert’s fans will find special pleasure in hearing him play rhythm parts at such length.  Aside from SRV’s two vocals — “Pride and Joy” and “Texas Flood” — all the other tunes are from Albert’s repertoire.  Viewers have the ineffable treat of seeing Albert King perform “Born Under a Bad Sign,” his trademark blues hit, as well as “Call It Stormy Monday.”

Sadly, King and Vaughan would not share a stage together ever again. Vaughan, 31 years King’s junior, died in a helicopter crash in the fog on the way back from a concert in 1990. King outlived him by two years, dying of a heart attack in 1992. They didn’t meet often, and their careers took different paths. But we can all be grateful for that one long day in a television studio when sparks flew and this timeless performance was forever captured.

The PBS special Albert King with Stevie Ray VaughanIn Session contains the following songs: “Born Under a Bad Sign,” “Call It Stormy Monday,” “Texas Flood,” “Pride and Joy,” “Match Box Blues,” and “Don’t Lie to Me.”