blues

Back by popular demand - the Grateful Dead Movie

By popular demand, The Grateful Dead Movie will be back in theatres on Thursday, May 5th! This special event not only features the legendary 1974 concert that captured the Dead at the pinnacle of worldwide fame, but exclusive never-before-seen interviews with Jerry and Bob conducted during the making of this cinematic rockumentary over 35 years ago. Originally recorded at San Francisco’s Winterland Arena in 1974, The Grateful Dead Movie makes film history with spell-binding performances of “U.S. Blues,” “One More Saturday Night,” “Casey Jones,” “Playing in the Band” and “Sugar Magnolia,” among other Grateful Dead classics.

Experience the magic all over again - Click here to find a theater location and buy your tickets. Limited seats available.

Take the music home with you when you pick up the 5-CD soundtrack to the film. Get it here!

David Bromberg's USE ME Tapes Friends

When David Bromberg, one of America’s finest roots musicians, emerged from a recording hiatus of 17 years with the solo, acoustic, traditional folk-blues album Try Me One More Time (Appleseed, 2007), fans and critics were thrilled, and the CD was rewarded with a Grammy nomination. For his follow-up album, Use Me, Bromberg chose a different approach: Why not ask some of his favorite singer-songwriters and musicians to write (or choose), produce, and perform on songs tailored to his versatile but distinctive skills as a guitarist and vocalist?

Answering David’s call were well-known artists from the many genres comprising the amorphous “Americana” musical category. Representing contemporary rootsy singer-songwriters: John Hiatt, the first musician Bromberg approached, who penned the pensive “Ride On Out a Ways” for him; for New Orleans “fonk,” Dr. John; there’s three-guitar jam band interplay with Widespread Panic and jug band music with Levon Helm (the sprightly “Bring It With You When You Come,” produced by Grammy-winning Larry Campbell). Linda Ronstadt puts in a rare appearance on a soulful Brook Benton ballad, Los Lobos contribute a Mexican-flavored waltz, Vince Gill and Tim O’Brien take care of the country and bluegrass quotient, Keb’ Mo’ brings the blues, and the hitmaking Butcher Brothers, producers Phil and Joe Nicolo (Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Cypress Hill, Nine Inch Nails), provide the languid R&B groove for the title song, a cover of Bill Withers’ classic “Use Me.”

The resultant album is due for July 12, 2011 release on Appleseed Records. A national tour will ensue.
Standout tracks change with each listening, but some of the high points include the crisp blues shuffle “Tongue,” the album’s lone Bromberg original, with Levon Helm on drums; “You Don’t Wanna Make Me Mad,” featuring David on slide guitar and Dr. John on piano; the ominous slow blues “Diggin’ in the Deep Blue Sea,” updated by Keb’ Mo’ and Gary Nicholson from Larry Davis’ “Texas Flood” to address the dangers of offshore drilling, and the chipper Vince Gill — Guy Clark co-write “Lookout Mountain Girl,” the only song on which David cedes most of the lead guitar duties (to Vince, although David splits the lead with Widespread Panic’s Jimmy Herring on “Old Neighborhood”).
Rather than collating individual instrumental parts literally phoned in to a central location, the recording sessions for Use Me generally took place on each guest artist’s home turf — in Woodstock (Levon Helm), New Orleans (Dr. John), Nashville (John Hiatt, Tim O’Brien, Vince Gill), Los Angeles (Los Lobos), and so on, to retain their regional flavors. For Bromberg, who started his professional career as an accompanist for everyone from Dion and Jay and the Americans to Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson, the sessions were simultaneously a throwback to his sideman days and a sidestep from his own recordings. “As artist and producer, I get to completely mold my vision of how the song should go,” he explains. “The drawback is that I don’t get many ideas that are not my own. It was fascinating for me to see the different approaches that everyone used in production.”
No matter who the producers, songwriters or accompanying musicians are on Use Me, Bromberg’s expressive guitar-playing and “rippling Fred Neil-like baritone that . . . brings warm, reassuring comfort” (Rolling Stone) remain the centerpiece of the CD, diamonds in golden settings.
Born in Philadelphia in 1945 and raised in Tarrytown, NY, “I listened to rock ’n’ roll and whatever else was on the radio,” says Bromberg. “I discovered Pete Seeger and The Weavers and, through them, Reverend Gary Davis. I then discovered Big Bill Broonzy, who led me to Muddy Waters and the Chicago blues. This was more or less the same time I discovered Flatt and Scruggs, which led to Bill Monroe and Doc Watson.”
Bromberg began studying guitar when he was 13 and eventually enrolled in Columbia University as a musicology major. The call of the Greenwich Village folk scene in the mid-’60s drew David to the downtown clubs and coffeehouses, where he could watch and learn from the best performers, including primary sources such as his inspiration and teacher, the Reverend Gary Davis.
Bromberg’s sensitive, blues-based approach to guitar-playing earned him jobs playing the Village “basket houses” for tips, the occasional paying gig, and lots of employment as a backing musician for Tom Paxton, Jerry Jeff Walker and Rosalie Sorrels, among others. He became a first-call, “hired gun” guitarist for recording sessions, playing on hundreds of records by artists including Bob Dylan (New Morning, Self Portrait, Dylan), Link Wray, The Eagles, Ringo Starr, Willie Nelson and Carly Simon. In the early ’90s, David produced an as-yet-unreleased Dylan album, although two tracks have been issued as part of Dylan’s “Bootleg Series.”
An unexpected and wildly successful solo spot at the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival in Great Britain led to a solo deal with Columbia Records, for whom David recorded four albums. His eponymous 1971 debut included the mock-anguished “Suffer To Sing the Blues,” a Bromberg original that became an FM radio staple, and “The Holdup,” a songwriting collaboration with former Beatle George Harrison on which Harrison also played slide guitar. David, who had met the Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia at the Woodstock Festival when they both took refuge from the rain in a tepee, wound up with four Dead members, including Garcia, playing on his next two albums.
Bromberg’s range of material, based in the folk and blues idioms, continually expanded with each new album to encompass bluegrass, ragtime, country and ethnic music, and his touring band grew apace. By the mid-’70s, the David Bromberg Big Band included horn-players, a fiddler, and several multi-instrumentalists, including David himself. Among the best-known Bromberg Band graduates: mandolinist Andy Statman, later a major figure in the Klezmer music movement in America, and fiddler Jay Ungar (who wrote the memorable “Ashokan Farewell” for Ken Burns’ PBS documentary, “The Civil War”).
Despite jubilant, loose-limbed concerts and a string of acclaimed albums on the Fantasy label, Bromberg found himself exhausted by the logistics of the music business. “I decided to change the direction of my life,” he explains. So David dissolved his band in 1980, and he and his artist/musician wife, Nancy Josephson, moved from Northern California to Chicago, where David attended the Kenneth Warren School of Violin Making. Though he still toured periodically, the recordings slowed to a trickle and then stopped.
After “too many Chicago winters,” in 2002 David and Nancy moved to Wilmington, Del., where they currently serve as unofficial “artists in residence” and where David established David Bromberg Fine Violins, a retail store and repair shop for high quality instruments. Frequent participation in the city’s weekly jam sessions helped rekindle Bromberg’s desire to perform music “live” again, and the encouragement of fellow musicians Chris Hillman (The Byrds, Desert Rose Band, Flying Burrito Brothers) and bluegrass wizard Herb Pedersen helped nudge him back into the recording studio. The Wilmington jams also led to the formation of Angel Band, fronted by Nancy and two other female vocalists, with David frequently serving as an accompanist.
Bromberg’s participation in his local and musical community has subsequently included a fund-raising music festival (Bromberg’s Big Noise in the Neighborhood) to help renovate a local theater, and a keynote address at this past spring’s Folk Alliance International convention, a non-profit organization of musicians, concert presenters and industry professionals.
David continues his musical revitalization with projects like Use Me, playing solo shows or backed by his own bluegrass quartet and reunions of the David Bromberg Big Band. Use your ears and catch him when you can!

Boulder Roots & Blues Summit

These are just a few of the names that will play the First Annual Boulder Roots & Blues Summit, May 13-15, in historic Boulder, Colorado. The Fox & Boulder theaters are excited to host a taste of the roots & blues between two venues for three days of live music by some of the finest musicians in the industry. Join us at the Boulder Theater each day for the early shows, and then move to the Fox Theatre for the late-night shows.

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The initial lineup is as follows:

Friday, May 13:

Lucinda Williams w/ Lionel Young at the Boulder Theater

Vieux Farka Toure and William Elliott Whitmore at the Fox Theatre

Saturday, May 14:

Leon Russell w/ Janiva Magness at the Boulder Theater

Davy Knowles with Hazel Miller Blues Band & Taylor Scott and Another Kind of Magic at the Fox Theatre

Sunday, May 15:

Sheryl Crow at the Boulder Theater

VIP Roots & Blues Summit Pass available Now for $325:

- Receive entry to all shows at the Fox & Boulder Theater May 13 – 15

- VIP Entrance to all shows

- Reserved seating for all shows at the Boulder Theater

- Reserved balcony for all shows at the Fox Theatre

- Limited edition 1st Annual Roots & Blues Summit silk screen poster

- Limited edition 1st Annual Roots & Blues Summit t-shirt

More Info / Buy Tickets

Hurricane Bells: Live At The House Of Blues Boston

A second Hurricane Bells' live album, Hurricane Bells Live At House Of Blues Boston, was released digitally yesterday via Live Nation. Recorded at the Boston stop of the band's tour supporting KT Tunstall this past November, the album features live performances of five tracks from Hurricane Bells' debut album Tonight Is The Ghost, plus B-side "Monsters" from The Twilight Saga: New Moon soundtrack, and new songs "Let's Go" and "The Ghost Of Her." Hurricane Bells Live At House Of Blues Boston is now available via iTunes. The band's first live album, Hurricane Bells Live At House Of Blues San Diego, was released in late March.

The brainchild of Steve Schiltz, longtime front man of Longwave, Hurricane Bells has released one EP, Down Comes The Rain, in addition to the one full-length album (and its deluxe edition) via Schiltz's own label Invisible Brigades. Schiltz wrote, recorded, played, and produced both releases entirely himself. On Monday night, Down Comes The Rain track "The Deep End" was featured on The CW's hit show Gossip Girl. Hurricane Bells' debut Daytrotter session is now online as well.

Schiltz is currently finishing mixing and mastering Hurricane Bells' sophomore full-length album, which will be released this summer.

Hurricane Bells Live At House Of Blues Boston track listing:

  1. This Is A Test
  2. Darkness Is So Deep
  3. The Ghost Of Her
  4. Freezing Rain
  5. Tonight I'm Going To Be Like A Shooting Star
  6. Let's Go
  7. Monsters
  8. The Cold Has Killed Us

Hurricane Bells touring line-up is: Steve Schiltz (vocals, guitar), Ashen Keilyn (vocals), Christian Bongers (bass), and Colin Brooks (drums).

GRAYSON CAPPS | 'The Lost Cause Minstrels' Streets June 7

Grayson Capps' fifth studio album, The Lost Cause Minstrels, is set for release June 7 on Royal Potato Family. The 11-track effort finds the Mobile, Alabama-based singer-songwriter coming of age. This doesn't mean, however, that his often unholy tales of the Southern Gothic have lost any of their sting. Quite the contrary, Capps' Tao-tinged, philosophical reflections--revealed deep inside songs shuddering with spit, stomp and snarl--are as potent as ever. Listen no further than "Highway 42," "No Definitions" and "Rock N Roll" to hear that Capps cedes no quarter. It's just that this time his bark and bite is more accepting of the unanswered questions mucking up the universe, while country soul textures and gospel harmonies ease the raw edges. Occasionally, even a celebratory mood prevails like the horn-fueled romp "Ol' Slac," an ode the rebirth of the Mobile, Alabama Mardi Gras, or "Coconut Moonshine," a character sketch based on Mr. Jim who inhabits the hallowed roadside barbecue joint in Ocean Springs, Mississippi. Two rare, but classic, American roots' numbers are born again here, as well: Taj Mahal's country-blues paen "Annie's Lover" and Richard Rabbit Brown's jaunty "Jane's Alley Blues," (the original recording preserved on Harry Smith's Anthology of American Folk Music).

Grayson Capps' real life situation has evolved since his previous release Rott 'n' Roll, and it surely influences the album's sound and spirit. In 2010, he dissolved his band The Stumpknockers, re-assembling a new cast of musicians, fittingly dubbed The Lost Cause Minstrels. The line-up features a who's who of the finest players on the Gulf Coast music scene, including Corky Hughes on guitars, Chris Spies on keys, Christian Grizzard on bass and John Milham on drums. Capps also moved back to Alabama, where he was born and raised, in the middle of recording the album. He'd been residing in Nashville since 2007 after being driven from his longtime New Orleans’ following Hurricane Katrina. Capps co-produced the effort with his longtime partner and Grammy Award-winning engineer/producer Trina Shoemaker (Queens of the Stone Age, Dylan Leblanc, Sheryl Crow). All of these factors coalesce into a collection of songs timeless in their pursuit of truth yet well aware of how hard the truth is to find in these times. The Lost Cause Minstrels is the highly anticipated next chapter from one of the finest Southern troubadours of the day.

The Lost Cause Minstrels track listing:

1. Highway 41
2. Coconut Moonshine
3. John The Dagger
4. Jane's Alley Blues
5. Chief Seattle
6. Yes You Are
7. Annie's Lover
8. Ol' Slac
9. Paris, France
10. No Definitions
11. Rock n Roll

Upcoming tour dates:

May 1 | Rosie's Grill | Daphne, AL (*solo acoustic)
May 3 | Chickie Wah Wah's | New Orleans, LA
May 5 | Le Petite Theater | New Orleans, LA (*Southern Troubadours also featuring Anders Osborne, Tab Benoit and Devon Allman)
May 6 | DBA | New Orleans, LA (8PM)
May 6 | Le Bon Ton Temp Roulet | New Orleans, LA (*Late Night)
May 7 | River Pub | Hurricane, AL
May 13 | The Fire | Jackson, MS
May 14 | The Hangout | Gulf Shores, AL
May 21 | Northshore Grill | Orange Beach, AL
May 25 | The Nick | Birmingham, AL
May 27 | Smith's Olde Bar | Atlanta, GA
May 28 | Jamming At Hippy Jack's | Crawford, TN (taping for PBS broadcast)
May 29 | Rosie's Grill | Daphne, AL (*solo acoustic)
June 3 | Oak's Cafe | Brewton, AL
June 4 | Pirate's Cove | Josephine, AL
June 12 | Callaghan's Irish Social Club | Mobile, AL
June 14 | Blue Gill | Mobile, AL
June 16 | Myers Park | Gulf Shores, AL
June 17 | DBA | New Orleans, LA
June 18 | The Porch | Lake Charles, LA
June 19 | Callaghan's Irish Social Club | Mobile, AL
June 23 | Rhythm & Brews | Chattanooga, TN
June 24 | The Basement | Nashville, TN
June 25 | Phoenix Hill Tavern | Louisville, KY
July 16 | Chrome Horse | Silver Hill, AL
July 17 | Callaghan's Irish Social Club | Mobile, AL
July 20 | The Grey Eagle | Asheville, NC (*solo acoustic)
July 21 | Duck Pond | Brevard, NC (*solo acoustic)
July 22 | Shenanigan's | Dahlonega, AL (*solo acoustic)
August 4 | Woodwalk Gallery & Events Barn | Egg Harbor, WI
August 6 | Lumberjam Festival | Hayward, WI

Elvin Bishop's 'Raisin' Hell Revue' coming on Delta Groove on May 17

Elvin Bishop’s musical biography is no secret to anyone who has followed blues or rock over the past 40 years. Taken under wing by legendary bluesman Little Smokey Smothers in the ’60s, Bishop found a wide audience as guitarist in the Paul Butterfield Blues Band and in the ’70s scored a Top-10 radio hit with “Fooled Around and Fell in Love.” Along the way, he’s carved out a niche all his own, playing an appealing mix of rootsy rock ’n’ roll, R&B and barroom boogie, steeped in the heavy blues he learned from Little Smokey all those years ago.

So when a bunch of close friends who also happen to be consummate musicians are sequestered together, as they were at sea on the 2010 Legendary Blues Cruise, what else were they to do but unite forces to create some truly exemplary music? Thankfully the tapes were rolling, and the musical experience was saved for posterity. Delta Groove Music will release the resultant Raisin’ Hell Revue live album on May 17, 2011. And with the good vibes of a ship full of fellow music lovers to buoy the band, you can really hear that everyone was having a great time.

Over the course of their featured performance, Bishop shares the vocal mike with four hard-hitting pros: blues veteran Finis Tasby (Lowell Fulson, Freddie King, Clarence Carter, Z.Z. Hill), fast-rising harmonica man John Németh (Anson Funderburgh, Junior Watson), Norwegian blues guitar star Chris (Kid) Anderson (Charlie Musselwhite’s band), and Bishop’s long-time band-mate and Bay Area legend, saxophonist Terry Hanck. They work their way through a strutting, soulful set of blues and R&B with the powerful grace of a veteran working outfit, perfectly highlighting the strengths of everyone involved. And it really is a “revue” in the classic sense of the term — various band members representing a wide array of styles move in and out of the spotlight, all presided over by the good-humored and congenial master of ceremonies Elvin Bishop. We’re treated to swinging up-tempo R&B, lowdown blues, rootsy rock ’n’ roll, and a touch of gospel; even a fantastic reworking of Bishop’s smash hit “Fooled Around and Fell in Love” is included featuring the wonderfully gifted and dynamic vocalist John Németh.

Born and raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Elvin Bishop didn’t have much exposure to live music as a youngster. But his family had a radio, and in between the pop schmaltz and the C&W that ruled the airwaves in the 1950s, that radio could sometimes catch the legendary R&B programming beamed throughout the southern part of the U.S. at night by Nashville radio station WLAC. That station introduced Bishop to the classic records of Jimmy Reed, Howlin’ Wolf and Muddy Waters, and once his ears had been hooked, there was no turning back for young Elvin. He soon got his first guitar and on his own began scratching out the basic outlines of the blues, R&B and rock ’n’ roll that had captured his imagination.

By the time he was preparing to go to college in the late ’50s, Bishop had earned a National Merit Scholarship, allowing him to go to almost any school he chose — and there was only one choice on Elvin’s mind, the prestigious University of Chicago, which just happened to be located on Chicago’s South Side, ground zero for much of the urban blues Elvin had been studying only from a distance. He arrived in Chicago in 1959, and before long crossed paths with a kindred spirit in Paul Butterfield.  Together, they explored the ghetto blues clubs in the black neighborhoods surrounding the university campus at a time when blues giants like Muddy Waters, Little Walter, Otis Rush, Magic Sam and Howlin’ Wolf could be found playing in neighborhood joints on a weeknight. Elvin soaked it all up, gaining impromptu lessons and invaluable stage time in front of discerning audiences, and forging a fluid yet powerful guitar style of his own.

By 1963, Bishop and Butterfield were ready to graduate — not necessarily from the university, but certainly from their apprenticeship under Chicago’s blues elders.  Recruiting Howlin’ Wolf’s former rhythm section of Sam Lay on drums and Jerome Arnold on bass, the Paul Butterfield Blues Band was born. In 1965, after adding Mike Bloomfield and Mark Naftalin to the lineup, their revolutionary debut LP was released, kicking open the door for virtually all the young white blues bands that followed.

Bishop remained in the fold for three albums with the Butterfield band, including their innovative East-West release (on which Bishop and Bloomfield’s intertwining guitars helped set the stage for the Allman Brothers Band among many others who followed), before venturing out on his own. Elvin released four well-received albums on Epic Records in the early ’70s before joining Capricorn Records for a couple of LPs and experiencing his biggest pop success, the national hit “Fooled Around and Fell in Love” from his 1976 album Struttin’ My Stuff.

As popular musical trends evolved, the recording projects tapered off, but road work kept Elvin busy through the ’80s, and by the time he hooked up with Alligator Records in 1988, he was returning to his bluesy roots. And that fertile territory has been his focus ever since.

Delta Groove Productions president Randy Chortkoff has been a fan and follower of Elvin’s music through all the many phases of his career, beginning with Butterfield in the mid ’60s, so when the opportunity arose to bring Elvin into the Delta Groove fold, Chortkoff jumped at the opportunity. The result was Elvin’s Grammy-nominated 2008 CD The Blues Rolls On, a project supported by an all-star cast of blues royalty, among them B.B. King, Warren Haynes, Derek Trucks, George Thorogood, James Cotton, Kim Wilson, Tommy Castro, John Németh and Angela Strehli.

The Philadelphia Inquirer noted that “ . . .he’s as lively and sharp-witted as ever. No purist, he bends a variety of styles to his irrepressible personality.”

And now, with the new Delta Groove release Raisin’ Hell Revue, Bishop and crew invoke deep blues while at sail on the deep blue sea.

B.B. King's rescheduled date at the Boulder Theater

97.3 KBCO & Westword are proud to present the rescheduled date for B.B. King at the Boulder Theater on Saturday, August 20th, 2011.

His reign as King of the Blues has been as long as that of any monarch on earth. Yet B.B. King continues to wear his crown well. At age 76, he is still light on his feet, singing and playing the blues with relentless passion. Time has no apparent effect on B.B., other than to make him more popular, more cherished, more relevant than ever. Don't look for him in some kind of semi-retirement; look for him out on the road, playing for people, popping up in a myriad of T.V. commercials, or laying down tracks for his next album. B.B. King is as alive as the music he plays, and a grateful world can't get enough of him.

For more than half a century, Riley B. King - better known as B.B. King - has defined the blues for a worldwide audience. Since he started recording in the 1940s, he has released over fifty albums, many of them classics. He was born September 16, 1925, on a plantation in Itta Bena, Mississippi, near Indianola. In his youth, he played on street corners for dimes, and would sometimes play in as many as four towns a night. In 1947, he hitchhiked to Memphis, TN, to pursue his music career. Memphis was where every important musician of the South gravitated, and which supported a large musical community where every style of African American music could be found. B.B. stayed with his cousin Bukka White, one of the most celebrated blues performers of his time, who schooled B.B. further in the art of the blues.

B.B.'s first big break came in 1948 when he performed on Sonny Boy Williamson's radio program on KWEM out of West Memphis. This led to steady engagements at the Sixteenth Avenue Grill in West Memphis, and later to a ten-minute spot on black-staffed and managed Memphis radio station WDIA. "King's Spot," became so popular, it was expanded and became the "Sepia Swing Club." Soon B.B. needed a catchy radio name. What started out as Beale Street Blues Boy was shortened to Blues Boy King, and eventually B.B. King.

In the mid-1950s, while B.B. was performing at a dance in Twist, Arkansas, a few fans became unruly. Two men got into a fight and knocked over a kerosene stove, setting fire to the hall. B.B. raced outdoors to safety with everyone else, then realized that he left his beloved $30 acoustic guitar inside, so he rushed back inside the burning building to retrieve it, narrowly escaping death. When he later found out that the fight had been over a woman named Lucille, he decided to give the name to his guitar to remind him never to do a crazy thing like fight over a woman. Ever since, each one of B.B.'s trademark Gibson guitars has been called Lucille.

Soon after his number one hit, "Three O'Clock Blues," B.B. began touring nationally. In 1956, B.B. and his band played an astonishing 342 one-night stands. From the chitlin circuit with its small-town cafes, juke joints, and country dance halls to rock palaces, symphony concert halls, universities, resort hotels and amphitheaters, nationally and internationally, B.B. has become the most renowned blues musician of the past 40 years.

Over the years, B.B. has developed one of the world's most identifiable guitar styles. He borrowed from Blind Lemon Jefferson, T-Bone Walker and others, integrating his precise and complex vocal-like string bends and his left hand vibrato, both of which have become indispensable components of rock guitarist's vocabulary. His economy, his every-note-counts phrasing, has been a model for thousands of players, from Eric Clapton and George Harrison to Jeff Beck. B.B. has mixed traditional blues, jazz, swing, mainstream pop and jump into a unique sound. In B.B.'s words, "When I sing, I play in my mind; the minute I stop singing orally, I start to sing by playing Lucille."

In 1968, B.B. played at the Newport Folk Festival and at Bill Graham's Fillmore West on bills with the hottest contemporary rock artists of the day who idolized B.B. and helped to introduce him to a young white audience. In ``69, B.B. was chosen by the Rolling Stones to open 18 American concerts for them; Ike and Tina Turner also played on 18 shows.

B.B. was inducted into the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame in 1984 and into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. He received NARAS' Lifetime Achievement Grammy Award in 1987, and has received honorary doctorates from Tougaloo(MS) College in 1973; Yale University in 1977; Berklee College of Music in 1982; Rhodes College of Memphis in 1990; Mississippi Valley State University in 2002 and Brown University in 2007. In 1992, he received the National Award of Distinction from the University of Mississippi.

In 1991, B.B. King's Blues Club opened on Beale Street in Memphis, and in 1994, a second club was launched at Universal CityWalk in Los Angeles. A third club in New York City's Times Square opened in June 2000 and most recently two clubs opened at Foxwoods Casino in Connecticut in January 2002. In 1996, the CD-Rom On The Road With B.B. King: An Interactive Autobiography was released to rave reviews. Also in 1996, B.B.'s autobiography, "Blues All Around Me" (written with David Ritz for Avon Books) was published. In a similar vein, Doubleday published "The Arrival of B.B. King" by Charles Sawyer, in 1980.

B.B. continues to tour extensively, averaging over 250 concerts per year around the world. Classics such as "Payin' The Cost To Be The Boss," "The Thrill Is Gone," How Blue Can You Get," "Everyday I Have The Blues," and "Why I Sing The Blues" are concert (and fan) staples. Over the years, the Grammy Award-winner has had two #1 R&B hits, 1951's "Three O'Clock Blues," and 1952's "You Don't Know Me," and four #2 R&B hits, 1953's "Please Love Me," 1954's "You Upset Me Baby," 1960's "Sweet Sixteen, Part I," and 1966's "Don't Answer The Door, Part I." B.B.'s most popular crossover hit, 1970's "The Thrill Is Gone," went to #15 pop.

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Tickets are on sale at Boulder Theater Box Office. Call (303) 786-7030 for tickets by phone.

Tickets are also available through our website @ www.bouldertheater.com.

Tickets are On Sale Friday March 25!

$69.50 GA / $87.50 Reserved / $115.00 Gold Circle

Boulder Roots & Blues Summit | 5/13 - 5/15

These are just a few of the names that will play the First Annual Boulder Roots & Blues Summit, May 13-15, in historic Boulder, Colorado.  The Fox & Boulder theaters are excited to host a taste of the roots & blues between two venues for three days of live music by some of the finest musicians in the industry.  Join us at the Boulder Theater each day for the early shows, and then move to the Fox Theatre for the late-night shows.

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The initial lineup is as follows:

Friday, May 13:

Lucinda Williams w/ Special Guest at the Boulder Theater

Doors:  6:30 PM

Show:   7:30 PM

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Saturday, May 14:

Leon Russell w/ Janiva Magness at the Boulder Theater

Doors:  6:30 PM

Show:  7:30 PM

Davy Knowles at the Fox Theatre

Doors:  9:30 PM

Show:  10:30 PM

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Sunday, May 15:

Sheryl Crow at the Boulder Theater

Doors:  7:00 PM

Show:  8:00 PM

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VIP Roots & Blues Summit Pass available Now for $325:

-       Receive entry to all shows at the Fox & Boulder Theater May 13 – 15

-       VIP Entrance to all shows

-       Reserved seating for all shows at the Boulder Theater

-       Reserved balcony for all shows at the Fox Theatre

-       Limited edition 1st Annual Roots & Blues Summit silk screen poster

-       Limited edition 1st Annual Roots & Blues Summit t-shirt

-       10% off at George’s Food & Drink attached to the Boulder Theater May 13 – 15

Exclusive presale for The Grateful Dead Movie event

Dead.net and NCM Fathom are proud to present a special one-night event featuring the first nation-wide screening of The Grateful Dead Movie since 1995 plus a never-before-seen interview with Jerry. Under the direction of Jerry and co-directed by Leon Gast, this legendary 1974 concert captures the Dead at the pinnacle of their psychedelic worldwide fame while documenting the Dead Head experience. The film includes band performances of "U.S. Blues," "One More Saturday Night," "Casey Jones," "Playing in the Band," and "Sugar Magnolia," among other Dead classics. This is one movie experience you won’t want to miss in theaters.

Grab tickets for this very special screening before they go public with our Dead.net exclusive pre-order. Limited seats available - click here to find a theater location and buy your tickets.

Chicago vocalist Alison Ruble is featured this week on 12th STREET JUMP

12th STREET JUMP, public radio’s weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, continues with guest appearances by Chicago vocalist Alison Ruble and guitarist John McLean this Saturday night, March 12 at midnight Central Time (1am Eastern, 11pm Mountain, 10PM Pacific). The popular radio show, recorded live on Kansas City's famed 12th Street Strip,  is syndicated on the Public Radio Exchange and streamed live.

Alison Ruble is a Chicagoland favorite with several hot CDs to her credit, including the most recent. Musical director John McLean joins Ruble direct from sessions and tours with Grammy winning vocalist Kurt Elling.

Award-winning tenor saxman Bobby Watson appears on the April 9 tribute to pianist Herbie Hancock. Trumpet player Stan Kessler and reedmen Kerry Strayer and Kim Park are also featured in upcoming weeks on the show.

Hosted by Pete Weber and Pearl MacDonald, 12th STREET JUMP features vocalists David Basse and Nedra Dixon, musical director Joe Cartwright on piano, Tyrone Clark on bass and Mike Warren on drums in a fast-paced hour of jazz, blues and topical sketch comedy. "It's sort of like a jazz and blues 'Prairie Home Companion' or SNL," explained Exec Producer Mark Edelman.

The 12th STREET JUMP line up of featured artists and special guests includes the following (all dates are Saturdays):

CELEBRATING THE BIRTHDAY OF         WITH SPECIAL GUEST 

March 12               Nat King Cole                                    Alison Ruble & John McLean

March 19               King Pleasure                                    Kim Park

March 26               Thad Jones                                       Stan Kessler

April 2                   Gerry Mulligan                                    Kerry Strayer

April 9                   Herbie Hancock                                  Ken Lovern

April 16                 Lionel Hampton                                  Peter Schlamb

April 23                 Otis Rush & Albert King                      Bill Dye

April 30                 Groove Holmes                                   Everette DeVan

Broadcast live from the 12th Street Jazz Walk of Fame, Kansas City’s jazz, blues and honky-tonk heart, 12th STREET JUMP continues that tradition on the same street where Count Basie tickled the ivories at the Reno Club and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues.”