money

The Game samples Guster on New Album

West coast Hip Hop icon The Game sampled alt-pop pioneers Guster on his new song "Pot Of Gold" featuring Chris Brown.  The track is featured on The Game's new The R.E.D. Album, which debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200, and features a large portion of the Guster classic "Rocketship" from the band's 2007 classic "Goldfly". You can watch the video for The Game's new Guster-sampled track here, and read a a witty Q&A the band did regarding the song on their website.

The band will be donating a portion of the money they earn from "Pot of Gold" to the Crittenton Women's Union.  Drummer Brian Rosenworcel offered this statement regarding their reaction to being sampled for this song, as well as their reasoning for choosing Crittenton Women's Union to donate their proceeds.  "Mostly we're flattered to have been sampled in a hit song.  I don't think it'll send droves of people out to discover our "Goldfly" album, but we're excited that we can make a donation to a worthwhile charity with money that comes in from this.  I have a friend who works at Crittenton Women's Union in Boston, and they do great work helping survivors of domestic abuse become economically independent".

The band is currently on tour with Jack's Mannequin in support of their new E.P. On The Ocean. Even Hurricane Irene couldn't keep the band off the road, as they ran into some pretty crazy weather on route.  They documented their experience with Irene here, as they made their way from New York to their show that night in Indiana.  Check out their remaining dates below.

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Remaining Tour Dates

09/02/11 - Interlochen, MI @ Kresge Auditorium

09/03/11 - Highland Park, IL @ Ravinia Festival

09/04/11 - Columbus, OH @ LC Pavilion

No Jam in the Dam 2011, look for return in 2012

A note from the organizers of the Jam in the Dam Festival:

Dear Friends,

After long consideration, we have decided to postpone Jam in the Dam until 2012. We really wanted to do it for the fans, including our growing base of Europeans for whom this show is the one chance each year they can enjoy what many of us here take for granted. We had sincere interest from many bands this year, but in the end, we felt like we did not have a line-up that would be ‘new and improved’ from years past. With the economic climate and the expense involved in traveling to Europe, we find that Jam In the Dam may be more approachable for the fans and may become more successful as a biannual event.

Amsterdam offers a cultural experience unlike that of any other festival in this genre. Ask anyone who has been, and they will rave about the atmosphere and intimate nature. We are planning to have 2012 ready to go by February 2011, so that we can offer a choice to traveling jamband fans. This will also give people a year to plan for the time off and save their money. Also, we’re working on more weekend days so more of our friends from Europe can become part of our growing scene there.

Most people who are fans of this amazing event know what the founder, Armand Sadlier, has been through, but rest assured his health is better than ever. This event will NOT go away, and his love of Amsterdam will be the catalyst for continuing to bring people to one of the most beautiful and welcoming cities on Earth! See you in 2012!

~ Jam in the Dam ~

The Voice Project - Singing Ugandan Child Soldiers Back Home

The Voice Project launches to support Ugandan women’s groups who are using music to bring the child soldiers home - Featuring Andrew Bird, Mike Mills, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, Joseph Arthur, Joe Purdy, Dawes, SoKo & many more to come...

The Voice Project a US based non-profit supporting the women of Northern Uganda who have been using music effectively to bring soldiers home from Africa’s longest running war, the 24 year old conflict that has devastated the region of Northern Uganda, Congo, Southern Sudan and CAR.

Many soldiers fighting with Joseph Kony's LRA were abducted as children and forced to fight. Many were made to kill their own friends and family, and while many do eventually escape, they often hide in the bush ashamed and afraid to come home because of what they were made to do.

Women in the region, widows and rape survivors, have been banding together into groups to care for each other and the orphans left by the war. Often without the right to even own land, these women have been taking a lead role in the Peace and Reconciliation efforts, one of their main tools: using messages carried in songs spread on the radio and by word of mouth into the bush to let the soldiers know that they are forgiven and that they should come home. And it's working. Soldiers have been hearing the songs and coming home.

Considering the atrocities the women have been subjected to, this is clearly not only one of the greatest uses of music, but also one of the greatest acts of compassion, love, and forgiveness one can find. Co-Founder Hunter Heaney first heard of the women’s efforts and how they were using music to call the soldiers home while working at an IDP camp (Internally Displaced Persons) in the tiny village of Agoro on the Uganda/Sudan border in 2008. He learned the women’s songs from different groups in the region and when they asked him to teach them some, the first one to come to mind was Joe Purdy’s “Suitcase.” Heaney brought the story of how the women were using music home with him, telling friends like music producer Chris Holmes and filmmaker Anna Gabriel. Together they assembled a team of friends like Internet entrepreneurs Kelleigh Faldi and CC Lagator, Web Developer Jason Young, Nicole Grable from the NGO world, and music industry veterans like Jay Sweet, Andrea von Foerster and Ana Calderon, and together started The Voice Project to support the women.

The story was passed to Alex Ebert from Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros who offered to combine the record release party for his new band’s debut album Up From Below with the project to raise money for the ladies. The money was used to start a small farm in Gulu. The women celebrated and sent their thanks in song, a phone call to Heaney singing the Joe Purdy tune he had taught them nine months before, and a short video of them singing the chorus to Edward Sharpe’s “Home” which has been making its way around the Internet.

From there, the idea for the “cover chain” was born. Taking the lead from the women in Uganda, the friends decided to keep the chain going and have artists pass on the story of the women to other musicians by each covering another’s song, with The Voice Project team filming each link as a series of episodes that would eventually circle back around to the women in Uganda, posting each online and raising money along the way from sponsors, advertisers and donors to support the women, the peace movement, and rehabilitation programs for former child soldiers.

Episodes featuring Andrew Bird, Mike Mills, Dawes, Joseph Arthur, Tom Freund, Joe Purdy and SoKo have already been shot and posted, with upcoming links from Peter Gabriel, Devendra Banhart, The Submarines, Bedouin Clash and many more on the way. A number of non-profits have also been getting behind the project in hopes of raising awareness and support for the war-torn region, including Oxfam International, Witness, HOPE and others.