music

HOWARD LEVY HARMONICA SCHOOL

The Howard Levy Harmonica School online has appreciatively received a warm and enthusiastic response from the harmonica playing community and student base from around the world.  The Howard Levy Harmonica School, an online video-exchange-based learning site for harmonica players created by ArtistWorks, is led by Howard Levy, arguably the world’s most prominent harmonica master. The nature of this innovative school is its appeal to players from novice to virtuoso. The range of music taught includes Blues, Jazz, Folk, World Music and more, with technical instruction in bending, overblowing, developing speed, and basic music theory to help students be able to play well in all these styles. A person can enroll in the “HLHS” a beginner, and can learn and improve rapidly to become an advanced player. The HLHS has hundreds of pre-recorded HD video lessons, with more added each week. In addition to video exchange interaction with Howard, students participate in a very active and supportive online community and help each other advance in their playing as well. Launched in December 2009, the HLHS has experienced a surge of new student enrollment and the support of top industry leaders and media.

Hohner USA has embraced the program with an exclusive offer of a “Special 20” harmonica (valued at $47) to new student members, a promotion kicking off this month, and a significant article appeared on Harmonica411.com, offering an overview of the Howard Levy Harmonica School and an in-depth look at Howard’s technique and approach to playing. The breaking news of this one-of-a-kind learning platform from the man universally acknowledged as the world’s most advanced diatonic harmonica player has landed students from all around the USA and Canada, as well as many international students from South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia.

HLHS students learn by video exchange with Howard Levy, submitting clips of their playing to Howard for his review. Howard then provides a personalized video response to the student offering guidance on mastering the lesson. The exchange between teacher and student are permanently recorded and paired on the site for the entire Harmonica School to learn from, and breaks new ground in learning a musical instrument online. Renata Yambaeva is a new student based in Russia who enrolled last month and shares, “I really like this format. The lessons are helpful, interesting and pleasant. Howard found right length of a lesson - about five minutes, it’s the perfect time. And I really appreciate Howard's sense of humor, the lessons never bore!” Tapan Bhatt, an India-based student who is also the Secretary of the Harmonica Club of Gujarat respectfully notes, “I feel I am late by many years in learning from Mr. Levy. In true spirits, I am extremely enjoying the lessons.”

“It is clear that the ArtistWorks platform is redefining online visual education,” says David Butler, ArtistWorks CEO, “the video exchange format enables worldwide student enrollment, allowing Master Class-level teaching to reach harmonica enthusiasts of all types, in all countries. The additional support of leading harmonica market contributors only reaffirms the necessity and interest of the harmonica education curriculum.”

The recent addition of “New Tune Fridays” to the HLHS presents students with one or more new song lessons with backing tracks, with a message of encouragement to try different playing techniques over it. This effort cheers students on and inspires them to play something new each week in addition to their regular lessons. Learn a new tune this Friday at the Howard Levy Harmonica School online.

The Harmonica411.com Artist Interview with Howard Levy can be viewed here.

About Artistworks:

The ArtistWorks online visual education format allows virtuoso musicians to “Teach the World” by presenting their full method, technique or curriculum in HD video to subscribing students of their sites. Simple webcams are used by the students to submit videos to the Artist through the site, for critique and guidance if they want personalized instruction. The Artists manage the video flow by using the Video Management System created and owned by ArtistWorks, Inc. (patent pending). Regardless of whether or not students participate in exchanging videos with the Artist, these “Video Exchanges” are posted for all subscribing students to learn from. This groundbreaking use of video exchange for the instruction of musical instruments has been implemented at Jimmy Bruno Guitar Institute, the Qbert Skratch University, Andreas Oberg Guitar Universe, Peery Piano Online, Tony Trischka School of Banjo and Howard Levy Harmonica School. Learn more at www.ArtistWorks.com.

The Voice Project - Singing Ugandan Child Soldiers Back Home

The Voice Project launches to support Ugandan women’s groups who are using music to bring the child soldiers home - Featuring Andrew Bird, Mike Mills, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, Joseph Arthur, Joe Purdy, Dawes, SoKo & many more to come...

The Voice Project a US based non-profit supporting the women of Northern Uganda who have been using music effectively to bring soldiers home from Africa’s longest running war, the 24 year old conflict that has devastated the region of Northern Uganda, Congo, Southern Sudan and CAR.

Many soldiers fighting with Joseph Kony's LRA were abducted as children and forced to fight. Many were made to kill their own friends and family, and while many do eventually escape, they often hide in the bush ashamed and afraid to come home because of what they were made to do.

Women in the region, widows and rape survivors, have been banding together into groups to care for each other and the orphans left by the war. Often without the right to even own land, these women have been taking a lead role in the Peace and Reconciliation efforts, one of their main tools: using messages carried in songs spread on the radio and by word of mouth into the bush to let the soldiers know that they are forgiven and that they should come home. And it's working. Soldiers have been hearing the songs and coming home.

Considering the atrocities the women have been subjected to, this is clearly not only one of the greatest uses of music, but also one of the greatest acts of compassion, love, and forgiveness one can find. Co-Founder Hunter Heaney first heard of the women’s efforts and how they were using music to call the soldiers home while working at an IDP camp (Internally Displaced Persons) in the tiny village of Agoro on the Uganda/Sudan border in 2008. He learned the women’s songs from different groups in the region and when they asked him to teach them some, the first one to come to mind was Joe Purdy’s “Suitcase.” Heaney brought the story of how the women were using music home with him, telling friends like music producer Chris Holmes and filmmaker Anna Gabriel. Together they assembled a team of friends like Internet entrepreneurs Kelleigh Faldi and CC Lagator, Web Developer Jason Young, Nicole Grable from the NGO world, and music industry veterans like Jay Sweet, Andrea von Foerster and Ana Calderon, and together started The Voice Project to support the women.

The story was passed to Alex Ebert from Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros who offered to combine the record release party for his new band’s debut album Up From Below with the project to raise money for the ladies. The money was used to start a small farm in Gulu. The women celebrated and sent their thanks in song, a phone call to Heaney singing the Joe Purdy tune he had taught them nine months before, and a short video of them singing the chorus to Edward Sharpe’s “Home” which has been making its way around the Internet.

From there, the idea for the “cover chain” was born. Taking the lead from the women in Uganda, the friends decided to keep the chain going and have artists pass on the story of the women to other musicians by each covering another’s song, with The Voice Project team filming each link as a series of episodes that would eventually circle back around to the women in Uganda, posting each online and raising money along the way from sponsors, advertisers and donors to support the women, the peace movement, and rehabilitation programs for former child soldiers.

Episodes featuring Andrew Bird, Mike Mills, Dawes, Joseph Arthur, Tom Freund, Joe Purdy and SoKo have already been shot and posted, with upcoming links from Peter Gabriel, Devendra Banhart, The Submarines, Bedouin Clash and many more on the way. A number of non-profits have also been getting behind the project in hopes of raising awareness and support for the war-torn region, including Oxfam International, Witness, HOPE and others.

The Inimitable Baby Dee Tours in Support of Upcoming Release

After the overwhelming response to Safe Inside the Day in February 2008, the unique Baby Dee returns with A Book of Songs for Anne Marie, out in North America on 4/20 via Drag City. What was telling about the response to Safe Inside the Day was the purity of reaction. The back story, (let’s face it, Baby Dee is the epitome of the phrase) never overshadowed the fact that she gives everything and that is what connects with critics and audience alike. Harkening to the song cycles and lieder of Schubert and Schumann, the tracks of A Book of Songs for Anne Marie are part of a greater whole, a series of poems set to music. Joined by a talented group of musicians, including Matthew Robinson (cello), Sarah Alden (violin), John Nowel (violin) and John Contreras (cello), Dee will cross the continent, performing these minimally orchestrated, tender songs on piano as only she can: with humor, warmth, and gravity.

Check out the song “Lilacs” off of A Book of Songs for Anne Marie here.

Baby Dee Tour Dates:

Thursday, April 8 - Philadelphia, PA @ World Cafe

Friday, April 9 - Baltimore, MD @ Floristree

Saturday, April 10 - New York, NY @ Santos Party House

Monday, April 12 - Montreal, QC @ La Sala Rossa

Tuesday, April 13 - Toronto, ON @ The Music Gallery

Wednesday, April 14 - Cleveland, OH @ Opening Nights Festival

Thursday, April 15 - Cleveland, OH @ Beachland Ballroom

Friday, April 16 - Chicago, IL @ The Hideout

Saturday, April 17 - Cedar Rapids, OH @ CSPS

Sunday, April 18 - Dubuque, IA @ Monks Kaffee Pub

Monday, April 19 - Minneapolis, MN @ Cedar Cultural Center

Tuesday, April 20 - Winnipeg, ON @ West End Cultural Centre

Friday, April 23 - Calgary, AB @ The Big Secret Theatre

Saturday, April 24 - Calgary, AB @ The Big Secret Theatre

Tuesday, April 27 - Vancouver, AB @ Gallery Gachet

Wednesday, April 28 - Seattle, WA @ The Triple Door

Thursday, April 29 - Portland, OR @ The Woods

Friday, April 30 - San Francisco, CA @ Amnesia

Saturday, May 1 - Santa Monica, CA @ McCabes

Sunday, May 2 - Phoenix, AX @ Trunk Space

Monday, May 3 - Albuquerque, NM @ Outpost Performance Space

Wednesday, May 5 - Columbia, MO @ Mojos

Thursday, May 6 - Lexington, KY @ Niles Gallery (UK Campus)

Friday, May 7 - Detroit, MI @ Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit

National Jazz Museum in Harlem April Schedule

Come pursue the varieties of jazz experience at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem! From conversations and live performances to educational sessions and panel discussions, you’re sure to have a ball and learn a lot too.

For Jazz for Curious Readers, scholar of jazz and saxophonist Salim Washington will discuss his co-authorship of a recent work delving into the Miles Davis/John Coltrane relationship and impact. Harlem Speaks features discussions with baritone sax master Joe Temperley, and critically-praised and provocative big band leader Darcy James Argue.

If live music performance is your bent, look no further than our three concert series:  Harlem in the Himalayas, which this month starts with a pairing of radically talented musicians Suphala, a tabla whiz, and jazz pianist Jason Lindner, to whom no style is foreign. The second featured artist for this series held at the Rubin Museum of Art is young trumpeter Dominick Farinacci, who has absorbed the jazz trumpet tradition and presents it with suave and vitality. Jazz at the Players has yet another young player making his mark, pianist Aaron Diehl, in a trio setting. And bring your dancing shoes, as trumpeter Etienne Charles, who recently (as did Diehl) graduated from Juilliard, inaugurates our newest series, right here in Harlem, with  an ensemble for Jazz at the Dwyer (where people come to dance and enjoy the music) that will embody the spirit of Trinidad within the frame of jazz.

This month the National Jazz Museum in Harlem puts special focus on the musical and cultural contributions of an important early jazz figure, Fats Waller. At Jazz for Curious Listeners (every Tuesday evening) we begin with his rich legacy as a composer of compositions key to the jazz dimensions of the American Song Book, and continue on with his place in American music as a pianist and organist. In the latter part of April we present a Saturday Panel on “Fat Waller’s Harlem: Reflections on the 1920s and 30s” and top it off with Fats on film for the last JFCL event of the month.

What are you waiting for? Mark your calendar!

Friday, April 2, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas
Jason Lindner/Suphala
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
For tickets: RMA Box Office or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344

Pianist Jason Lindner grew up in Brooklyn, NY, started playing piano by ear at age 2 and was playing jazz proficiently at 15. He apprenticed with master bebopper Barry Harris and the mystic master Chris Anderson (Herbie Hancock's harmonic guru), and worked as a journeyman with Junior Mance, Tardo Hammer, Harold Danko, Frank Hewitt and Jaki Bayard before exploring a world of Latin and African rhythms, Funk, R&B, Hip Hop, Electronica, and even Rock. He's been a fixture in the New York jazz scene since the mid-90s when the well-respected Greenwich Village club, Smalls, became home for a new generation of forward-thinking jazz musicians. There he led smaller ensembles and then a big band; Lindner regularly drew sold out crowds on Monday nights at Smalls, earning him an Impulse records debut on Jazz Underground/Live At Smalls, which led to a full-length release on Chick Corea’s Stretch label, Premonition.

He frequently performs in New York and around the world with Claudia Acuña, Meshell Ndegeocello, Baba Isreal, Dafnis Prieto, Omer Avital, Anat Cohen, Luisito Quintero, Malika Zarra, Juancho Herrera, and with his own groups the Ab Aetero, Now vs. Now, Progress Report, the JL-ECTRIK, Big Pump and the Jason Lindner Big Band, now celebrating its 12th year. He has also recorded with (and served as Musical Director for) Lauryn Hill and Amel Larrieux, toured with Roy Haynes, performed with and arranged for Arturo O'Farrill's Grammy-winning Jazz at Lincoln Center Afro-Latin Orchestra, and shared both stage and studio with Chick Corea, Junior Cook, Elvin Jones, Wynton Marsalis, Paquito D’Rivera, Jon Hendricks, James Moody, Graciella (Machito Orchestra), Mark Turner, Lou Donaldson, Jimmy Cobb, Lou Donaldson, The Henry Mancini Orchestra, Mark Turner, Christian McBride, Vernel Fournier, and other artists. Jason Lindner also teaches internationally.

Suphala, one of the most versatile young tabla artists making music today, was raised in the U.S. by Indian parents, and began learning western classical music on the piano at age four, performing at age five, and as a teen transferred her passion to one of the world’s most complex percussion instruments: the tabla. She combines a prodigious technical command of her instrument with a playful sense of experimentation, switching effortlessly between composing, producing and performing

Suphala is a protégé of the great tabla masters Ustad Allarakha and Ustad Zakir Hussain, whose constant inspiration compels her to dedicate herself to the study of Indian classical music while extending the reach of the tabla into a mosaic of musical genres and cultural contexts. Her fluency in a range of musical traditions informs her unique compositions and her highly improvisational performances, as you’ll witness at the Rubin Museum. The three albums she has released to date – Instru Mental (2000), The Now (2005) and Blueprint (2007) – go beyond a particular genre style while referencing such diverse influences as Western classical, Indian classical, jazz, folk and soul.

This pairing will be extraordinary. Don’t miss it.

Monday, April 5, 2010

Jazz for Curious Readers
Salim Washington
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Clawing at the Limits of Cool

Born in Memphis, Tennessee, Salim Washington moved to Detroit, Michigan with his family at the age of eight. Early on he was drafted into the neighborhood gang; fortunately, the gang leader happened to play trumpet, which influenced Salim, ironically, to pursue music not gangs.  He began on trumpet, and then studied classical piano. By middle school, Salim was performing in school ensembles and student funk bands. His college years brought him to Harvard, after which he joined the Worlds Experience Orchestra under the leadership of Jamyl Jones, and then the Source of Life Arkestral Revelation (SOLAR) in Boston, touring with them extensively throughout the south. After returning to Detroit, he taught music in prisons and in public schools. He eventually returned to Boston to finish his degree. After completing his doctorate, he headed to New York to begin a professorship at the Brooklyn College Conservatory of Music. He has travelled extensively, playing music festivals throughout the US and Canada, Latin America, and Europe. He has also led music workshops for the Northern Ireland Arts Council in Belfast, the Bill Evans conservatory in Paris, and others. Salim Washington is a member of the Jazz Study Group at Columbia University and has participated on various committees and panels in service of jazz, including those convened by the Ford Foundation, the Boston Phoenix, the New England Foundation for the Arts.

In Salim’s collaboration with Farah Jasmine Griffin for the recently-published Clawing at the Limits of Cool, the two scholars chronicle the drama of the musical relationship between Miles Davis and John Coltrane, from their initial historic partnership to the interlude of their breakup, during which each man made tremendous progress toward his personal artistic goals. The book even continues with the last leg of their journey together, a time when the Miles Davis group, featuring John Coltrane, forever changed the landscape of jazz. Washington and Griffin also argue that Davis and Coltrane’s collaborations embodied important ideas about what it meant to be a black artist during the Civil Rights era. By insisting on the legitimate cultural value of their work, Coltrane and Davis challenged dominant images of black musicians as merely entertainers, earning the respect of blacks and whites alike for their accomplishments as artists.

From an idiomatic perspective, the authors also examine the profound implications that the Davis/Coltrane collaboration would have for jazz and African American culture, drawing parallels to the changing standards of African American identity with their public personas and private difficulties.

Find out more about the content and context of this important jazz work, and Salim Washington’s journey in jazz at Jazz for Curious Readers.

Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Joint is Jumpin': Fats Waller: The Composer
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

We focus on the composing genius of Fats Waller as we start a month-long series in his honor. In the American public memory, perhaps because of his filmic images, Fats Waller is known as a smiling, eyebrow raising entertainer who also played piano. Fact is that Waller was one of the best of the New York jazz pianists in the au courant styles of that day—from Stride to Swing. He was also a fabulous organist, having cut his teeth at the open air religious services led by his father, Edward Waller, a Baptist lay preacher. He played piano at his public school and at 15 became organist at the Lincoln Theatre on 135th Street.

His father hoped that Waller would follow a religious calling rather than a music career, but after his mother Adeline Waller died in 1920, he moved in with the family of the pianist Russell B. T. Brooks. Waller soon met James P. Johnson, under whose tutelage he developed as a pianist and through whose influence he came to make piano rolls—starting in 1922 with Got to Cool My Doggies Now. There’s even evidence to support Waller's claims that during his formative years as a pianist he studied with Leopold Godowsky and composition with Carl Bohm at the Juilliard School.

Waller wrote many pop hits – Ain’t Misbehavin’, Honeysuckle Rose, for example – but also explored extended compositions with this London Suite. We’ll look at the breadth of his compositions this evening.

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Joe Temperley, Saxophonist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Scotland-born Joe Temperley first achieved prominence in the United Kingdom as a member of Humphrey Lyttelton's band from 1958 to 1965. He toured the United States with the band in 1959, and, in 1965, came to New York City, where he performed and/or recorded with Woody Herman, Buddy Rich, Joe Henderson, Duke Pearson, the Jazz Composers’ Orchestra, and the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra and with Clark Terry, among many others. In October 1974 he toured and recorded with The Duke Ellington Orchestra as a replacement for Harry Carney.

Mr. Temperley played in the Broadway show Sophisticated Ladies in the 1980s, and his film soundtrack credits include The Cotton Club, Biloxi Blues, Brighton Beach Memoirs, When Harry Met Sally, and Tune In Tomorrow, composed by Wynton Marsalis. Mr. Temperley is a mentor and a cofounder of the FIFE Youth Jazz Orchestra program in Scotland, which now enrolls 70 young musicians ages 7 to 17 playing in three full-size bands. Mr. Temperley has released several albums as a leader, including Nightingale (1991), Sunbeam and Thundercloud with pianist Dave McKenna (1996), With Every Breath (1998), and Double Duke (1999). He released two new recordings in September 2001. He is an original member of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra (now JALC Orchestra) and serves on the faculty of the Juilliard Institute for Jazz Studies, which opened in fall 2001. He has served on the Manhattan School of Music faculty since 1992.

Tonight Temperley, known too for his moving feature on Duke’s “A Single Petal of a Rose” with the JALC Orchestra, will discuss his tenure in this world-class jazz big band led by Wynton Marsalis as well as his previous decades of service in the vineyards of jazz.

Friday, April 9, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas
Dominick Farinacci
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
For tickets: RMA Box Office or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344

For a soulful listen to the future of jazz now, you can’t miss with young trumpeter Dominick Farinacci, an exemplar of the brass tradition in jazz in full bloom. Last year, after having released six albums as a leader on a Japanese record label, Farinacci debuted with critical acclaim in the U.S., on the Koch label, with “Lovers, Tales, and Dances.”

He's won a variety of awards over the years in the States and in Japan—Farinacci received two Gold Disc awards (Record of the Month) from Swing Journal Magazine in Japan for his recordings of "Say It" and "Besame Mucho," for example. In 2003 he received the International New Star Award in Japan, an honor previously awarded to Diana Krall and Christian McBride, co-director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem. In the United States, Dominick was the recipient of the ITG Carmine Caruso International Jazz Trumpet Competition in 2003.

At 15, he was "discovered" by Wynton Marsalis in Cleveland, Ohio, Farinacci’s place of birth. Wynton invited Dominick to appear as a featured soloist with the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra on a PBS broadcast, "Live from Lincoln Center." While studying with Warren Vache and Wynton Marsalis at the Juilliard School, Dominick was also featured at Lincoln Center on a tribute concert to Freddie Hubbard and Lee Morgan, "Night of the Cookers." Over the years he has performed and/or recorded with many high-profile jazz artists such as Joe Lovano, Wynton Marsalis, Ira Sullivan, Mulgrew Miller, Carl Allen, Jason Miles, and Joe Labarbera.

Prepare to be dazzled by virtuosity and moved by the emotional weight of this young trumpet lion as he claws at the limits of cool with an intense yet relaxed approach to the jazz trumpet tradition.

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Joint is Jumpin': Fats Waller: The Pianist
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Over sixty years after his death, the consummate artistry and high-spirited zest for living make pianist/composer Fats Waller one of the most celebrated artists in jazz history. His best-known compositions, such as "Ain't Misbehavin'," "Honeysuckle Rose," "Black and Blue," and "Jitterbug Waltz," long ago entered the canon of American music, as discussed in last week’s Jazz for Curious Listeners class.

Moreover, his skills as a pianist place him in the top tier of those who played the instrument, but this fact has been obscured by his greatness as an entertainer with a widespread following in the United States and Europe.

Tonight we focus on the art of Fats Waller as a pianist: his playing (and his songs) reverberates to this day amongst jazz fans and musicians cognizant of his influence and depth. As a pianist, Waller was the outstanding exponent of the Harlem Stride style of jazz piano, drawing together the innovations of Willie "The Lion" Smith and James P. Johnson into a coherent style.

And taken alone, the fact that he was a major influence on the peerless Art Tatum speaks to the eternal place Fats Waller will maintain among the pantheon of jazz greats. Come hear his piano mastery in all of its splendor at the Visitor’s Center of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem.

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Joint is Jumpin': Fats Waller: The Organist
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Jazz organ fans of what some call the “modern” age of jazz—from bebop and beyond—often gravitate to Jimmy Smith as the icon of the Hammond B3. But if we go back, through the careers of Wild Bill Davis and Sarah McLawler, preceding Smith, we'd end up at the start of jazz organ: Fats Waller.

The son of a Baptist minister, Waller played church organ even before playing piano. During the silent film era he was a theatre organist in New York. Fats also taught Count Basie how to play the organ and he probably had the first recording featuring an electric Hammond organ.

However, it’s on the pipe organ that Waller made several recordings lost to obscurity that will be resurrected and placed properly in the light of recognition tonight, as we’ll hear rare Waller gems heretofore only recognized by the jazz cognoscenti.

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Jazz at the Players
Aaron Diehl Trio
7:00pm
Location: The Players
(16 Gramercy Park S. |  get directions)
$20 | Reservations or 212-475-6116

Hailed by the Chicago Tribune as "The most promising discovery that [Wynton] Marsalis has made since Eric Reed," Aaron Diehl's distinctive interpretations of the music of Scott Joplin, "Jelly Roll" Morton, Art Tatum, Duke Ellington, and other masters pay homage to the tradition while establishing his own original voice.

He has performed with the Wynton Marsalis Septet, the JALC Orchestra, The Boston Symphony Orchestra, Hank Jones, Wycliffe Gordon, Wessell Anderson, Benny Golson, NJMH executive director Loren Schoenberg, and has been featured on Marian McPartland’s NPR radio show “Piano Jazz.” His international touring includes major European jazz festivals as well as performances in South America and Asia. “Mozart Jazz,” his first CD as a leader, was released in 2006 on the Pony Canyon label (Japan). Recent performances include the Caramoor Festival and the Allen Room at Jazz at Lincoln Center's Frederick P. Rose Hall.

A native of Columbus, Ohio, Diehl is a 2007 graduate of the Juilliard School, where his teachers included recent Harlem Speaks guest and NEA Jazz Master Kenny Barron, Eric Reed, and Oxana Yablonskaya. His honors include Lincoln Center’s prestigious Martin E. Segal award in 2004, winner of the 2003 Jazz Arts Group Hank Marr Jazz Competition, and Outstanding Soloist at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s 2002 Essentially Ellington Competition. Immediately following graduation from high school he toured with the Wynton Marsalis Septet.

Aaron Diehl currently resides in Manhattan where he serves as music director of St. Joseph of the Holy Family Church in Harlem. Check out a master-in-the-making playing live at Jazz at the Players.

Thursday, April 22, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Darcy James Argue, Bandleader
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

His debut recording, Infernal Machines, featuring his 18-piece big band, Secret Society, made Darcy James Argue one of 2009’s most talked-about jazz musicians. He was given a series of features in jazz and non-jazz publications alike, multiple nominations at the 2009 Jazz Journalists Association Awards, and a presence on more than 70 best-of-the year lists, including Best Debut honors in the prestigious Village Voice Jazz Critics Poll.

Formed in 2005, Secret Society evokes an alternate musical history in which the dance orchestras that ruled the Swing Era never went extinct, but remained a popular and vital part of the evolving musical landscape. Adopting a steampunk-inspired attitude towards the traditional big band, Argue refashions this well-worn instrumentation into a cutting-edge ensemble. The band’s first studio recording takes its name from a John Philip Sousa quote about the dangers of music technology.

Secret Society holds the honor of being the first group to be announced for George Wein’s 2010 Newport Jazz Festival.

A native of Vancouver, and former member of the Montreal jazz scene, Argue moved to Brooklyn in 2003 after earning a Master’s Degree in Boston while studying with legendary composer/arranger Bob Brookmeyer. He has also studied with Lee Hyla, Randall Woolf, Maria Schneider and John Hollenbeck. His awards include the BMI Jazz Composers’ Workshop Charlie Parker Composition Prize and the SOCAN/CAJE Phil Nimmons Emerging Composer Award.

Reward yourself by attending this conversation with one of the cutting-edge band leaders in the jazz idiom.

Friday, April 23, 2010

Jazz at the Dwyer
Trinidad meets Jazz with the Etienne Charles Band
7:00 – 11:00pm
Location: The Dwyer Cultural Center
(258 St. Nicholas Avenue at W. 123rd Street)
$20 | More information: info@DwyerCC.org

A new series dedicated to jazz and dancing commences with this Friday evening’s JAZZ AT THE DWYER, held at Harlem’s new and vital community center.

In 2009, Etienne Charles brought a large ensemble to the Riverside Theatre in a National Jazz Museum in Harlem program that featured jazzed up versions of classic Caribbean sounds.

The result was so infectious that audience members leapt from their seats to dance.

Expect more of the same, as Trinidadian Etienne Charles and his company of musicians trumpet this mélange of styles to the grooving satisfaction of your ears and feet.

Born on the island of Trinidad in 1983, Etienne Charles’ musical lineage runs at least four generations deep. Yet perhaps it was his father, Francis, who influenced him most. Francis was a member of Phase II Pan Groove, one of Trinidad’s most progressive steel bands and one that Etienne would later join. Immersed in his father’s vast record collection, and suffused with the sounds of calypso, steel pan, and African Shango drumming, Etienne imbibed many of the influences that make up the colors of his harmonic palette.  An alumnus of the prestigious Juilliard School, Charles has received critical acclaim for his exciting performances, thrilling compositions and a knack for connecting with audiences worldwide.
Saturday, April 24, 2010

Saturday Panels
Fats Waller's Harlem: Reflection on the 1920s and 30s
12:00 – 4:00pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

As was Fats Waller central to early jazz, Harlem was an epicenter of the music’s development as well as the stomping grounds for much of the growth of Waller’s aesthetic. Today we’ll examine the connection between Waller and Harlem, viewing Harlem from the vantage of Waller’s work, life and times.

Some historical backdrop of Waller’s career in the 20s and 30s will prepare you for this special afternoon, which continues our month-long investigation into the world of Fats Waller:

In October 1922, Waller made his recording debut as a soloist for Okeh with Muscle Shoals Blues and Binningham Blues, and began a series of recordings the same year as accompanist for several blues singers, including Sara Martin, Alberta Hunter, and Maude Mills. In 1923, a collaboration with Clarence Williams led to the publication of Waller's Wild Cat Blues, which Williams recorded with his Blue Five, including Sidney Bechet, that other great early jazz pioneer from New Orleans. Another composition, Squeeze Me, was published the same year; these began to establish Waller's reputation as a composer of material performed and recorded by other artists. 1923 also saw his broadcasting debut for a Newark local station, followed by regular appearances on WHN of New York. Waller continued to broadcast as a singer and soloist throughout his life, including the long-running Fats Waller's Rhythm Club and Moon River (on which he played organ). During the early 1920s, he continued as an organist at the Lincoln and Lafayette theaters in New York.

In 1927, Waller recorded his own composition Whiteman Stomp with Fletcher Henderson’s orchestra, one of the most significant large ensembles during the era of the dance bands. Henderson also made use of other works by Waller, including Crazy 'bout My Baby and Stealing Apples. Waller's other work as a composer with the lyricists Edgar Dowell, J. C. Johnson, Andy Razaf, and Spencer Williams produced such songs as Honeysuckle Rose and Black and Blue. With Razaf he worked on much of the music for the all-black Broadway musical Keep Shufflin' (1928). Their later collaborations for the stage included the shows Load of Coal and Hot Chocolates (which incorporated the song Ain't Misbehavin' as a vehicle first for Cab Calloway and later Louis Armstrong). Waller's Carnegie Hall debut took place on April 27, 1928, where he was a piano soloist in a version of his mentor James P. Johnson's fantasy Yamekraw, for piano and orchestra.

In 1926, Waller began his recording association with Victor, his principal record company for the rest of his life, with the organ solos St. Louis Blues and his own Lenox Avenue Blues. Although he recorded with various groups, his most important contribution to the Harlem stride piano tradition was a series of solo recordings of his own compositions: Handful of Keys, Smashing Thirds, Numb Fumblin', and Valentine Stomp (1929). After sessions with Ted Lewis (1930), Jack Teagarden (1931), and Billy Banks's Rhythmakers (1932), he began in May 1934 the voluminous series of recordings with a small band known as Fats Waller and his Rhythm.

In the mid-1930s, Waller worked on the West Coast with Les Hite's band at Frank Sebastian's New Cotton Club. He also appeared in two films while in Hollywood in 1935, Hooray for Love! and King of Burlesque. For tours and recordings, Waller often led his own big band. This began as an expanded version of the band led by his bass player (Charlie Turner's Arcadians), and in 1935, with most members of the Rhythm it made its first recording. The group's version of I Got Rhythm includes a cutting contest of alternating piano solos by Waller and Hank Duncan.

In 1938, Waller undertook a European tour, recording in London with his Continental Rhythm, as well as making solo pipe-organ recordings for HMV. His second European tour in 1939 was terminated by the outbreak of war, but while in Britain, he recorded his London Suite, an extended series of six related pieces for solo piano: Piccadilly, Chelsea, Soho, Bond Street, Limehouse, and White Chapel. It is Waller's longest composition and represents his aspiration to be a “serious” composer rather than only the author of a string of hit songs.

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Joint is Jumpin': Fats Waller: Film night
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

This month the National Jazz Museum in Harlem peered deeply into the artistry and legacy of Fats Waller, first as a composer, pianist, organist and then as one of the central figures of jazz in Harlem.

Tonight we’ll end where popular culture begins as regards Waller, with him on film playing music and mugging for the camera as a showman.

You’ll surely leave with a smile as we view clips from Waller’s Hollywood appearances in feature films and soundies, early versions of the music video. Soundies were three-minute musical films, produced in New York, Chicago, and Hollywood between 1940 and 1946, and often included short dance sequences.

Look out especially for the pairing of Waller and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, which captures a moment in jazz history where dance, song and improvisation were joined at the hip.

Consider yourself hip? Then we’ll see you at the Visitor’s Center of the National Jazz Museum . . . with Fats Waller on screen, you’re guaranteed that the joint will be jumping! 

PHAROAH SANDERS RETURNS to BROOKLYN

Two of Brooklyn’s vanguard organizations for African American music and culture, Central Brooklyn Jazz Consortium and International African Arts Festival, will collaborate to produce a Community Day Gala Concert, as part of the 11th Annual Central Brooklyn Jazz Festival, featuring saxophone great Pharoah Sanders. This event will take place on Saturday, March 27th at Boys and Girls High School auditorium located at 1700 Fulton Street in the Bedford Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn.  Tickets are $35 in advance, available online or by calling 718.773.2252 or 718.638.6700.  Doors open at 7:30 PM concert begins at 8:00 PM.

Grammy award winner Pharoah Sanders has not performed in Brooklyn since his days at the legendary jazz shrine The East. Pharoah’s ascent to stardom began with collaborations with John Coltrane.  His distinctive sound has revered him among many jazz lovers.  Other jazz luminaries he has performed or recorded with include: McCoy Tyner, Elvin Jones, Sun Ra, Don Cherry, Billy Higgins and Alice Coltrane just to name some.  This concert also includes performances by Omi Yesa (Afro-Cuban and Yoruba folklore music) and poet Louis Reyes Rivera.

International African Arts Festival is a not for profit entity that began in 1971 as a fundraiser for the Uhuru Sasa School. Their cultural presentation was originally known as the African Street Carnival, fore runner to BAM’s Dance Africa Festival.  Now in its 40th year the annual IAAF attracts nearly 75,000 people and presents musicians from across the African Diaspora.  International artist such as Fela Kuti, The Mighty Sparrow, Lauren Hill and Abbey Lincoln, just to name a few, as well as local artists present(ed) their musical styling's.

11th Annual Central Brooklyn Jazz Festival, March 27th thru April 30, 2010, will feature a lineup of international, local musicians; jazz forums; youth performances and a Brooklyn Jazz Hall of Fame & Museums (TM) induction ceremony.  Confirmed venues include: Brooklyn Tech Auditorium, Weeksville Historical Society, BAMcafe Live, Parlor Jazz, Dweck Center for Contemporary Culture-Brooklyn Public Library Central Branch, Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Plaza, Afroarts Design, Sistas’ Place, Hitchcock Institute for Studies in American Music at Brooklyn College, Two Steps Down, Brooklyn Borough Hall, Brooklyn Arts Council, Rustik Lounge, Brooklyn Historical Society, New York Aquarium, Sugar Hill Restaurant and non traditional music venues throughout the borough.

Central Brooklyn Jazz Consortium acknowledges Brooklyn Tourism and Visitors Center, Long Life Information & Referral Network, Brooklyn Arts Council, Department of Cultural Affairs and International African Arts Festival, Inc. for assistance with producing the 11th Annual Central Brooklyn Jazz Festival, the longest continuous running jazz festival in the borough.

Central Brooklyn Jazz Consortium/CBJC founded in 1999, is an amalgam of patrons, entertainment venues, faith based and community organizations and musicians.  Over the past ten (10) years CBJC has presented an annual spring festival, established a Brooklyn Jazz Hall of Fame & Museum (TM), and produced yearly programs that feature local jazz talent.  CBJC is a nonprofit corporation committed to preserving, promoting and supporting live music within the under served communities of Brooklyn.

Earl Greyhound Premiere Ghost And The Witness

EARL GREYHOUND is pleased to announce the release of Suspicious Package, a blistering
rock inferno spun out of the Brooklyn trio’s inspired and innovative
rock-n-roll imagination machine.  Suspicious Package was recorded at Red Bull Studios in Santa Monica, under the nimble and keen producerly auspices of Dave Schiffman (Mars Volta, Red Hot Chili Peppers, System of a Down).


Earl Greyhound formed in 2002 with the collaboration of songwriters Matt Whyte and Kamara Thomas, who began performing regularly as a duo in NYC. All the while, they were crafting the unique sound and songs that would form the foundation for a colossal rock band. Their influences swept from the strident English three-and four-pieces of the 70’s, to the dark pop and heavy grunge grooves of the 90’s, to the transcendental, noisy acid sounds of modern rock.

In 2005, EG recorded their first album, Soft Targets, but they also hit their first snag when drummer Chris Bear left to pursue his fortunes with the band Grizzly Bear. Reluctant to release the album without a permanent drummer, Matt and Kamara vowed to play relentlessly until their dream drummer found them. Guitar player Kirk Douglass (The Roots) witnessed a show and brought his friend and Gold Crowns band mate Ricc Sheridan to the next few gigs. Ricc says, “I awoke from a dream one night, and I knew this was my band.” A few weeks later, a rockneck-inducing jam confirmed that the band had found its soul mate, and they hit the ground running.  Soft Targets and EG’s wrecking ball of a live show earned them oodles of fans and critical acclaim from The New Yorker, SPIN, Rolling Stone, Brooklyn Vegan and Pitchfork, among others. The next three years were spent touring the US, Canada and Japan as well as opening for Gov’t Mule, Chris Cornell and Saul Williams.


Suspicious Package is Earl Greyhound’s sophomore release. The album marks a turning point in the band’s maturation since the benefit of Mr. Sheridan’s full creative collaboration. Listeners will notice a marked expansion into the higher reaches of the sonic territories. Heavy, dark, groovy and grand—Suspicious Package is a reminder that though ROCK is still only a four-letter word, it can still pack a load of splendor.

US Tour

3/23  - Rochester, NY - Harro East Theatre & Ballroom#
3/24  - Syracuse, NY - The Westcott Theater#
3/25 - Clifton Park, NY - Northern Lights#
3/26  - South Burlington, VT - Higher Ground#
3/28 - Portland, ME - - Port City Music Hall#
3/29 - Hartford, CT - Webster Theater#
3/30 - Scranton, PA - Hardware Bar#
3/31 - Brooklyn, NY - Music Hall of Williamsburg#

4/13 – Salt Lake City, UT - The State Room*
4/14 – Denver, CO - Bluebird Theatre*
4/16 – Milwaukee, WI - Turner Hall*
4/17 – Chicago, IL - Metro*
4/18 – St. Louis, MO - The Old Rock House*
4/20 – Columbia, MO - The Blue Note*
4/21 – Indianapolis, IN - Earth House*
4/22 – Detroit, MI - Magic Stick*
4/23 – Toronto, ON - Mod Club*
4/27 – Northampton, MA - Pearl Street*
4/28 – New Haven, CT - Toad's Place*
5/3 – Philadelphia, PA - Theatre of Living Arts*
5/5 – Washington, DC - 9:30 Club*
5/7 – Boston,MA - Paradise Rock Club*
5/8 – Albany, NY - TBD*
5/9 – Baltimore, MD - Ram's Head Live*
5/11 – Raleigh, NC - Lincoln Theatre*
5/12 – Charlotte, NC - Visulite Theatre*
5/13 – Atlanta, GA - The Loft*
5/14 – Tampa, FL - Crowbar*
5/15 – Orlando, FL - Firestone Live*
5/18 – Dallas, TX - Granada Theatre*
5/19 – Austin, TX - The Parish*
5/21 – Los Angeles, CA - Henry Fonda Theatre*
5/22 – San Diego, CA -TBD*
5/26 – San Francisco, CA - Great American Music Hall*
5/28 – Portland, OR - Hawthorne Theatre*

6/4 - Ozark, Arkansas - Wakarusa Festival
6/5 - Ozark, Arkansas - Wakarusa Festival

w/ Coheed and Cambria # w/ Ok Go *

Shy Blakeman To Release LONG DISTANCE MAN

Shy Blakeman, the Texas singer-songwriter with a colorful past and engaging character who was first introduced to audiences during the 2006 season of “Nashville Star,” is scheduled to release his third album LONG DISTANCE MAN today.

Influenced by the eclectic southern mixture representative of The Black Crowes, Waylon Jennings and Ray Charles, Blakeman succeeds in his efforts to break ground on a new sound by melding genres into an album that is equally pleasurable and viably commercial. This new venture allows the listener to go along for a ride with the “Long Distance Man” as he musically meanders through songs that cross the plains of Texas country at “Quarter to Three,” hears the blues and tastes the “Swamp Water Whisky” of Baton Rouge, dances all night in a few of the “So Many Honky Tonks” that decorate the true country landscape, and establishes roots at the Americana homestead that is “Dragon Fly.”

Produced by Ted Russell Kamp (Shooter Jennings) and Executively Produced by Warren Izard, the album also features a bevy of world class players who have graciously lent their time and talent to support the new project. Artists of note include Marc Ford (The Black Crowes), Audley Freed (The Black Crowes, Cry Love, Peter Frampton), Doug Pettibone (Lucinda Williams, Jewel), Kenny Vaughn (Steve Earle, Marty Stuart, Rodney Crowell), Michael Webb (John Fogerty), Jason Sutter (Chris Cornell), Ron Dziubla (Royal Crown Reveue, Ricky Martin), and Gia Ciambotti (Bruce Springsteen, Bonnie Raitt).

The rollicking title track was released to radio on February 23, 2010 and early commendations for the album are already rolling in. “I’ve been drowning in a sea of cookie-cutter music. Thank you Shy Blakeman for throwing me a life preserver [with] LONG DISTANCE MAN,” says Kelley Peterson of KHKX/KMCM/KQRX in Odessa, Texas.

Blakeman will be promoting his new album today during a performance at the Kinetic Entertainment "The Early Bird Gets The Music" showcase at Annie’s West, 706 W. 6th St. Austin, Texas. He has also been invited to perform for the CMT Awards after-party in Nashville, Tenn. Scheduled for June 9, 2010, this unofficial wrap-up to the CMA Music Fest activities will be hosted by Cowboy Troy, the 2006 and 2007 co-host of “Nashville Star.”

For more information visit: www.shyblakeman.com

YOKO ONO Climbs To Top 5 On The Billboard Club Play Charts

YOKO ONO continues to keep her fingers on the pulse of underground and commercial dance music with her new single, “GIVE ME SOMETHING” (THE REMIXES). Currently #4 (with a bullet) on the Billboard Club Play Chart (issue date: 03/27/2010), it is the latest offering in the pioneering avant-garde icon’s acclaimed remix series, that has spawned 5 #1 dance singles: “I’M NOT GETTING ENOUGH”, “GIVE PEACE A CHANCE”, “NO NO NO”, “EVERYMAN / EVERYWOMAN” and her seminal “WALKING ON THIN ICE”.

Since 2001, Yoko’s alter-electronic ego, ONO, has been pumping out revamped reworks of classics from her vast catalog for a new digital generation. Partnering with cutting edge producers and collaborators such as FLAMING LIPS, PET SHOP BOYS, BASEMENT JAXX, DANNY TENAGLIA, SPIRITUALIZED, CSS, FELIX DA HOUSECAT, ANTONY AND THE JOHNSONS and PEACHES, she has ingeniously added chart-topping dance-music heroine to her renowned status as controversial performance-art innovator and punk rock pioneer.

On the brilliant “Give Me Something” (originally taken from John and Yoko’s Grammy Award winning 1980 masterpiece DOUBLE FANTASY), ONO taps RICHARD MOREL, DAVE AUDE, RALPHI ROSARIO, ROBERTO RODRIGUEZSTONEBRIDGE, SPARKS, JUNIOR BOYS, ALEX TRAXX (and others) to deliver compelling interpretations for the 21st Century.

Slated as a green release (digital, no materials used or abused) later this month (March 2010) on MIND TRAIN / TWISTED Records, “GIVE ME SOMETHING” (THE REMIXES) is another irresistible reinvention from the timeless visionary, who continues to be a major influential force on the cultural landscape.

7 Walkers, featuring Bill Kreutzmann and Papa Mali, Announce Dates

Legendary drummer and co-founder of the Grateful Dead, Bill Kreutzmann, together with funky bluesman and voodoo electronic pioneer Papa Mali, officially unveil 7 Walkers’ spring plans. 7 Walkers, which also features bass virtuoso Reed Mathis (Tea Leaf Green, JFJO) and multi-instrumentalist Matt Hubbard (Willie Nelson and Friends), will stop at select markets and festivals through out the country, all in anticipation of a new album release. The complete list of currently confirmed tour dates is included below.

7 Walkers recently spent time at an Austin, Texas studio, recording an album to be released later this year. In addition to a brand-new batch of Robert Hunter (Grateful Dead and Bob Dylan lyricist) originals that were co-written with the band, the new album offers up favorites from the Grateful Dead repertoire, Papa Mali originals, and some New Orleans and Southern songbook interpretations. Overall, the result is a fiery and funky collection of tunes that quite brilliantly capture the unique collaboration between these two very different musical shamans.

Bill Kreutzmann (who played every show in the Grateful Dead’s illustrious 30 year career as well as The Dead incarnations since) first met funky Papa Mali at a festival in 2008. Bill recalls in a recent interview, “We first met at the Oregon Country Fair last year. He was the headliner on the main stage, and I sat there and watched him and went, ‘This guy's for real man, I like this guy.' Then we met, after that he came over to my trailer that I was staying in and you couldn't separate us, we talked for hours. It was just one of those natural things, you know? You can't plan it; You can't make it happen. And then we started playing together.”

Live audio recordings of the 7 Walkers can be heard at the newly re-launched www.billkreutzmann.com.

Meanwhile, at nugs.net, fans can now download live BK3 recordings from their 2009 Colorado shows. Another potent Kreutzmann musical project, BK3 first toured in 2008 and featured a rotating lineup including such players as guitarist Scott Murawski (Max Creek) and bassists James "Hutch" Hutchinson (Bonnie Raitt), Oteil Burbridge (Allman Brothers), and Mike Gordon (Phish).

Bill Kreutzmann is also working to support the efforts of University of California at Santa Cruz, who has committed to helping to archive all things Grateful Dead. As Kreutzmann explains, “I am incredibly happy that the kind archivists at UC Santa Cruz understand the social value of [the Grateful Dead’s] priceless archive, and its hallowed meaning to our most beloved ‘Dead Heads.’ Without the care it is now going to receive, these treasures would be lost.”

7 Walkers Spring/Summer Tour Dates:

(*Please note guest bass player George Porter Jr. will perform these dates with 7 Walkers)

Tuesday, April 6 Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., Big Room Chico CA
Wednesday, April 7 Red Fox Eureka CA
Thursday, April 8 Crystal Bay Club Crown Room Crystal Bay NV
Friday, April 9 Great American Music Hall San Francisco CA
Saturday, April 10 Moe's Alley Santa Cruz CA
Friday, April 16 Spirit of Suwanee Music Park Live Oak FL
Saturday, April 17 The Salt Lick Driftwood TX
Friday, April 30 Mahalia Jackson Theatre New Orleans, LA
Thursday, June 3 Wakarusa Festival Ozark AR
Friday, June 11 Sonoma County Fairgrounds Santa Rosa CA

Dierks Bentley @ Boulder Theater

Not so many years ago, he was singing for tips in Second Avenue bars and soaking up country music history at his day job working in the video tape library of the late, great Nashville Network. Today he's among the most successful and relevant country singers in the business. They say Nashville doesn't work like this anymore - that talented strivers with no connections don't stand a chance. But Dierks Bentley proved that Music City's engine still runs and that as a place for education, inspiration and validation, it has no parallel. Critics find him credible. Fans pack his shows. There are precious few new artists recording hits today about whom that can be said. Bentley's kind of country has never been straight-up-the-middle. Instead, the Arizona-native grew up on a potent hybrid of honky-tonk, bluegrass, singer/songwriters, classic country and modern rock & roll, forging his own sound along the way.

The Travelin’ McCourys do not stand still. They are on the road—and online—entertaining audiences with live shows that include some of the best musicians and singers from all genres. It’s always different, always exciting, and always great music. No other band today has the same credentials for playing traditional and progressive music. As the sons of bluegrass legend Del McCoury, Ronnie McCoury on mandolin and Rob McCoury on banjo continue their father’s work—a lifelong dedication to the power of bluegrass music to bring joy into people’s lives. And with fiddler Jason Carter and bassist Alan Bartram, the ensemble is loved and respected by the bluegrass faithful. But the band is now combining their sound with others to make something fresh and rejuvenating. It’s that attitude, backed up by talent, that marks great musicians, traditional or progressive. The Travelin’ McCourys are twenty-first century musical pilgrims and adventurers. They’re onto something new, just like Bill Monroe was in the 1940s, but now we can see and hear that adventure live or online.

Thursday April 22 8:00pm
AEG Live presents
DIERKS BENTLEY & THE TRAVELIN' McCOURYS, "UP ON THE RIDGE" TOUR
w/Hayes Carll
-
Tickets will be on sale through the Boulder Theater box office
Internet 24-7 at www.bouldertheater.com
Phone: During box office hours 303-786-7030