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The Felice Brothers Announce Spring Tour

The Felice Brothers have announced a new run of tour dates in the US, Australia, and New Zealand this spring, beginning in late March following a March 19th performance with Bright Eyes at Auditorium Shores during this year's SXSW festival in Austin, TX.

The first leg of the tour will kick off on March 25th at the Oneonta Theater in Oneonta, NY, and lead The Felice Brothers to Indio, CA, where they will make their debut appearance at the already sold-out Coachella festival on April 16th. The band will then travel to Australia and New Zealand for the first time, touring down under from April 20th through 24th to play shows that include Boogie Fest in Melbourne, AUS, and the Grassroots Festival in Auckland, NZL. The Felice Brothers will resume their US tour on April 28th at the Great American Music Hall in San Francisco, CA, and continue through May 6th at Lincoln Hall in Chicago, IL, with more dates to be confirmed shortly. Tickets for the US shows will begin to go on sale tomorrow, February 10th; for more information, please visit www.thefelicebrothers.com.

The Felice Brothers' most recent album, Yonder Is The Clock, was released in April 2009 and met with praise from Entertainment Weekly, Esquire, Filter, The New York Times, SPIN, and Time Out New York, among others.

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The Felice Brothers on tour:

MARCH 19 AUSTIN, TX AUDITORIUM SHORES (SXSW)

MARCH 25 ONEONTA, NY ONEONTA THEATER*

MARCH 26 HUDSON, NY HELSINKI ON THE HUDSON*

MARCH 27 HOBOKEN, NJ MAXWELL'S*

MARCH 30 PHILADELPHIA, PA FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH*

MARCH 31 WASHINGTON, DC ROCK AND ROLL HOTEL*

APRIL 1 HUNTINGTON, WV V CLUB*

APRIL 2 LEXINGTON, KY BUSTER'S BILLIARDS & BACKROOM*

APRIL 3 KNOXVILLE, TN RHYTHM 'N BLOOMS

APRIL 5 CHARLOTTE, NC VISUALITE THEATER*

APRIL 6 ATHENS, GA 40 WATT CLUB*

APRIL 7 NASHVILLE, TN EXIT/IN*

APRIL 8 BIRMINGHAM, AL THE BOTTLETREE*

APRIL 9 MEMPHIS, TN HI-TONE CAFÉ*

APRIL 10 DALLAS, TX THE LOFT*

APRIL 12 LUBBOCK, TX BLUE LIGHT*

APRIL 13 SANTA FE, NM CORAZON*

APRIL 16 INDIO, CA COACHELLA

APRIL 20 SYDNEY, AUS ANNANDALE HOTEL

APRIL 21 MELBOURNE, AUS THE PRINCE

APRIL 22 MELBOURNE, AUS BOOGIE FEST

APRIL 23 MEENYAN, AUS TOWN HALL

APRIL 24 AUCKLAND, NZL GRASSROOTS FESTIVAL

APRIL 28 SAN FRANCISCO, CA GREAT AMERICAN MUSIC HALL

APRIL 29 PORTLAND, OR MISSISSIPPI STUDIOS

APRIL 30 SEATTLE, WA TRACTOR TAVERN

MAY 2 SALT LAKE CITY, UT URBAN LOUNGE

MAY 3 DENVER, CO HIGH DIVE

MAY 4 OMAHA, NE THE WAITING ROOM

MAY 6 CHICAGO, IL LINCOLN HALL

* Diamond Doves supporting

Tony Adamo's What Is Hip

The recording of the song "What is Hip" on singer/songwriter, Tony Adamo's new CD (entitled WHAT IS HIP) came from a suggestion made by the legendary horn player and Tower of Power co-founder, Stephen "Doc" Kupka. During a recording session with Adamo and his producer/guitarist, Jerry Stucker, "Doc" suggested several TOP songs Adamo might want to cover. Adamo choose "What is Hip" and "This Time it's Real." Kupka, along with jazz great, Eddie Henderson hold up the horn section on "Hip." In the re-grooved "This Time It's Real," Mic Gillette, funk icon in his own right, wrote the horn arrangement and plays (trumpet & trombone) along with TOP horn member, Tom E. Poltzer (tenor sax). Poltzer plays lead solo with "Doc" Kupka on bari sax.

Talk about a kool struttin' and soul funkin' sound. Adamo is deep in the groove on these two Tower of Power hits. Producer/guitarist, Jerry Stucker loaded up the WHAT IS HIP CD with big city cool. Some of these great players include: Mike Clark (drums), Steve Gadd (drums), James Gadson (drums), Reggie McBride (bass), Richie Goods (bass), Freddie Washington (bass), Bill Summers (percussion), Robert Quintana (percussion), Blackbyrd McNight (guitar), Jerry Stucker (guitar), Neil Larsen (organ/piano), Rodney Franklin (piano), Melecio Magdaluyo (tenor sax/flute), Henry Hung (trumpet/trombone), and Sandy Griffith (background vocals).

Can you dig Adamo's new conception of voice n' funk with an infectious slice of soul? Get hip to WHAT IS HIP and be "souled" on the thirteen songs on his new CD.

WHAT IS HIP MP3's are now available on CDBABY and hard copies will be available at www.strokeland.com and CDBABY soon.
www.horndrivenradio.com will add songs into radio play

Telepathique To Release "All Your Lovers" EP

Brazilian band Telepathique started in 2006 as a duo (dj/drummer and singer) gigging in small clubs in Portugal, where they lived at the time, and around the electonic European scene. The power of their stage performance is pushed by Myle’s (singer/synth) hypnotic-sexy melodies and lyrics and Érico’s (drums/synth) live drums among programmed beats and scratches that soon took them to share stage with artists like Massive Attack, Hot Chip, Buraka, Diplo and PJ Harvey.
Guitar/synth player Mauricio Fleury joined the band just before their first North American tour in support of their debut album “Last Time on Earth” (The Control Group).  Later that year they returned to the US to tour with Tricky to play venues like House of Blues (Chicago), Trocadero (Philadelphia), Irving Plaza (NYC), and 9:30 Club (D.C).
Now they are back with a new EP, All Your Lovers. A step in a new direction from their early tracks that were made mainly with drum programming/guitar/voice, these new songs were recorded in the studio with live drums and feel analog synthesizers. The EP was produced, mixed and mastered by drummer Érico Theobaldo.

Time, NYT Laud Jake Shimabukuro

It's been a banner year thus far for Jake Shimabukuro. His new album 'Peace Love Ukulele' (HITCHHIKE RECORDS) debuted at #1 on the Billboard World Album chart, and has brought the Hawaii native national acclaim from NPR, YouTube and others. Time Magazine and the New York Times can now be added to the list in praise of Shimabukuro's virtuosic ukulele playing.

Nate Chinen of the New York Times said of a recent performance Shimabukuro at Brooklyn Bowl:

"Shimabukuro… comes by his fame with buoyant musicianship and brisk proficiency. The innovation in his style stems from an embrace of restrictions: the ukulele has only four strings and a limited range. He compensates with an adaptable combination of rhythmic strumming, classical-style finger-picking and fredboard tapping."

Read the entire review here.

Shimabukuro and his ukulele are also featured in a Time Magazine article by Tim Morrison about the instrument and its sudden surge in popularity. Morrison notes that a quick Google search of ukulele "won't be some grainy clip of Tiny Tim or George Formby but a performance by a hair-gelled 34-year-old Hawaiian named Jake Shimabukuro."

Read the Time Magazine piece here.

Read Grateful Web coverage of Jake here.

John Prine at the Boulder Theater - 03.25.11

97.3 KBCO & the Daily Camera are proud to present John Prine at the Boulder Theater on Friday, March 25th, 2011.

The first time he got onstage to perform – at a Chicago open mic night – there was absolute silence. Here comes a guy nobody had ever seen, a mailman from nearby Maywood, and the very first songs he ever sings are miracles, songs like “Hello In There” and “Angel from Montgomery.” But this stunned silence spelled disaster to Prine. “They just sat there,” he said. “They didn’t even applaud, they just looked at me. I thought, `Uh oh. This is pretty bad.’ I started shuffling my feet and looking around. And then they started applauding and it was a really great feeling. It was like I found out all of a sudden that I could communicate deep feelings and emotions. And to find that out all at once was amazing.”

That one night changed his life. The club-owner offered him a gig, and from that moment on he quickly became one of Chicago’s most beloved local heroes, a guy who would honor the Windy City with as much love and grace as Studs Terkel and Carl Sandburg. Prine soon befriended another local hero, Steve Goodman, and with Goodman he met the world. Kris Kristofferson heard his songs, helped him land a record deal, and soon everyone knew what Chicago already did, that Prine was the real deal. From that first album on, he came known as a genuine “songwriter’s songwriter,” one of the rare ones who writes the songs other songwriters would sell their souls for.  Evidence of this is the long list of songwriters who have recorded his songs, including Johnny Cash, Bonnie Raitt, the Everly Brothers, John Denver, Kris Kristofferson, Carly Simon, Ben Harper, Joan Baez, and many others. Even Bob Dylan was stunned. “His stuff is pure Proustian existentialism,” said Bob Dylan.  . “He’s so good,” said Kristofferson, “we’re gonna have to break his fingers.”

Dylan and the rest were simply recognizing that which we have all come to know, that Prine’s songs are so hauntingly evocative of the laughter and tears inherent in the human condition, so purely precise and finely etched, that lines from them linger in our hearts and minds like dreams, separate from the songs. There’s the rodeo poster from “Angel from Montgomery,” the hole in daddy’s arm and the broken radio (from “Sam Stone”), the old trees that just grow stronger (from “Hello In There.”) The kinds of lines you carry around in your pocket, knowing they’re in there when you need them. With a staggering penchant for detail, a proclivity to be both hilarious and deeply serious (and often in the same song), and a visceral embrace  of roots music, he’s  made the kinds of songs nobody ever dreamed of before, or since.

Born on October 10th, 1946 in Maywood, he grew up spinning Roy Acuff and Hank Williams 78s in his dad’s collection, as well as tuning into WJJD to hear Webb Pierce, Lefty Frizell and others “back to back, all night long.” And then a new kind of music arrived: “I was coming of age just as rock and roll was invented,” he said, and along with his country heroes he added Elvis, Little Richard, Fats Domino, and the one he loved the most, Chuck Berry: “Because he told a story in less than three minutes.”

At 14 he started playing guitar and never stopped, starting with old folk tunes taught to him by his brother Dave. After high school he enlisted in the army, and was happy to be stationed in Germany, far from Viet Nam. He spent most of his time in the barracks playing guitar and singing Lefty Frizzell and Hank Williams songs with a friend.After the army, he became a mailman, which he loved because he could write songs while walking his familiar route. “It was like a library with no books,” he said.

He haunted the fringes of Chicago open mic nights, mostly at the old Fifth Peg on Armitage in Old Town. Once he summoned up the courage to perform, although terrified, he knew he was home. The rest is singer-songwriter history. It was 1971, the dream of the Sixties was over and Goodman and Prine emerged with a new kind of song, eschewing abstractions to write story songs about real people:  “Midwestern mindtrips to the nth degree,” as Dylan put it. Songs with the concrete details and imagery of a novel, but compounded, like Prine’s hero Chuck Berry’s songs, into mini-masterpieces.

After landing his first gig, he went home and wrote more masterpieces that made up his first self-titled debut, released in 1971. It was received with near-unanimous raves: “… absolutely one of the greatest albums ever made,” wrote a hometown paper, “by one of the most creative and evocative songwriters of our time.” There was the recognition then, which has been confirmed by the passage of time, that even among the best, he stood out. “Good songwriters are on the rise,” wrote Rolling Stone, “but John is differently good.”

Fans hungry for meaningful new music discovered him, unconcerned if he was the “new Dylan” or not, as he was often labeled, but drawn to the complex simplicity of his songs, the heady amalgam of sorrow and whimsy. Always seeking to strike a balance in his work, Prine said he wrote funny songs so as to get back to the tragic ones.

He made eight albums on two major labels, including Sweet Revenge, Common Sense, and Bruised Orange. In 1980 he moved to Nashville, and with longtime manager Al Bunetta, formed his own label, Oh Boy Records in 1981. They’ve since released a chain of great records, including 1991’s Grammy-winning The Missing Years, which featured cameos by Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty. In 2000 he recaptured his own legacy by recording Souvenirs, new recordings of many of his classic songs.

In 1998 he was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer centered in his neck. The removal of a tumor and subsequent radiation seems to have eradicated it completely. Although his singing voice was lowered significantly, he faced his illness with the same blend of wistful humor he instills in his songs. In a post-surgery letter to his fans, he wrote, “Hopefully my neck is looking forward to its job of holding my head up above my shoulders.”

Now he’s back with a brand new live album, John Prine: In Person & On Stage, which contains both solo and duet renditions of some of early songs such as “Angel From Montgomery” (here in a breathtaking duet with Emmylou Harris) as well as later classics such as “Unwed Fathers” (with Iris DeMent) and one of the most poignant songs ever from a husband to a wife, “She Is My Everything.”

“If he’s this good this young,” wrote Rolling Stone in 1971, “time should be on his side.” Truer words have rarely been written. Some four decades since his remarkable debut, Prine has stayed at the top of his game, both as a performer and songwriter. Recently honored at the Library of Congress, he has been elevated from the annals of songwriters into the realm of bonafide American treasures.  Poet Laureate Ted Kooser introduced him at the Library of Congress by likening him to Raymond Carver for making “monuments of ordinary lives.” But the greatest testaments to his lasting legacy are the songs themselves. Unlike so many which belong only to the time in which they emerged, his, like the old trees in “Hello In There,” seem to just grow stronger with the passing years.

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Tickets are on sale at Boulder Theater Box Office. Call (303) 786-7030 for tickets by phone.

Tickets are also available through our website @ www.bouldertheater.com.

Tickets are On Sale Saturday, February 5th!

$40 GA / $48.50 Res / $65 Gold Circle

Beat Kaestli & Elizabeth Lohninger @ The Zinc

On January 24th, NYC witnessed its coldest day in six years with high forecasts for the day in low teens. While the city's wiser residents spent their night coddled in sweaters and blankets, a select few decided to brave their way into Greenwich Village and attend Zinc Bar for a night of blood-tempering jazz and booze.

LivePhish Limited Released Today

On Sunday June 27, 2010, Phish played their sixth headline show (since 1998) at Merriweather Post Pavilion and the second show of a two-night stand to a hot, sticky summer crowd.  Merriweather Post is a wooden-roofed music amphitheater designed by Frank Gehry with excellent acoustics and a capacity of about 19,000.  The band opened set one with "Walfredo" which includes lyrics about Phish's first visit to the venue opening for Santana in 1992.  This rarity, performed only a half dozen times and for the first time in a decade, began a string of breakouts.  The number two spot featured Bob Marley's "Mellow Mood" (played for the first time since 2003’s IT festival), "Divided Sky" and 2010's first "Tela".  A couple more covers, Clifton Chenier's Bayou swinging "My Soul" and Norman Blake's "Ginseng Sullivan", were clustered mid-set along with "Sample In A Jar."  Set one wrapped up with "Brian And Robert" - bookended by Phish classics "Bathtub Gin" and "Run Like An Antelope", the latter of which contained teases of "Brian And Robert."  Set two was a seamless affair rooted in the show's theme song, "Saw It Again" (also played at Merriweather for the first time since IT).  This playful set hinged on exploratory playing and transitions like "Meatstick" > "Saw It Again" > "Piper" > "Ghost" which, like the rest of the set included deft teases of "Saw It Again".  Phish sealed the fate of this uncommon set by weaving their debut of the Rolling Stones' "Jumpin' Jack Flash" back into "Saw It Again".  The remainder of the show: "Contact", "You Enjoy Myself" (with teases of "Jumpin' Jack Flash") and Jimi Hendrix's "Fire" also included multiple nods to "Saw it Again" among its sonic treasures.

Listen to Meatstick > Saw It Again

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On Saturday July 3, 2010, Phish returned to the Atlanta area for the first time since 2003 to begin the final two-night stand of Leg 1 of their summer tour.  Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre at Encore Park is a general-admission multi-purpose amphitheater with a capacity of about 12,000.  Phish had played this exact date in Atlanta eleven years ago in 1999.  The band kicked off the show with "Character Zero" and the only "Destiny Unbound" of Leg 1, followed by "Rift".  A request from the audience earned a trip to Gamehendge for "McGrupp And The Watchful Hosemasters" before a concentrated "Bathtub Gin" and the year's first "Mountains In The Mist".  The combination of "NICU" > "Gumbo" > "My Sweet One" spotlighted Page (aka "Leon") and Fish, who penned the latter two songs.  Set one concluded with "Stealing Time From The Faulty Plan",  "Strange Design”, the only "Sanity" of summer and "Run Like An Antelope" to close the set.  Set two began with an opening sequence of the The Velvet Underground's "Rock And Roll" > "Prince Caspian” (with a jam that entered "Dave's Energy Guide" territory) > "Tweezer" > "Slave To The Traffic Light".  This sublime Tweezer/Slave combination was featured on LiveBait Vol. 02.  Set two continued with "Bouncing Around The Room" > "Possum" and "Backwards Down The Number Line" > "Harry Hood" > "Loving Cup".  The Encore, "Sleeping Monkey" > "Tweezer Reprise", capped a great first performance at Alpharetta.

Listen to Bathtub Gin

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On Sunday July 4, 2010, Phish celebrated their second Independence Day in the Atlanta area (they played Lakewood Amphitheatre July 3 and 4, 1999).  The second show of a two-night stand and the last show of Summer Leg 1 began appropriately with an A capella performance of "The Star-Spangled Banner" followed by a return to Gamehendge for "Punch You In The Eye" > "Colonel Forbin's Ascent" > "Fly Famous Mockingbird"(narration-free except for Trey pointing out the Mockingbird).  Next came some animal songs in the form of "Camel Walk" and "Ocelot" before a three-song combination of "Heavy Things" > "My Friend, My Friend" > "Lawn Boy" after which the rowdy crowd began to chant "USA, USA."  Set one concluded with "David Bowie" and a fiery "Gotta Jibboo".  After more patriotic chanting by the crowd, Phish kicked off a mostly non-stop set two with "Down With Disease" > "Piper" > "Ghost" > "Waste" > "Julius".  "Mike's Song" > "Tela" was next and was the first and only time in nearly fifteen years that these two songs were paired this way.  After an Independence Day greeting from Trey, the band dropped into the year's only performance of "Harpua".  Trey used his holiday "Harpua" narration to educate Atlanteans and visitors alike about "the history of our country as we know it", pointing out that both the real and alternative history books in schools are full of lies.  Instead, he explained, the nation's true history is to be found within Phish's music.  This rap led perfectly into the band's first and only performance of Rage Against The Machine's "Killing In The Name", sung by Fish with all the spirit of the holiday.  A burst of energy from the crowd acknowledged the message was received.  "Killing in The Name" returned to "Harpua" > "Weekapaug Groove", capping this unique Mike's Groove.  The instrumental "First Tube" filled the Encore slot, closing Leg 1.

Listen to Gotta Jibboo

Jon Hardy & the Public to release 'A Hard Year'

Acclaimed purveyors of resonating Americana, Jon Hardy & the Public prepare for the January 25 release of a new stand-out EPA Hard Year - continuing their tradition of being St. Louis' "best kept secret" and announce a very special hometown show to celebrate!

Jon Hardy’s voice is deep and true, expressing yearning, pain, and triumph all at the same time. The St. Louis singer/songwriter and his band, The Public, make music that has bowled over critics at outlets like NPR, No Depression and hometown weekly Riverfront Times. “I asked fellow music writer Roy Kasten to name a better song than Hardy’s ‘Cassius Clay’ to come out of St. Louis since Uncle Tupelo’s ‘Gun,’” wrote that paper’s Christian Schaefer. “He couldn’t.”

Indeed, the group’s Americana-rooted sound often draws comparisons to Jeff Tweedy and Jay Farrar’s early work, though it also incorporates horn-driven soul and stomping, anthemic rock a la Bruce Springsteen. Also featuring Glenn Labarre on lead guitar, Johnny Kidd on keyboards, Greg Shadwick on bass and Mike Schurk on drums, The Public are also influenced by Randy Newman, and released a four song cover EP of his tracks called Little Criminals. “There’s something in his voice that gives me the impression that he’s on the outside looking in, that he’s not invited to the party,” says Hardy. “His songs are comforting and troubling all at the same time.”

This uneasy combination was recently featured as NPR’s Song of the Day with the single “Worst I Ever Had”. “Brilliantly capturing that desperate feeling lying somewhere between lust and fear,” wrote NPR’s Ben Westhoff, “the group shows why they probably won’t be simply regional favorites for much longer.”

The two EPs followed the group’s 2005 debut Make Me Like Gold, which No Depression writer Ed Ward said was “about as original as any grass-roots recording by a guitar-based band is going to get at this late date” and their 2007 disc Working In Love. That album featured the show-stopping “Cassius Clay” and songs concerning Hardy’s recent divorce; in many ways the album was a letter to his ex-wife. “That was the best way I knew to tell her what I was thinking and feeling,” he says.
In recent years, Jon Hardy & The Public have performed with acclaimed acts including Okkervil River, The Avett Brothers, White Denim, John Vanderslice, Pernice Brothers and White Rabbits and drawn comparisons to Spoon. Their music has been played on college and community radio stations from coast to coast.
Hardy was raised in Webster Groves, just outside of St. Louis, by a Presbyterian preacher father and a mother whose work included substitute teaching. “It was a strange mix of liberal and conservative,” Hardy says. “My dad would always spend time reading to us about the civil rights movement. At the same time, TV was not smiled upon and music was carefully reviewed.” Having grown up on his parents’ classic rock and pop records, he taught himself guitar largely from listening to blues players like Lightnin’ Hopkins and B.B. King on local radio.
His first band was a power pop outfit called Shelby. “I remember I was very afraid of being in front of people and performing,” he says. “I don’t know that I’ve completely gotten over it.” An odd thing to say, as Jon Hardy & The Public’s shows have the inspirational quality of a revival meeting worthy of his father. Often featuring a full horns section and a faithful cover of Springsteen’s “Rosalita (Come Out Tonight),” they are largely responsible for the band’s considerable grassroots following in the Midwest.
Shadwick joined the group not long before he and Hardy were laid off from their jobs. He joined Labarre (a former fan of the band who came aboard shortly after Make Me Like Gold), Kidd (who brought a soul and pop aesthetic to the group) and Schurk, who answered a craigslist ad and bested other potential stickmen in a try-out. All five members collaborate on their albums’ stunning production, which highlights each member’s considerable musicianship without sacrificing their raw power.
Hardy makes it clear that he and The Public are dedicated to making quality tracks that stand the test of time. “We all still have to work other jobs to pay the bills, and in the meantime we’re trying to create good music,” he says. He’s also firmly rooted in his community, penning songs largely for himself and his friends. It just so happens that these tunes -- in all their rumbling power -- resonate with folks he’s never met. A sound as big as theirs, it turns out, has a hard time being contained.

Emmitt-Nershi Band Announces New Bassist

With Tyler Grant recently announcing his departure from the Emmitt-Nershi Band fans have been anxiously awaiting the announcement of the new bass player for the band.  Today the Emmitt-Nershi Band website and facebook will be making the announcement that Johnny Grubb of Railroad Earth will be filling the spot.  Throughout Johnny's 7 years with Railroad Earth he had played with Billy Nershi on many occasions opening up the doors for this opportunity.  The bands lineup change is effective as of now and all upcoming dates will be played with Drew Emmitt (mandolin/vocals), Billy Nershi (guitar/vocals), Andy Torn (banjo) and Johnny Grubb (bass).  Below is the official announcement that will be posted on the webpage and facebook from Johnny.

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Hello, World!  Rather than make someone else come up with an announcement for who the new bassist will be, I thought I'd try to follow in Tyler's gracious footsteps and do it myself.

My name is Johnny Grubb.  I went to school at Appalachian State University and saw Leftover Salmon many, many times my first couple of years there.  After ASU, I spent a good year rolling burritos, washing dishes and playing bluegrass in my hometown of Atlanta before serendipitously running into John Skehan of Railroad Earth one night at a gig of ours.  They just happened to be on the lookout for a new bassist and long story short, I spent 7 years in that band, playing several metric tons of great music and meeting lots of great folks all over the country.

One of the folks I met and had the good fortune of playing with on many occasions was Mr. Billy Nershi.  RRE was signed to SCI Fidelity Records for a number of years and we got to be friends with a bunch of the SCI/Mad House folks in time.  RRE always was and still is a full-time commitment. I just couldn't keep it up with the birth of my second boy last January, so I bowed out a year ago and spent this past year getting a web development consultancy off the ground, getting to know the virtues and vices of the various open source software scenes out there and being home with my wife and boys for the first time ever.  The itch to play some bass didn't come back until just a few months ago after getting into the most recent Larry Keel and Stringduster's CDs.

In any event, I cruised by this website last month to see what they were working with from a technical standpoint.  The meaning of Tyler's announcement that he was leaving didn't really hit me until the next day, at least not the part where I should give Billy a call and see who they have lined up.  I wasn't looking for another full-time gig, nor to be in another rock band per se, so after speaking with Billy and Drew it seemed like the parameters were pretty well lined up for everybody and here I am!

Just to put a bow on top of everything, I met Andy years ago when he was with Larry Keel and didn't find out until the last few weeks that he was a member of the Broke Mountain Bluegrass band with Travis from the Infamous Stringdusters and my good friend Anders from Greensky Bluegrass.  It's nice to be a part of this small world and I want to thank my new bandmates for having me aboard.  I will see you all soon.

Nightmares For A Week Announce Tour Dates

It all started out with a couple cases of beer, a back porch, and a few old friends. In the hot, muggy summer of 2008, longtime friends and former band mates Sean-Paul Pillsworth and Bill Manley decided it was time to pick up their dusty guitars and start writing music together again. It wasn't long until they recruited ex-Astronauts drummer Steve Markota, and the resulting chemistry was undeniable.

The trio played a packed hometown show, and in months they were traveling far from their native Kingston, NY, playing nearly every weekend. They kept getting called back, each time with bigger and more enthusiastic performances to match the crowds. A year went by so fast. They released their debut EP, A Flood Tomorrow, produced by studio pro John Naclerio (My Chemical Romance, Senses Fail, Polar Bear Club) at Nada Studios in New Windsor, NY. After releasing the CD on friend-run imprint Music for End Times, Naclerio signed the band to his own Broken English record label for digital distribution.

In June of 2010 the band reentered Nada Studios as free agents to record their full-length debut. In addition to a brand new album, the band also came out of the studio with a brand new label, Brooklyn-based Academy Fight Song. Their full-length entitled “Don’t Die” is out now. Nightmares for a Week will be touring the country in support of the new album, full US tour dates coming soon.

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Nightmares For A Week Live!

Jan 14 California Brew Haus Rochester, New York
Jan 15 The Tuscan Cafe Warwick, New York
Jan 21 Cravings Goshen, New York
Jan 22 Deer Park Community Center Deer Park, New York w/ Koji
Jan 28 King Killer Studios Brooklyn, New York
Feb 5 Bacchus New Paltz, New York
Feb 11 Valentine’s Albany, New York w/ Iron Chic
Feb 25 The Basement Kingston, New York w/ After the Fall
Feb 26 Valentine’s Albany, New York
Mar 1 The Saint Asbury Park, New Jersey
Mar 20 Trash Bar Brooklyn, New York

+ Full US Tour Dates Coming Soon!