guitar

Country Mice Announce Summer Tour Dates

What does Country Mice front-man Jason Rueger have in common with less than 300 people in the US?  Growing up in Beattie, that’s ruralest of rural Kansas. On a farm of course, that was passed down through three generations of his family and old enough to be on the Pony Express route. “Family, friends, and working the land gave us a good wholesome life”.
Walking dirt road paths, working and living off the land, squinting his eyes at the sun, but with headphones on, it is not the bucolic atmosphere but music that most inspires him.  At an early age, Rueger sets his sights for something different than the surrounding dirt and milo that stung his eyes and cut his hands.
Breaking away from the close-knit ties of friends and family, Rueger moves east, not to Nashville, where you might expect a country boy to venture, but to Brooklyn.  It doesn’t take long to hook up with fellow Midwest transplants Ben Bullington (guitar) and Kurt Kuehn (drums) as they all quickly band together, finding comfort in their shared sense of displacement.  Eventually, as the trio becomes more assimilated to their new surroundings, they recruit upstate New Yorker Mike Feldman (bass).
As Country Mice, they rally together to craft apocalyptic ballads through amplifier hazes that thicken into funnel clouds, drums that stomp-clap sedately before the storm peaks, and bass tones that thicken the bloodstream. Rueger draws on his small town rearing with sophistication beyond the ordinarily romantic and reductive Americana troubadour, and his songwriting is anything but dime a dozen.
Strong traces of Neil Young and Wilco are mixed into modern experimental guitar sounds that any fan of mid-90’s Sonic Youth and Dinosaur Jr. will love. Living and gigging in Brooklyn, Country Mice begin to fully develop their sound, which becomes by influenced the other hardworking bands of Brooklyn's fast-paced scene.
Their debut album Twister is out now.It's a record that sonically chisels through the calloused shell of glossy rock & roll to find the dissonant live wire beneath and play it for all its worth. It tells a tale of strained memory: the hardships, joys, and love of growing up in a small town in the Midwest, with the hopes and dreams of traveling the world – a record for every kid seeing the big world from his small bedroom window.
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Summer Tour Dates:
July 5 Brooklyn, NY @ Glasslands
July 9 Brooklyn NY @ Cameo Gallery
July 13 Rochester, NY @ Bug Jar
July 15 Chicago, IL @ Cal's Bar
July 16 N. Manchester, IN @ The Firehouse
July 17 Indianapolis, IN @ Melody Inn
July 18 Louisville, KY @ Sunergos
July 19 Little Rock, AR @ Vino's
July 20 Mobile, AL @ Alabama Music Box
July 21 San Antonio, TX @ Limelight
July 22 Austin, TX @ Stubb's
July 23 Oklahoma City, OK @ Blue Note Lounge
July 24 Tulsa, OK @ Sound Pony
July 25 Kansas City, MO @ The Riot Room
July 26 Columbia, MO @ Mojo's
July 27 St. Louis, MO @ Ciceros
July 28 Cincinnati, OH @ Southgate House
July 29 Atlanta, GA @ The Drunken Unicorn
July 30 Savanna, GA @ The Jinx
July 31 Durham, NC @ The Pinhook
Aug. 1 Philadelphia, PA @ Kung Fu Necktie

Adrian Belew Power Trio ft. members of King Crimson at Boulder Theater

Boulder Weekly is proud to present Adrian Belew Power Trio with Stickmen featuring Tony Levin and Pat Mastelotto from King Crimson at the Boulder Theater on Tuesday, October 11th, 2011.  Tickets go on sale Friday, June 24th for $25 General Admission, $30 Reserved and $40 Gold Circle.

“2 of a Perfect Trio” Tour

King Crimson players Adrian Belew, Tony Levin and Pat Mastelotto keep very busy individually when Crimson's not active, but now, a historic joint tour: Adrian Belew Power Trio will headline the bill, with Stick Men (featuring Tony and Pat) opening.

And of course, how could they resist joining together for a Crim-centric extended encore - after their respective sets we'll see them reconfigure as Ade/Tony/Pat trio, morphing into the double trio lineup like King Crimson featured in the 90's.

The tour name, 2 of a Perfect Trio, harkens to the King Crimson song "3 of a Perfect Pair"

Adrian Belew's trio features the amazing bassist Julie Slick, and NYC drummer Tobias Ralph - perfect complements to Belew's extraordinary guitar playing and singing.

Stick Men presents Tony Levin's virtuosic playing on the Chapman Stick, with Pat Mastelotto giving his unique progressive drumming on both acoustic and electronic drums. Markus Reuter rounds out the band, playing his self-designed touch style guitar.

For more information please visit www.adrianbelew.net

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Adrian Belew Power Trio

with Stickmen ft. Tony Levin & Pat Mastelotto from King Crimson

Boulder Theater

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

Doors:  6:30 pm

Show Time:  7:30 pm

Paper Bird w/ Dovekins at the Boulder Theater

97.3 KBCO & Westword are proud to present Paper Bird with Dovekins at the Boulder Theater on Thursday, September 8th, 2011.  Tickets go on sale Friday, June 24th for $14 General Admission tickets.

Paper Bird’s backbone is their songwriting, musicianship and a general allergy to all limitations and trends. With seven members and no leader, this band is pulled in every direction imaginable, but thanks to their unique instrumentation they are able to merge their spontaneous creativity into one, solid sound.

The members of the band- Sarah Anderson, vocals and trumpet; sisters Esmé and Genny Patterson, vocals; Tyler Archuletta, trombone; Paul DeHaven, guitar; Caleb Summeril, banjo; Macon Terry, upright bass – bring a Folk, Americana sound that pays homage to the American Bandstand of the 1950’s, with a hint of Roaring 20’s flare. But don’t be thrown off by their old-timey sound, Paper Bird maintains the Indie rock image and resonance of the current age with a progressive and complex style that keeps them on the forefront of the music scene. The band’s inception came a few years ago in Breckenridge, Colorado where they met for the first time. The members were busking in the streets where they earned a couple hundred dollars, bought some beers and dinner and decided to form a band. Shortly after they went into the studio and recorded their first self-released album Anything Nameless and Joymaking (2007), which has been a top selling record in local retail stores since its release.

The seven-piece Americana Folk band is boasted by three female lead singers and backed by outstandingly talented musicians, continually capture the hearts of new and old listeners. They were recently featured on NPR’s All Things Considered due their rare and beautiful approach to music. They were voted in the Top 10 Best Underground Bands by Denver Post two years in a row. In the last year they have played Red Rocks Amphitheater to over 8000 people and have shared the stage with Devotchka, These United States, Grace Potter & the Nocturnals, Brett Dennen, and Big Head Todd & the Monsters. Their haunting and authentic sound is a refreshing and breath taking experience.

The female vocals create a soulful, dynamic harmony that accentuates each singer, while giving the illusion of a single voice. The trombone, banjo, and guitar elevate the music to a higher level while the skilled notes of the bass reflect the harmonies. Each style bounces off the other, while each note appreciates the other. They make audiences feel love, excitement, and passion. A show not to be missed, a band that must be heard: Paper Bird is one of a kind.

Also, appearing is Dovekins who is made up of six goonish characters that are fun-loving and appreciate a good time.  Their shows have a range of instruments including stand-up bass, accordion, clarinet, piano, mandolin, trombone, banjo, tuba, spoons and washboard.  A psychedelic hoe-down may ensue.

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Paper Bird w/ Dovekins

& Spirits Of The Red City and The Claptet

Boulder Theater

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Thursday, September 8th, 2011

Doors:  7:00 pm

Show Time:  7:30 pm

Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. | Hi-Dive | Denver, CO

Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. took the stage last night at the Hi-Dive in Denver clearly on a mission from God. Wearing their traditional Nascar-style track jumpsuits and big ol mesh trucker caps, the Detroit duo of Josh Epstein and Daniel Zott made their debut in the great city of Denver on a tour supporting the release of their debut album, It’s a Corporate World.

The Motet: Funk Is Dead @ Boulder Theater

Z2 Entertainment is proud to present The Motet:  Funk Is Dead Performing the music of the Grateful Dead at the Boulder Theater on Monday, October 31st. Tickets go on sale Friday, June 17th at 10:00am.

The Motet is extremely excited to announce that for Halloween 2011 they will be paying tribute to the music of one of the most influential rock bands of the last 40 years: THE GRATEFUL DEAD!

How does the Grateful Dead’s sound fit into the energy and vibe of a Motet Halloween show?  They will be taking the challenge of reworking those epic and timeless songs with the energetic afro-funk grooves that you come to expect from The Motet…..hence the title “Funk is Dead!”

In addition to the slamming rhythm section of Dave Watts (drums), Garrett Sayers (bass), Joey Porter (keys), Ryan Jalbert (guitar), Scott Messersmith (percussion) and Dan Schwindt (guitar), they will be bringing in 3 of their great vocalists:  Jans Ingber, Paul Creighton and Kim Dawson.  Also, they will be showcasing a trio of horns (who’s ever played the Grateful Dead with a horn section?!):  Gabe Mervine (trumpet), Matt Pitts (tenor) and Pete Wall (bari)>

The boys are certain that these are going to go down in Motet Halloween history as some of the most exciting and creative shows they have ever put together!! Make sure to get your tickets soon so you don’t find yourself at the concert with your finger in the air looking for a funky miracle!

For more information please visit www.themotet.net

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The Motet Presents Funk Is Dead

Boulder Theater

Monday, October 31st

Doors:  8:00 pm

Show Time:  8:30 pm

William Topley at the Fox Theatre - 09.10.11

Z2 Entertainment is proud to present William Topley at the Fox Theatre on Saturday, September 10th.  Tickets go on sale Friday, June 10th for $32.50 in advance and $35 day of show.

Emerging from the swamps of The Blessing and ploughing through the rocky Blues of his solo albums, William Topley delivers an album of acoustic tunes dripping with imagery from across the globe.  Anchored by William’s unique vocal, once praised by legendary Muscle Shoals producer Barry Beckett as the “best he’d ever worked with,” and accompanied by the muscular acoustic guitar of long time musical associtate, Luke Brighty with additional vocals and sterling support from Dorie Jackson, Water Taxi lures you into a world of acoustic wonder.  The track listing features something old, lots of new and all wrapped up in lush vocals, tight harmonies and rich guitar plucking to give you a well rounded and substantial musical feast.  Once again William draws on his traveled past and veracious appetite for new places and adventures to take the listener on a journey that will transport you from the mundane and humdrum to exotic climes on a with dangerous women and liquor, without leaving the comfort of your home.

Water Taxi features acoustic versions of two of William’s back catalogue namely Delta Rain from The Blessing’s first record, Prince of Deep Water and Sweetheart from their second record, Locusts and Wild Honey, which will be familiar to current William fans.  The album starts with Hummingbird (co-write with leading Nashville writer Daryl Burgess), followed by Stony Ground with a lyric delivered from a window staring moment from the back of William’s house.  Water Taxi relates the tale of William’s journeys from the Bahamas to Denver and Trouble Comes At Night is a diary from the last band tour he undertook in the US.  Spanish Waters continues William’s exploration of John Masefiel’s poetry and Watch The Wall is another Hemmingway style adventure, co-written with Toby Tyler.  After Delta Rain, I’ll Be Gone feature Luke on Spanish guitar and the mood abruptly shifts for Luck Don’t Change, which is a minute of Acapella, which should be longer.  Don’t Do That No More is another co-write with Gary Nicholson and Delbert McLinton, which runs into Sweetheart and brings the album to a conclusion.

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William Topley

Fox Theatre

Saturday, September 10th

Doors:  8:30 pm

Show Time:  9:00 pm

Blues & Roots: Vieux Farka Toure w/ William Elliott Whitmore

It was a pretty quiet night on the hill in Boulder, CO at the Fox Theater, even though it was the beginning of the 1st annual Boulder Blues and Roots Summit Festival.  This festival featured early shows at the

Keller Williams Donates Godin Guitar, Special Prizes to Mimi Fishman Auction

Virginia native Keller Williams today launches an online auction at www.mimifishman.org/auctions to benefit his southern neighbors who were impacted by the recent tornados that tore through the region. Hosted by the Mimi Fishman Foundation, the public can bid on a Godin Guitar cherished by Keller, a Golf Cart Ride and VIP Ticket upgrade at the upcoming Summer Camp Festival, and a Keller Williams “Season Pass.” 100% of the money raised will go directly to tornado victims, with Keller and each winner deciding together the specific recipient organization. For additional details and to bid, visit http://www.mimifishman.org/auctions/.

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A word from Keller about the auction (April 20, 2011):

As I watched the dreamy royal wedding, I couldn’t help thinking of the nightmare that was happening in the southeast. The devastation from the tornados left me wanting to help in any way possible. So, in addition to a couple other items, I'm auctioning off my Godin Multiac fretless guitar with synthe access. Her name is "lil' sexy." Please check out “Lil' Sexy Blues" from the Dream record featuring Sanjay Mishra on guitar, Samir Chatterjee on tablas, and me playing this guitar. It has nylon strings and sounds like a warm classical that's being played with a slide except your fingers are doing the sliding as there are no frets. The fret lines are in place so it plays easily. With a fretless, you simply press the string on the fretline for the proper note to be in tune. It’s a guitar player’s guitar. It’s not a cowboy chord guitar you sit back and strum tunes around the campfire. It’s a thin body guitar, but slightly thicker than an electric. It’s super sexy. The pick up system is very elaborate with many options. Each string sits in its own cradle. The signal is split two ways and has two separate out puts. One is a regular quarter inch guitar cable that controls the acoustic sounds with volume, treble, mid, and bass control faders. The other is a 13 pin gk cable that goes to the Roland guitar synthesizer. This unit is not included. But it’s bad ass. Hours of entertainment can be had with a plethora of different sounds. My favorites were the trumpet and fiddle. I would tune the guitar to chord and slide around the low notes on the trumpet patch and would sound like a sexy trombone with no spit. The fiddle is way more realistic sounding with the fretless aspect. Although it’s a thin body, there is a small acoustic port up by the controls that allows you to play and hear her in all her sexiness with out any amplification. I’m letting her go because she was a one song a show guitar. Then when I started flying so much and had to choose who goes and who stays, I obviously chose the guitars I play the most. She is a luxury, specialty that deserves to be played.

For more from Keller and to bid in the auction, visit www.mimifishman.org.

David Bromberg's USE ME Tapes Friends

When David Bromberg, one of America’s finest roots musicians, emerged from a recording hiatus of 17 years with the solo, acoustic, traditional folk-blues album Try Me One More Time (Appleseed, 2007), fans and critics were thrilled, and the CD was rewarded with a Grammy nomination. For his follow-up album, Use Me, Bromberg chose a different approach: Why not ask some of his favorite singer-songwriters and musicians to write (or choose), produce, and perform on songs tailored to his versatile but distinctive skills as a guitarist and vocalist?

Answering David’s call were well-known artists from the many genres comprising the amorphous “Americana” musical category. Representing contemporary rootsy singer-songwriters: John Hiatt, the first musician Bromberg approached, who penned the pensive “Ride On Out a Ways” for him; for New Orleans “fonk,” Dr. John; there’s three-guitar jam band interplay with Widespread Panic and jug band music with Levon Helm (the sprightly “Bring It With You When You Come,” produced by Grammy-winning Larry Campbell). Linda Ronstadt puts in a rare appearance on a soulful Brook Benton ballad, Los Lobos contribute a Mexican-flavored waltz, Vince Gill and Tim O’Brien take care of the country and bluegrass quotient, Keb’ Mo’ brings the blues, and the hitmaking Butcher Brothers, producers Phil and Joe Nicolo (Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Cypress Hill, Nine Inch Nails), provide the languid R&B groove for the title song, a cover of Bill Withers’ classic “Use Me.”

The resultant album is due for July 12, 2011 release on Appleseed Records. A national tour will ensue.
Standout tracks change with each listening, but some of the high points include the crisp blues shuffle “Tongue,” the album’s lone Bromberg original, with Levon Helm on drums; “You Don’t Wanna Make Me Mad,” featuring David on slide guitar and Dr. John on piano; the ominous slow blues “Diggin’ in the Deep Blue Sea,” updated by Keb’ Mo’ and Gary Nicholson from Larry Davis’ “Texas Flood” to address the dangers of offshore drilling, and the chipper Vince Gill — Guy Clark co-write “Lookout Mountain Girl,” the only song on which David cedes most of the lead guitar duties (to Vince, although David splits the lead with Widespread Panic’s Jimmy Herring on “Old Neighborhood”).
Rather than collating individual instrumental parts literally phoned in to a central location, the recording sessions for Use Me generally took place on each guest artist’s home turf — in Woodstock (Levon Helm), New Orleans (Dr. John), Nashville (John Hiatt, Tim O’Brien, Vince Gill), Los Angeles (Los Lobos), and so on, to retain their regional flavors. For Bromberg, who started his professional career as an accompanist for everyone from Dion and Jay and the Americans to Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson, the sessions were simultaneously a throwback to his sideman days and a sidestep from his own recordings. “As artist and producer, I get to completely mold my vision of how the song should go,” he explains. “The drawback is that I don’t get many ideas that are not my own. It was fascinating for me to see the different approaches that everyone used in production.”
No matter who the producers, songwriters or accompanying musicians are on Use Me, Bromberg’s expressive guitar-playing and “rippling Fred Neil-like baritone that . . . brings warm, reassuring comfort” (Rolling Stone) remain the centerpiece of the CD, diamonds in golden settings.
Born in Philadelphia in 1945 and raised in Tarrytown, NY, “I listened to rock ’n’ roll and whatever else was on the radio,” says Bromberg. “I discovered Pete Seeger and The Weavers and, through them, Reverend Gary Davis. I then discovered Big Bill Broonzy, who led me to Muddy Waters and the Chicago blues. This was more or less the same time I discovered Flatt and Scruggs, which led to Bill Monroe and Doc Watson.”
Bromberg began studying guitar when he was 13 and eventually enrolled in Columbia University as a musicology major. The call of the Greenwich Village folk scene in the mid-’60s drew David to the downtown clubs and coffeehouses, where he could watch and learn from the best performers, including primary sources such as his inspiration and teacher, the Reverend Gary Davis.
Bromberg’s sensitive, blues-based approach to guitar-playing earned him jobs playing the Village “basket houses” for tips, the occasional paying gig, and lots of employment as a backing musician for Tom Paxton, Jerry Jeff Walker and Rosalie Sorrels, among others. He became a first-call, “hired gun” guitarist for recording sessions, playing on hundreds of records by artists including Bob Dylan (New Morning, Self Portrait, Dylan), Link Wray, The Eagles, Ringo Starr, Willie Nelson and Carly Simon. In the early ’90s, David produced an as-yet-unreleased Dylan album, although two tracks have been issued as part of Dylan’s “Bootleg Series.”
An unexpected and wildly successful solo spot at the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival in Great Britain led to a solo deal with Columbia Records, for whom David recorded four albums. His eponymous 1971 debut included the mock-anguished “Suffer To Sing the Blues,” a Bromberg original that became an FM radio staple, and “The Holdup,” a songwriting collaboration with former Beatle George Harrison on which Harrison also played slide guitar. David, who had met the Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia at the Woodstock Festival when they both took refuge from the rain in a tepee, wound up with four Dead members, including Garcia, playing on his next two albums.
Bromberg’s range of material, based in the folk and blues idioms, continually expanded with each new album to encompass bluegrass, ragtime, country and ethnic music, and his touring band grew apace. By the mid-’70s, the David Bromberg Big Band included horn-players, a fiddler, and several multi-instrumentalists, including David himself. Among the best-known Bromberg Band graduates: mandolinist Andy Statman, later a major figure in the Klezmer music movement in America, and fiddler Jay Ungar (who wrote the memorable “Ashokan Farewell” for Ken Burns’ PBS documentary, “The Civil War”).
Despite jubilant, loose-limbed concerts and a string of acclaimed albums on the Fantasy label, Bromberg found himself exhausted by the logistics of the music business. “I decided to change the direction of my life,” he explains. So David dissolved his band in 1980, and he and his artist/musician wife, Nancy Josephson, moved from Northern California to Chicago, where David attended the Kenneth Warren School of Violin Making. Though he still toured periodically, the recordings slowed to a trickle and then stopped.
After “too many Chicago winters,” in 2002 David and Nancy moved to Wilmington, Del., where they currently serve as unofficial “artists in residence” and where David established David Bromberg Fine Violins, a retail store and repair shop for high quality instruments. Frequent participation in the city’s weekly jam sessions helped rekindle Bromberg’s desire to perform music “live” again, and the encouragement of fellow musicians Chris Hillman (The Byrds, Desert Rose Band, Flying Burrito Brothers) and bluegrass wizard Herb Pedersen helped nudge him back into the recording studio. The Wilmington jams also led to the formation of Angel Band, fronted by Nancy and two other female vocalists, with David frequently serving as an accompanist.
Bromberg’s participation in his local and musical community has subsequently included a fund-raising music festival (Bromberg’s Big Noise in the Neighborhood) to help renovate a local theater, and a keynote address at this past spring’s Folk Alliance International convention, a non-profit organization of musicians, concert presenters and industry professionals.
David continues his musical revitalization with projects like Use Me, playing solo shows or backed by his own bluegrass quartet and reunions of the David Bromberg Big Band. Use your ears and catch him when you can!

Rolling Stone Heralds Virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro as Ukulele Hero

Ukulele phenomenon Jake Shimabukuro has received unanimous acclaim from New York Times, NPR, Time Magazine & NY Post. Next up is the current Rolling Stone “Best of Rock” issue that praises Shimabukuro as an “Ukulele Hero,” saying “one of the hottest axmen of the past few years doesn’t actually play guitar.” Writer Patrick Doyle called Shimabukuro’s cover of the Beatles’ “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” “jaw-dropping.”

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Check out the Rolling Stone article here.

Watch Shimabukuro’s rendition of “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” here.

More info on Jake Shimabukuro.