darkness

Deerhoof's New Collaborative 7” with Jeff Tweedy

Jeff Tweedy fronting Deerhoof? You might be surprised just how natural the voice of Wilco sounds amidst the eccentric, swirling chaos of the Deerhoofian musical universe.

The Wilco-Deerhoof connection goes back a long way. They toured the midwest together in 2004. Wilco guitarist Nels Cline's "Suspended Head" from Instrumentals (2002) was the guitarist's raucous tribute to Deerhoof. Frontman Jeff Tweedy has been name-checking Deerhoof records in best-of lists for years. And when Deerhoof recently pointed to Wilco as the inspiration for their song "Behold A Marvel In The Darkness,” the idea was hatched that Mr. Tweedy should actually have a go.

Which brings us to "Behold A Raccoon In The Darkness," the fourth installment of Deerhoof’s collaborative 7” series in which guest vocalists perform over an instrumental track from the band’s latest full-length, Deerhoof vs. Evil.

The instrumental track, the melody, and the lyrics for "Behold" are unchanged from the original. But in place of Deerhoof chanteuse Satomi Matsuzaki, we hear the immediately identifiable pipes of Jeff Tweedy, with harmonies by his son Spencer.

Side B features "Own It," an original song by The Raccoonists, a group comprised of Tweedy and his two sons, Spencer and Sam. Although the band originally began as an instrumental duo (consisting of Jeff and Spencer), it has since evolved into a trio with Sam providing vocals. Recorded in Spencer and Sam's bedroom, "Own It" is the first Raccoonists song to be released. However, the group does have plans to record more tracks later this year.

You can listen to the 7” and watch the video for “Own It” now.

"Behold a Raccoon in the Darkness" comes out October 11 on Polyvinyl Records. It is limited to 2000 copies on clear pink vinyl and it is available for pre-order now.

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TOUR DATES

aug 07 - Katowice, Poland - OFF Festival (Scena Lesna stage)

sep 15 - San Francisco, CA - Atrium at SFMOMA (Adam Pendleton & Deerhoof present BAND)

sep 20 - Brooklyn, NY - Music Hall of Williamsburg (White Suns, Mick Barr)

sep 21 - Philadelphia, PA - World Cafe Live (Joshua Stamper)

sep 22 - Charlottesville, VA - Jefferson Theater (Gull, Invisible Hand)

sep 23 - Cincinnati, OH - Know Theatre (Midpoint Music Festival)

sep 24 - Champaign, IL - Polyvinyl's 15th Anniversary Party at Pygmalion (Braid, Xiu Xiu, and many more)

sep 25 - Chicago, IL - Bottom Lounge (Trin Tran, The Cloak Ox)

sep 26 - St. Louis, MO - Luminary Center for the Arts (Sleepy Kitty)

sep 28 - Ithaca, NY - The Haunt (Keir Neurings, Powerdove)

sep 29 - Cambridge, MA - Middle East (The Toughcats, Fat Worm of Error)

oct 01 - Washington, DC - 9:30 Club (Benjy Ferree)

oct 02 - Asbury Park, NJ - ATP - Asbury Park Convention Hall & Paramount Theatre (w/ Portishead, Mogwai, Battles, Earth, and more)

Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey: Race Riot Suite

Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey will release their 21st album Race Riot Suite on August 30th. Conceived, written and arranged by the band's lap steel guitarist Chris Combs, the recording is a long form conceptual piece that tells the tragic story of the 1921 Tulsa race riot. JFJO's core line-up, which in addition to Combs includes Brian Haas (piano), Jeff Harshbarger (bass) and Josh Raymer (drums), is accompanied by a five-piece horn section featuring Steven Bernstein (trumpet), Peter Apfelbaum (tenor and baritone saxophone), Jeff Coffin (tenor saxophone), Mark Southerland (tenor saxophone) and Matt Leland (trombone). The album was produced by Costa Stasinopoulos and recorded at Tulsa's legendary Church Studio less than a mile from where the riot happened.
In 1921, Tulsa was home to a powerful and affluent African-American community. In one of the largest racial conflicts and cover-ups in American history, massive race riots resulted in the death of hundreds of black Tulsans and the destruction of the entire Greenwood city district, including "Black Wall Street." With jittery melodies, propulsive rhythms and swirling improvisations, JFJO reflects on one of the least understood atrocities of the Jim Crow-era. As the Race Riot Suite unfolds, however, the music ultimately offers light amid the darkness, celebrating the resiliency of community and offering a prayer for the terrible mistakes of the past to never again be repeated. Through the process, the album becomes part of a long lineage of jazz recordings to bring awareness to civil rights issues.
"We felt obligated as Oklahomans to shine a light. What played a big part in the creation of the suite was that it wasn't talked about in Tulsa or taught in schools. So it's kind of this weird looming thing around a really comfortable middle-class suburban community," explains Combs. "As a Tulsan, there was this weird darkness that was still looming. It wasn't talked about. It was deliberately covered up by the local government and press. The idea came from me as a jazz musician and a Tulsan having an emotional reaction to what I learned."
JFJO debuted Race Riot Suite in its entirety with a live performance at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center this past May. They will embark on a U.S. tour to support the album's release in the Fall. The band performs at Festival International De Jazz De Montreal on Friday evening.