experience

Lots of roots and jazz history at Jazz Middelheim 2010

This year the 29th edition of Jazz Middelheim takes place from August 12th through August 15th in Park Den Brandt in Antwerp, Belgium. There are names like Wayne Shorter Quartet, Hank Jones Trio, Ahmad Jamal, McCoy Tyner Trio feat. Joe Lovano, Dave Holland Flamenco Project and Toots Thielemans. The festival line up is nearly complete.

The festival opens on Thursday 12 August with Facing East, the Coltrane project of José James and Jef Neve. Pianists Hank Jones and McCoy Tyner both perform with their own trios and McCoy Tyner brings in Joe Lovano as his special guest.

On Friday 13 August the main act is none other than Wayne Shorter and his quartet. Ahmad Jamal and the Jeroen Van Herzeele Quartet take to the stage earlier in the evening.

Saturday 14 August has the godfather of the festival Toots Thielemans scheduled. A young band from the Antwerp Conservatory, Le Pragmatisme du Barman feat. Peter Evans, kicks off and other music earlier in the day features  Aka Moon + Baba Sissoko & Black Experience.

On Sunday 15 August, the final  day of the festival, the latest programme additions include Chucho Valdés with his Afro Cuban Messengers and Dave Holland & Pepe Habichuela Flamenco Quintet feat. Josemi Carmona. Chris Joris Experience opens this final day of the festival.

Acoustic STEAL YOUR FACE - This Thursday

Dynamic psychedelic jams, deep-funk grooves, tight emotional vocals, a little space and enough rocket fuel to get there and back - STEAL YOUR FACE is a high-energy band.  Born from the Spirit of Jerry Garcia, Steal Your Face blends thought provoking original music with the vast library of the Grateful Dead, Bob Dylan and other Classics.  Each SYF show is a unique experience, audiences are captivated as they and the band push each other to new heights and make music together. Five musicians with impressive chops who are constantly intertwining with each other and the audience,  Steal Your Face has a fresh sound that has the Woodstock generation reminiscing, the Bonnaroo kids screaming for more and everyone dancing.

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This Thursday, a unique evening of Acoustic Steal Your Face.  No cover charge. -- Thursday April 8, at The Temperance House, 5 S. State St. Newtown, PA.   215-860-9975  7:30pm-11pm.

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Upcoming Shows
Apr 8 2010 8:00P
Acoustic SYF at The Temperance House Newtown, Pennsylvania
Apr 20 2010 8:00P
ACOUSTIC SYF @ Chickies and Pete’s Northeast Philadelphia Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Apr 24 2010 9:00P
The Temperance House Newtown, Pennsylvania
Apr 30 2010 9:30P
The Hollywood Tavern Rockledge
May 1 2010 9:30P
with THINK PINK FLOYD at Street Road Bar and Grill Bensalem, Pennsylvania
May 14 2010 9:00P
The Temperance House Newtown, Pennsylvania
May 15 2010 3:00P
Timmy N Kimmy’s Barn Raising Fiesta Levittown, Pennsylvania
May 15 2010 7:00P
Watkins Glen ’Summer Jam’ 1973 Revival Ardmore, Pennsylvania
May 22 2010 2:00P
NAM JAM Dover, Delaware
May 28 2010 10:00P
Triumph Brewing Company NEW HOPE
Jun 10 2010 7:00P
ACOUSTIC SYF @ The Temperance House Newtown, Pennsylvania
Jun 12 2010 1:00P
In And Out Of The Garden We Go Music Festival Morrisville, Pennsylvania
Jun 19 2010 9:00P
The Temperance House Newtown, Pennsylvania
Jul 29 2010 7:00P
Acoustic SYF at The Temperance House Newtown
Aug 21 2010 8:30P
The Temperance House Newtown, Pennsylvania

1STBANK Center Grand Opening with Furthur March 5 and 6

1STBANK Center, Colorado’s new state-of-the-art entertainment facility will celebrate its Grand Opening on March 5 and 6 with a two-night stand by Furthur featuring Phil Lesh and Bob Weir.

The venue is managed by Colorado entertainment leaders AEG Live Rocky Mountains and Kroenke Sports Enterprises in a joint venture called Peak Entertainment.

Scalable for audience capacities from 3500 to 6500, the Center fills a niche as the state’s premier mid-sized venue, and will change the way patrons currently think about a venue of this size.

Says Peak Entertainment’s Chuck Morris (who is also President and CEO / AEG LIVE Rocky Mountains), “We’ve taken great efforts in designing the 1STBANK Center to combine the very best parts of arena production capabilities with the décor and soul of the world’s great theatres. This is a completely unique design approach for a venue of this size – fans and talent alike are going to want to come here.”



1STBANK Center will host a variety of world-class concerts, as well as family programming, sports events and more. Acts already booked for 2010 include Muse, Carrie Underwood, Daughtry, Sesame Street Live, Jason Aldean, The Denver Roller Dolls, Ultimate Fighting Championship, and more. Visit 1STBANKCenter.com for the most up-to-date calendar of events.

No matter the occasion for visiting, 1STBANK Center’s first priority is the patron experience. Morris explains, “1STBANK Center promises to offer all of what we love most about music and entertainment: quality, creativity, community and fun.”

Toward that effort, Peak Entertainment has made numerous improvements to the facility – improvements that promise to mark 1STBANK Center as the newest addition to an already impressive list of landmark Colorado music venues, such as Red Rocks Amphitheatre, The Paramount Theatre, and the Fox Theatre.

Gone are the white walls, bright lights, and soul-less signage of the typical modern arena. Patrons of the 1STBANK Center will enjoy rich colors, creative textures, and artful touches throughout the venue. At the center of the entertainment experience is a state-of-the-art video screen that hangs over the stage. Measuring 130 feet across, this versatile feature offers limitless ways to transform the venue’s main space.

Spaces throughout the concourse have also been transformed. The upper lounge, open to all guests, is now a premier viewing area with direct sight lines to the stage. Additionally, several previously enclosed bars have been remodeled to be inviting and welcoming gathering spots.

In 2011, 1STBANK Center is scheduled to become home to the highly anticipated Colorado Music Hall of Fame, a non-profit whose mission is to educate and to raise money for the Music School of the University of Colorado. Longtime Colorado rock critic G. Brown will curate the interactive multi-media museum. This permanent institution will honor artists who have created music in and about Colorado. Artists such as John Denver, Joe Walsh, Big Head Todd & The Monsters, Firefall, Dan Fogelberg, Poco, The Subdudes, The String Cheese Incident and The Fray are some acts to be honored. Plans are also in the works for historical locations such as Red Rocks Amphitheatre and Caribou Ranch to receive recognition. Celebrations of musical institutions such as Telluride Bluegrass Festival, Etown and KBCO Studio C - highlighting Colorado’s rich and vibrant musical story – will all receive space in the Hall.

Grand Opening weekend show details are as follows:

1STBANK Center Grand Opening
Furthur featuring Phil Lesh and Bob Weir
Friday, March 5 (8pm)
Limited number of tickets still available
Saturday, March 6 (8pm) SOLD OUT
(doors open at 6:30pm both nights)

11450 Broomfield Lane (Broomfield, CO)
Advanced Tickets $49.75 - $55.00 / All Ages Welcome

Chris Berry brings CB3 from Zimbabwe to the West Coast

What happens when you put African grooves born in the ghettos of Zimbabwe with the ground breaking guitar work of San Francisco’s scene and combine it with New York City’s urban electronica? The west coast is about to find out.

Joining together for their first multi-night tour, and performing under the guise of CB-3, Chris Berry has arranged his most interesting collaboration yet. Featuring San Francisco’s own Steve Kimock alongside the rhythm section of the Brazillian Girls comes an explosive cross-cultural musical experience for music lovers of all types - CB-3 (Chris Berry Trio) Featuring Steve Kimock. The 10-day tour will maneuver along the west coast including dates in Santa Cruz, San Francisco, Eugene and Portland Oregon.

Music first touched the Grammy award winning Chris Berry as a teen living in the heart of Zimbabwe where he carefully learned the indigenous rhythms of Africa on the sacred Mbira (African Thumb Piano). His ability to speak out against the tyranny of the Zimbabwean regime through the art of music won him overnight success across the country and in the World Music market, bringing his music around the globe. Since then, he has performed on the stages of the 2000 Olympics, the Sydney Opera house and the nations largest festivals across the United States with his project Panjea. 2010 finds the “Afropop Superstar” (SF Chronicle) a multi-instrumentalist with grace on Mbira, the hand drum, as well as a gifted singer-songwriter whose voice is often compared to Sting.

Together with CB3, Berry combines his unique intercultural perspective with the nations highest caliber of musicians, each known for their genre bending talent, for an intimate musical experience. The project features “Guitar Monk” Steve Kimock who was recently hailed on CNN.com as an “unknown legend,” as well as Aaron Johnston (drums) & Jesse Murphy (bass) from the Grammy award nominated Brazilian Girls.

Collectively, CB-3 (Chris Berry Trio) Featuring Steve Kimock has the ability to bring together three decades of music history tightly fitted into one anthology adorned with cutting-edge improvisational guitar, hip-hop and elements of modern electronica. Show goers can expect both a dance ready experience as well as an intimate view into music provoked by both the past and present.

For more information about CB3 or for ticket information check out: Chris Berry Trio | Panjea | Kimock

TOUR DATES
2/24 Moe's Alley - Santa Cruz, CA
2/25 Montbleu Resort Casino - Lake Tahoe, NV
2/26 Yoshi's - San Francisco, CA
2/27 Yoshi's - San Francisco, CA
2/28 Mystic Theater - Petaluma, CA
3/1 Point Arena Theater - Point Arena, CA
3/2 Red Fox Tavern - Eureka, CA
3/4 W.O.W. Hall - Eugene, OR
3/5 Mt. Tabor Theatre - Portland, OR
3/6 Domino Room - Bend, OR

EXPORT NOLA: Experience New Orleans Music in NYC!

New Orleans tunes in the Big Apple- for the Grateful Web
The Backbeat Foundation is proud to present "EXPORT NOLA: Experience New Orleans Music," the Official APAP Showcase of New Orleans music at the 2009 Association of Performing Arts Presenters Conference in New York. EXPORT NOLA showcases will be held on the evenings of January 9 and January 11, 2009 at Sullivan Hall in New York City.
The APAP Conference is the largest gathering of performing arts presenters, managers, and artists in the world. EXPORT NOLA will provide New Orleans artists the opportunity to perform before an audience of national and international talent buyers in town for the conference, sparking interest in New Orleans music and culture.

The line-up of EXPORT NOLA will offer some of the best musical talent from New Orleans and will include Paul Sanchez, John Boutte, Leroy Jones, DJ Soul Sister, The Jon Batiste Band, Christian Scott Quintet, Big Sam's Funky Nation, and Kirk Joseph's Backyard Groove feat. Big Chief Monk Boudreaux.
 
The Showcase on January 11 will be preceded by an EXPORT NOLA reception where attendees will be able to sample some of New Orleans soulful culinary delicacies while dancing to the party beats of DJ Soul Sister.
 
EXPORT NOLA events are open to the public and free to APAP Conference attendee badge holders. Tickets for the events are available at www.backbeattix.com.
 
EXPORT NOLA is made possible thanks to the generosity of the City of New Orleans, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation, WWOZ 90.7 fm, the New Orleans Musicians Clinic, Hubig's Pies and Loretta's Authentic Pralines.
 
Additional details and information about the events can be found at www.backbeatfoundation.org or by visiting the Foundation's Facebook and Myspace pages.

My Experience with Security at the DNC

DNC Security - photo by Mike Moran- for the Grateful Web

The Democratic National Convention came to Denver in August 2008 for the first time in one hundred years.

As a part-time reporter at KGNU last summer, I was assigned to cover the story of the Blackhawk helicopters that had been flying over downtown Denver for several days.  Special operations forces coordinated with local police and fire departments in organizing drills with Blackhawks.  Some drills were performed on the grounds of the old children's hospital.  Authorities said these drills were "routine" and had nothing to do with the Democratic National Convention, but that they were in preparation for the global war on "terrorism."  Helicopters flew low over tree tops and one Denver resident said they were so low that she could wave to the soldiers.  When residents in the vicinity of the children's hospital were questioned, they did not believe the public statement that authorities gave. 

There were reports in local newspapers of $50 million being allocated for the DNC.  A portion of the money went toward additional police officers from surrounding cities and Wyoming.  Part of the money also went to the purchase of additional equipment, including pepper spray guns.  

KGNU Associate News Director Maeve Conran, an Ireland native, said she did not recall this level of fear in Belfast.  Maeve expressed concern that the security forces covering the DNC might resort to their weapons prematurely. 

Weeks later I was offered the position to be a radio producer for Studio 08, which was the television and radio studio that was affiliated with the DNC.  The prospect of encountering the security first hand was a source of concern since I had read about the drills, the additional forces, and the millions spent on additional weaponry.  Additionally,   Maeve's comments about the possibility of weapons being drawn too soon instilled anxiety in me.

obamaDriving on Speer Boulevard towards downtown, I noticed the street getting narrower because of the barricades that were in place.  Turning into downtown Denver, I saw groups of police officers including SWAT team members walking down the sidewalk in full armor.  They looked prepared for action.

It was just after 4:00am.  I was dropped off about one mile north of the Pepsi Center, which was the site of the convention.  The barricades created a distant border around the Pepsi Center.  Police officers guarded the inside of the barricaded area.  I had my press credential around my neck. As I was wondering if I would be directed away and have to circumvent the barricade, to my surprise, an officer opened the barricade and let me in.  I had to show my credential to more officers before I crossed Speer Boulevard.  When I reached the security entrance to the Pepsi Center grounds, I had to show my credential again.  The security entrance was a tent that had detectors that resembled those of airport security.  My purse was searched and I was admitted.  Outside of the entrance to the Pepsi Center stood more people who checked my credential.  Then, in the lobby there were more people who checked my credential again.  Hence, though there were indeed several levels of security, at each point, officers were helpful and no one was hostile toward me.  

The Pepsi Center was packed with people.  Different credentials gave people clearance to different areas.  Mine permitted me to enter the hall surrounding the convention floor, but not the floor itself. 

Throughout the four days of the convention I did not witness any aggression on the part of security.  However, I read reports of tear gas and pepper spray being used on protestors, as well as of mass arrests and temporary jails and courts.  It was as though the Pepsi Center and the buffer zone created around it was a different atmosphere than that outside of the barricades.  The contrast between what I personally experienced and what I read about was stark and disturbing. 

invesoOn the last day of the DNC, Barack Obama gave his speech at Invesco Field.  There were more than 80 thousand people in the stadium.  After the speech, people emptied the stadium and there were no riots, there was no antagonism of any kind from the crowd or security.  In fact, people were in good spirits.  We all filed out in the dark, looking for the correct car or Light Rail stop.  I had never seen so many people on the streets of Denver, many of whom had come here from other cities; and yet there was an air of cooperation and unity, which brought tears to my eyes.

Several weeks later on Election Day I watched Barack Obama's victory speech on television, which was broadcast from Grant Park in Chicago, Illinois.  The crowd there dwarfed the one that had been at Invesco Field.  Estimates as to the number of people there ranged from 125 thousand to 500 thousand.  People were packed together like sardines standing shoulder to shoulder, waiting, attentively focused on the stage.  During his speech they showed support and when it was fished, they emptied Grant Park civilly just as had been done in Denver. 

My positive experiences and observations of the civilized behavior of thousands of people in these crowds led me to question the purpose of the additional riot police and extra weaponry in Denver during the DNC.  Was it all really necessary?

Grateful Dead Experience Comes Alive at UMass Amherst

- for the Grateful Web

Scholars, fans, artists, performers and members of the extended Grateful Dead family will gather at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in November for the first major university conference on the enduring legacy of the Dead experience.

Unbroken Chain: The Grateful Dead in Music, Culture and Memory, being held at November 16-18 at UMass Amherst, will bring together more than 50 presenters for 20 panel sessions ranging from music composition and improvisation to an examination of the band's business model – as well as a musical performances, gallery exhibits, and presentations. Unbroken Chain is being presented in conjunction with a semester-long graduate History seminar entitled American Beauty: Music, Culture and Society, 1945-95; and an undergraduate course entitled How Does the Song Go: The Grateful Dead as a Window into American Culture.

Among the Unbroken Chain panelists are "Mountain Girl" Carolyn Garcia, first wife of guitarist Jerry Garcia and a central figure among the Merry Pranksters who populated the early Grateful Dead scene; David Gans, host of the Grateful Dead Radio Hour for the past 20 years; Grateful Dead midi wizard Bob Bralove; and Dan Healy, who designed and built the "Wall of Sound," famed enabler of the Dead's improvisational style.

Plenary addresses will include a keynote by Dennis McNally, longtime Dead publicist and author of Long Strange Trip: The Inside History of the Grateful Dead.  McNally earned a doctorate in History at UMass Amherst in 1978.

"The academic world is not as removed from so-called reality as people think, especially those in the academic world," said McNally recently. "In the rock & roll world, there are pockets of meticulous intelligence and literacy, people like Jerry Garcia and (bassist) Phil Lesh."

The event also represents an unprecedented collaborative opportunity for scholars from more than a dozen disciplines in the humanities, social sciences, engineering and business, many of whom have come to identify their work as part of the emerging area of "Dead Studies."  This kind of collaboration emphasizes academic rigor and a traditional multi-disciplinary perspective, according to University of South Carolina oral historian Nicholas Meriwether, author of All Graceful Instruments: The Contexts of the Grateful Dead Phenomenon, recently published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

"Ultimately," says Meriwether, "the Dead phenomenon suggests a new way of looking at yourself, of what we are capable of in a modern Western Society that appears increasingly fragmented, media-drive, manipulated and alienating. . . In an era in which academics are increasingly aware of the need to collaborate across disciplinary lines, a topic with as broad-based an appeal as the Dead phenomenon should be fascinating – and welcome."

Among the other scholars taking part are Rebecca Adams, author of Deadhead Social Science: You Ain't Gonna Learn What You Don't Wanna Know; David Dodd, editor of The Complete Annotated Grateful Dead Lyrics;  UMass English professor Nicholas Bromell, author of Tomorrow Never Knows: Rock and Psychedelics in the 60s; and UMass Professor of Comparative Literature David Lenson, author of On Drugs.

Also making rare appearances are several seminal figures in the evolution of Dead scholarship, including ethnomusicologist Fred Lieberman and psychologist and chaos theorist Stanley Krippner.

John Mullin, Dean of the UMass Amherst Graduate School – which is sponsoring the event along with the Department of History and UMass Amherst Outreach – said that Unbroken Chain can be a model for future academic-community collaborations.

"Is it possible that we'll take a hit for focusing this kind of intellectual talent on what Jerry Garcia himself called 'just a dance band?'" said Mullin.  "Perhaps, but universities like ours need to be courageous in propelling serious scholarship in new directions, and in reaching out to communities far and wide. When we are timid in academia, we miss real opportunities. We hope that The Grateful Dead is the just the beginning."

Gallery sessions and discussions will feature the work of photographers Herb Greene, Susanna Millman and Lloyd Wolf, as well as poster and album cover artists Mikio Kennedy and Mike Dubois. In addition, original prints of Jerry Garcia's artwork will be displayed and available for purchase. Among the films being screened will be Deadheads: An American Subculture and a digitally re-mastered Sunshine Daydream, an until-now unreleased documentary on the August  27, 1972 benefit concert at Ken Kesey's farm in Oregon.

The weekend will include performances by the American Beauty Project ensemble, doing the music of acclaimed Dead albums Workingman's Dead and American Beauty, and Dark Star Orchestra, whose rhythm guitarist Rob Eaton and keyboardist Rob Baracco will take part in several of the panel discussions. The Dark Star performance at the UMass Amherst Fine Arts Center on Saturday evening will feature special guests and the work of Peak Experience Productions.

A maximum of 375 registrations for Unbroken Chain: The Grateful Dead in Music, Culture and Memory are now being accepted.

v  Information on registration and accommodations is available at www.umassconnections.com/unbrokenchain

v  Tickets, sold separately, for performances by the American Beauty Project and Dark Star Orchestra are available at http://umafacweb.admin.umass.edu/Online .

 

A full program, background and additional contacts are attached, and are available at http://www.umassconnections.com/unbrokenchain.

Enchanted Ape: An Enchanted Experience

Chris O''Brien- for the Grateful Web

This year's regional 10,000 Lakes Festival Cosmic Break Contest has unearthed several diamonds in the rough. Among those uncovered this year is the Wisconsin blues-tinged, gypsy-laced, rock band Enchanted Ape. Though they didn't win a place in the contest, they were asked to play the festival based on their talent. Enchanted Ape is always in the groove and produces a well-rounded set with unexpected touches. Originally, only one guitarist and three percussionists, the band has nearly doubled its members. It also welcomes guests on harmonica, bass, saxophone, and even electric cello and violin. No matter the configuration, Enchanted Ape produces a full sound that is precise and crisp with strong vocals. There's enough going on here for anybody. 

Enchanted Ape takes their name from Thomas Carlyle's (1843) written comment about non-conformists, where he states, "...and thou art as an Enchanted Ape under God's sky, where thou mightest have been a man, had proper schoolmasters and conquerors, and constables with cat o'nine tails, been vouchsafed thee...." Enchanted Ape welcomes being a non-conformist and feels it's an apt description of their non-genre-specific musical style.

apeWith roots in acoustic storytelling and blues, the band also has a generous sprinkling of renegade rock, gypsy whine, and just the most amazing layers of tribal percussion from doumbek to djembe to all manner of shakers and quiros.  Brad Danielson, Amanda Hawkinson, and Adam Kuchelmeister are responsible for the groove foundation that Chris O'Brien's guitar, Alec James Knutson's electric and slide guitar, and John Hurbis's bass. (Hurbis also plays percussion.)

What is most striking about Enchanted Ape beside its instrumentation is its strong lyrics and vocals. O'Brien and Knutson share the vocal honors, but it is Amanda Hawkinson's lovely vocal backup that sets Enchanted Ape far above just another jamband. That and Knutson's stirring guitar renderings that have a lyrical voice of their own.

A sampling of their songs shows just the tip of their talent. "False Flags," written by Chris O'Brien who crafts all of their songs, is a tale of the high seas and fits in with this summer's love of pirates. But the lyrics and vibe of this tune will haunt your memory long after hearing it. "Soulfood" has an island feel but has more meat than a happy trippy song. "Memphis Trouble Free" is a great bluesy Southern rock tune. But, "Fungi Lullaby" with its layers of organic meaning and exotic melody lines is destined to become a jam classic.

The band's debut album, Three Ring Symphony, was released last October.

Enchanted Ape will kick off the 10,000 Lakes Festival on Wednesday night at 6 pm at the Field Stage. Don't miss this band. It will be one jam fans will be talking about for a long time.