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PHAROAH SANDERS RETURNS to BROOKLYN

Two of Brooklyn’s vanguard organizations for African American music and culture, Central Brooklyn Jazz Consortium and International African Arts Festival, will collaborate to produce a Community Day Gala Concert, as part of the 11th Annual Central Brooklyn Jazz Festival, featuring saxophone great Pharoah Sanders. This event will take place on Saturday, March 27th at Boys and Girls High School auditorium located at 1700 Fulton Street in the Bedford Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn.  Tickets are $35 in advance, available online or by calling 718.773.2252 or 718.638.6700.  Doors open at 7:30 PM concert begins at 8:00 PM.

Grammy award winner Pharoah Sanders has not performed in Brooklyn since his days at the legendary jazz shrine The East. Pharoah’s ascent to stardom began with collaborations with John Coltrane.  His distinctive sound has revered him among many jazz lovers.  Other jazz luminaries he has performed or recorded with include: McCoy Tyner, Elvin Jones, Sun Ra, Don Cherry, Billy Higgins and Alice Coltrane just to name some.  This concert also includes performances by Omi Yesa (Afro-Cuban and Yoruba folklore music) and poet Louis Reyes Rivera.

International African Arts Festival is a not for profit entity that began in 1971 as a fundraiser for the Uhuru Sasa School. Their cultural presentation was originally known as the African Street Carnival, fore runner to BAM’s Dance Africa Festival.  Now in its 40th year the annual IAAF attracts nearly 75,000 people and presents musicians from across the African Diaspora.  International artist such as Fela Kuti, The Mighty Sparrow, Lauren Hill and Abbey Lincoln, just to name a few, as well as local artists present(ed) their musical styling's.

11th Annual Central Brooklyn Jazz Festival, March 27th thru April 30, 2010, will feature a lineup of international, local musicians; jazz forums; youth performances and a Brooklyn Jazz Hall of Fame & Museums (TM) induction ceremony.  Confirmed venues include: Brooklyn Tech Auditorium, Weeksville Historical Society, BAMcafe Live, Parlor Jazz, Dweck Center for Contemporary Culture-Brooklyn Public Library Central Branch, Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Plaza, Afroarts Design, Sistas’ Place, Hitchcock Institute for Studies in American Music at Brooklyn College, Two Steps Down, Brooklyn Borough Hall, Brooklyn Arts Council, Rustik Lounge, Brooklyn Historical Society, New York Aquarium, Sugar Hill Restaurant and non traditional music venues throughout the borough.

Central Brooklyn Jazz Consortium acknowledges Brooklyn Tourism and Visitors Center, Long Life Information & Referral Network, Brooklyn Arts Council, Department of Cultural Affairs and International African Arts Festival, Inc. for assistance with producing the 11th Annual Central Brooklyn Jazz Festival, the longest continuous running jazz festival in the borough.

Central Brooklyn Jazz Consortium/CBJC founded in 1999, is an amalgam of patrons, entertainment venues, faith based and community organizations and musicians.  Over the past ten (10) years CBJC has presented an annual spring festival, established a Brooklyn Jazz Hall of Fame & Museum (TM), and produced yearly programs that feature local jazz talent.  CBJC is a nonprofit corporation committed to preserving, promoting and supporting live music within the under served communities of Brooklyn.

Local Natives Announce US Tour

Local Natives make soaring, sky-scraping harmonies, dreamy orchestral melodies, and throbbing tribal beats that bash their way into your soul. Theirs are songs you can dance to almost as well as you can swoon to them. Drawing a line from the vocal stylings of Crosby Stills Nash & Young and the Zombies through the more esoteric edges of post-punk and Afro-beat, this California five piece have communally crafted a brand of indie rock all their own.

For Local Natives everything is a collaboration, from song writing duties to the band’s self produced artwork. The three part harmonies come courtesy of keyboardist Kelcey Ayer, guitarists Ryan Hahn and Taylor Rice. Then there’s Matt Frazier on drums and Andy Hamm on bass, who look after the band’s equally impressive graphics and artwork.

One of SXSW 2009’s biggest success stories, the band drove for two days to get from Los Angeles to Austin in order to play nine spectacular shows that saw them sprinting, instruments in hand, from one gig to the next. Their hectic schedule paid off as Local Natives left Austin with the attention of the UK music Industry.

Based in the Silver Lake area of Los Angeles, three of the five-piece originally hail from Orange County. Kelcey, Ryan and Taylor attended neighboring high schools and hooked up with bassist Andy a year after they graduated, later meeting drummer Matt.  They’ve been playing – and evolving - together for three years. Last year, however, the band realized that the new songs they were writing were the sounds of a new project entirely.

It was in December 2008 that the band decamped to Silver Lake, where they all live in the same house.  But the Silver Lake digs isn’t the first house the band have shared. They lived together in Orange County too, in a place affectionately known as Gorilla Manor. “It was insanely messy and there were always friends over knocking around on guitars or our thrift store piano,” says Ryan, “it was an incredible experience and I’ll never forget that time.” The original Gorilla Manor, where the band wrote the majority of their record, had such an impact that the band has paid tribute to the house by naming their debut album in its honor.

The self-funded Gorilla Manor was recorded by Raymond Richards in West Los Angeles. Richards produced the record with Local Natives in his own Red  Rockets Glare Studio.

Featuring twelve sumptuous slices of dappled California sunlight and beguiling percussive rhythms, the album kicks off with the moody, driving, ‘Wide Eyes’. Says Ryan, “It’s about people’s obsession with the miraculous and disastrous…with witnessing extraordinary events”. The effervescent, mandolin boasting ‘Airplanes’ follows, which Kelcey explains is about “longing to have met my grandfather, a great man and pilot, who died before I was born.”  Also included is the glorious ‘Sun Hands’, which was released as a limited edition single on Chess Club back in July.  According to Taylor, the lyrics describe “that all too familiar feeling of wanting what you can’t have –  especially when you once had it.”  There’s a cover version in the mix too, a barely recognizable version of Talking Heads’ ‘Warning Sign’. “We’ve basically flipped the song on its head,” says Matt, explaining how they switched David Byrne’s original yelped vocals into a beautiful three-part harmony.

Local Natives US Tour

4/20 Tucson, AZ – Solar Culture
4/22 Dallas, TX – The Cavern
4/23 Austin, TX – Emo’s Inside
4/24 Houston, TX – Mango’s
4/26 Little Rock, AR – Sticky Fingerz Chicken Shack
4/27 Haittesburg, MS – Thirsty Hippo
4/29 St. Augustine, FL – Cafe 11
4/30 Nashville, TN – The Basement
5/1 Atlanta, GA – Masquerade
5/4 Chapel Hill, NC – Local 506
5/5 Washington, DC – DC 9
5/6 New York, NY – Bowery Ballroom
5/7 Philadelphia, PA – Kung Fu Necktie
5/8 Allston, MA – Great Scott
5/11 Cleveland, OH – Beachland Ballroom
5/12 Columbus, OH – The Basement
5/14 Chicago, IL – Schubas
5/15 Rock Island, IL - Rock Island Brewing Company
5/17 Minneapolis, MN – 400 Bar
5/18 Iowa City, IA – The Mill
5/19 Columbia, MO – Mojo’s
5/21 Denver, CO – Larimer Lounge
5/22 Salt Lake City, UT – Kilby Court
5/25 Spokane, WI – Empyrean
5/26 Boise, ID – Neurolux
5/27 Portland, OR – Mississippi Studios
5/28 Vancouver, BC – Media Club
5/30 Seattle, WA – Sasquatch

Local Natives | Debut LP "Gorilla Manor" Out 2/16/10

Local Natives make soaring, sky-scraping harmonies, dreamy orchestral melodies, and throbbing tribal beats that bash their way into your soul.  Theirs are songs you can dance to almost as well as you can swoon to them. Drawing a line from the vocal stylings of Crosby Stills Nash & Young and the Zombies through the more esoteric edges of post-punk and Afro-beat, this California five piece have communally crafted a brand of indie rock all their own.
For Local Natives everything is a collaboration, from song writing duties to the band’s self produced artwork. The three part harmonies come courtesy of keyboardist Kelcey Ayer, guitarists Ryan Hahn and Taylor Rice. Then there’s Matt Frazier on drums and Andy Hamm on bass, who look after the band’s equally impressive graphics and artwork.
One of SXSW 2009’s biggest success stories, the band drove for two days to get from Los Angeles to Austin in order to play nine spectacular shows that saw them sprinting, instruments in hand, from one gig to the next. Their hectic schedule paid off as Local Natives left Austin with the attention of the UK music Industry.
Based in the Silver Lake area of Los Angeles, three of the five-piece originally hail from Orange County. Kelcey, Ryan and Taylor attended neighboring high schools and hooked up with bassist Andy a year after they graduated, later meeting drummer Matt.  They’ve been playing – and evolving - together for three years. Last year, however, the band realized that the new songs they were writing were the sounds of a new project entirely.
It was in December 2008 that the band decamped to Silver Lake, where they all live in the same house.  But the Silver Lake digs isn’t the first house the band have shared. They lived together in Orange County too, in a place affectionately known as Gorilla Manor. “It was insanely messy and there were always friends over knocking around on guitars or our thrift store piano,” says Ryan, “it was an incredible experience and I’ll never forget that time.” The original Gorilla Manor, where the band wrote the majority of their record, had such an impact that the band has paid tribute to the house by naming their debut album in its honor.
The self-funded Gorilla Manor was recorded by Raymond Richards in West Los Angeles. Richards produced the record with Local Natives in his own Red  Rockets Glare Studio.
Featuring twelve sumptuous slices of dappled California sunlight and beguiling percussive rhythms, the album kicks off with the moody, driving, ‘Wide Eyes’. Says Ryan, “It’s about people’s obsession with the miraculous and disastrous…with witnessing extraordinary events”.  The effervescent, mandolin boasting ‘Airplanes’ follows, which Kelcey explains is about “longing to have met my grandfather, a great man and pilot, who died before I was born.”  Also included is the glorious ‘Sun Hands’, which was released as a limited edition single on Chess Club back in July.  According to Taylor, the lyrics describe “that all too familiar feeling of wanting what you can’t have – especially when you once had it.”  There’s a cover version in the mix too, a barely recognizable version of Talking Heads’ ‘Warning Sign’. “We’ve basically flipped the song on its head,” says Matt, explaining how they switched David Byrne’s original yelped vocals into a beautiful three-part harmony.

Local Flare | You Have To See It To Believe It: Gregory Alan Isakov & the Freight, Bela Karoli, Paper Bird & The Wheel

Thursday night was an exhibition of local talent at the Boulder Theater, and Yours Truly does what he can to get the word out about local talent.  Four Denver area bands heated up the stage, each bringing a unique and innovative flavor that I find to be too often lacking in the Big Name touring company bands.  True to the Indie Rock tradition, you'll probably never hear any of these guys or girls on mainstream radio, but their ever-growing fanbases reminds us that media att

Local Music Review: Torrid Flesh

I lucked out on this one. I showed up at Pinky's this past Wednesday to hang out with my new friends Iconocaust. Shred had given me a call and said that their new CD was finished and he had a signed copy for me to pick up at their show. Definitely pick up "The Natural Evolution of Metal" from there website! Awesome stuff!

Local Music Review: Iconocaust

For years Denver has been overlooked as a source for new music. Everyone knows about L.A, Seattle and New York but I guess the main stream media in this country figures Denver is backwater country town and if someone happens to come out of this area playing metal, rock, or rap it was just a fluke. Well some of the best metal I have heard in the last several years has all been in some of the local bars and warehouses in the Denver/Boulder area. RCA and Sony need to set up shop here in Denver if they want to get in on the new music revolution, L.A.