10/14/2005

Dark Star Orchestra Live Webcast 10/14/2005 - Archive Available

Live Stream of DSO from McDonald Theater Friday, 10/14- for the Grateful Web

Dark Star Orchestra and The Grateful Web teamed up to provide an streaming video broadcast of DSO's October 14 performance at the McDonald Theatre in Eugene, OR.

You can click on this link to play the stream:

DSO - 10/14/2005 - Live Webcast Archive from Grateful Web

There are a few places during the show that are glitchy on the master file.  Especially during the start of the second set.  The sound board levels were raised up considerably so there is some audio spiking during the first part of Playing.  The rest is due to my computer processing video and audio and then sending it out.  Not to mention that I was exchanging feed back with people via email, this article, and instant messaging.  The lesson learned for next webcast... TWO COMPUTERS!  All things considered, I think the video turned out pretty good and some of the camera work is quite handy.  It is a bit dark at times, but that is directly related to the lighting in the room.  I don't think it would have been a good idea to have big spot lights on top of the video cameras.  :)

Grateful Web's favorite comment quote from the DSO webcast...   "Its Saturday morning in S.E. Asia... and I am dancing in my apartment... thanks again!"

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