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Tue, 11/11/2008 - 7:33 pm

Mel Martin—composer, arranger, bandleader, saxophonist, flutist—is one of the most versatile and inventive musicians ever to emerge from the San Francisco Bay Area. In his long career, he's played a part in many of the innovative movements that have emerged from that creative community. He worked and recorded with a number of the progressive rock and Latin bands of the late '60s and early '70s, including the Loading Zone, Cold Blood, Azteca, and Boz Scaggs. In 1977 he founded the award-winning Listen, one of the first West Coast jazz-fusion bands. And he's currently artistic director of Bebop and Beyond, a group he formed in 1983, as well as leading The MEL MARTIN BAND and Big Band, the Tenor Conclave, and the Benny Carter All-Star Tribute Band.

 

Martin's latest CD, Just Friends by the Mel Martin/Benny Carter Quintet, was recorded live at Yoshi's Jazz Club in Oakland in April 1994 with Carter on alto saxophone, Martin on tenor saxophone and flute, Roger Kellaway on piano, bassist Jeff Chambers, and drummer Harold Jones. Its summer 2007 release coincides with Carter's centennial (August 8). Martin calls the disc "one of the best-sounding live recordings I've ever heard."

 

The musicianship on Just Friends is superb. Kellaway and Jones had played frequently with Carter, and Chambers and Martin have a long working relationship of their own, giving the ensemble an uncanny level of communication. As for Carter, "Benny's playing was fluid and exploratory," Martin says. "You never knew where he was going to go."

 

The set includes "Perdido," a tune associated with Duke Ellington; "People Time," a Carter composition with Mel on flute ("the best flute performance I've ever recorded," he says); "Elegy in Blue," composed by Carter upon the death of a close longtime friend; Martin's 3/4 original "Spritely," a feature for Mel and the trio; and the standards "Secret Love" and "Just Friends."

 

"The arrangements [on the new CD] were spontaneous," Martin says. "We would listen to each other, then make contributions to the ongoing conversation. That's how we'll play in the Benny Carter Tribute Band I'm putting together now with Roger [Kellaway], Andrew [Speight, alto saxophone], Robb [Fisher, bass], and Jeff [Marrs, drums]."

 

Mel Martin met Benny Carter at a Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame gathering in 1978. "I was in the pit orchestra," Martin recalls. "Benny spoke about his work scoring films and showed clips from Stormy Weather and other movies he worked on. At the end of the gig he said hello to every member of the band and shook everybody's hand, a typically gracious gesture.

 

"In 1986 I went to the Verona Jazz Festival with Bebop and Beyond. Benny and I got to hang out, and he stayed in touch." In 1989 Carter asked Martin to put together a big band for a weeklong gig at Kimball's East. "It was a five-sax, eight-brass and rhythm section group; we played Benny's compositions." After a second weeklong run at Kimball's in 1990, Carter asked Martin to join his big band for two tours of Japan.

 

"Except for a few tunes like 'Only Trust Your Heart,' 'Key Largo,' and 'Cow Cow Boogie,' Benny's music isn't that well known," Martin observes, "but it's up there with Ellington. He's one of the most underappreciated composers of the 20th century. When I got to know his compositions on that tour, I was astounded."

 

The arrangements Carter created for his music inspired Martin to apply for an NEA grant to record Carter's compositions. Mel Martin Plays Benny Carter (Enja, 1994) combined music recorded live at Yoshi's in 1994 with a studio session featuring pianist Kenny Barron, drummer Victor Lewis, and bassist Rufus Reid. Just Friends lets us hear more of what Carter and Martin played on those magical nights.

 

Mel Martin was born in Sacramento on June 7, 1942. Both parents were singers, and early piano and clarinet lessons led him to Benny Goodman and to Glen Church's Jazz Rhythm & Blues radio program. The big bands passing through town—Woody Herman, Duke Ellington, Count Basie—kept his interest high. "Seeing Benny Goodman made me want to play jazz," Mel recalls. "His sax man Budd Johnson had an incredible sound; he didn't need a mike to fill the hall. I had a small combo—clarinet, accordion, and drums. After gigs we played at Mel's drive-in for tips."

 

While still a teenager, Martin was fortunate enough to sit in with Wes Montgomery and his brothers. "Monk and Buddy Montgomery moved to Sacramento after the Mastersounds [their successful quartet with Richie Crabtree and Benny Barth] disbanded. They brought Wes out from back East, and drove around to gigs in a pink Caddy.

 

"I'd go listen when they played the Swinging Lantern or the Iron Sandal. I showed up one night with my flute, got up my nerve and asked if I could sit in. They were very encouraging. After the gig, Wes wrote out the changes to 'West Coast Blues' on a napkin I still have."

 

While majoring in music at San Francisco State in 1962, Martin met John Handy, a fellow undergraduate, and played in his Freedom Band. "[John] had played with Mingus and had his own records on Roulette. He was a big influence on me. We played demonstrations and colleges. There wasn't a lot of money involved, but we played stuff by Mingus and Handy."

 

Martin learned how to play bop with the musicians who hung out at Bop City, Soulville, the Jazz Workshop, Shelton's Blue Mirror, Jack's on Sutter, and later the Both/And. "The greats would go there after their gigs to hang with the local musicians, eat chicken and waffles, and play jazz," he recalls. "Clubs had jams from 2 to 6 a.m. and from 6 to 11 a.m. You could catch a gig on Friday, then go to a club and play all night, get some sleep and do it all over again on Saturday. Bop City and Soulville were my schools."

 

Starting in the late 1960s, Martin began a period of playing with progressive rock and Latin bands, among them the Loading Zone, Cold Blood, Azteca, and Boz Scaggs. In 1977 Martin formed Listen, an important part of the early West Coast jazz-fusion scene. "The Fourth Way, Jerry Hahn Brotherhood, and the John Handy Quintet were all based here," Martin points out. "Chick Corea was putting Return to Forever together, and Herbie Hancock started the Headhunters in San Francisco, so there's a rich lineage of fusion in the Bay Area."

 

Listen made three albums—two for the Inner City label, Listen Featuring Mel Martin (1977) and Growing (1978); and She Who Listens (1979) for the small Scottish label Move. Martin received a Musician of the Year award from the San Francisco chapter of NARAS (Grammy) in 1977 as well as a Bammy for Best Jazz Album of 1977 for Listen Featuring Mel Martin. Illustrious Listen alumni include steel pan player Andy Narell and drummer Terry Bozzio.

 

Martin has been artistic director of the group Bebop and Beyond since 1983. Eddie Marshall, John Handy, George Cables, Ed Kelly, and Warren Gale have passed through its ranks. The band's discography includes Bebop and Beyond (Concord, 1984); Bebop and Beyond Plays Thelonious Monk (Blue Moon, 1990); Bebop and Beyond Plays Dizzy Gillespie (Blue Moon, 1991), with special guest Dizzy Gillespie; and Friends and Mentors: Bebop and Beyond Plays the Music of Mel Martin (Quixotic, 2000).

 

Mel Martin has received five National Endowment for the Arts grants—a Compositional Grant in 1976, and subsequent funding to preserve the music of Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, and Benny Carter for the recordings Bebop and Beyond Plays Thelonious Monk, Bebop and Beyond Plays Dizzy Gillespie, Mel Martin Plays Benny Carter,and the brand-new Just Friends. He has been honored by the San Francisco Jewish Museum as part of their Jewish Presence in Jazz Series. Other projects include the Tenor Conclave, currently on hiatus, a sextet with Tim Armacost, Rob Roth, Mark Levine, Robb Fisher, and Akira Tana, focusing on the repertoire of great saxophonists of the past, particularly Joe Henderson; and the Mel Martin All-Star Big Band, which plays new arrangements of standards as well as the music of Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Benny Carter, Jimmy Heath, and Mel Martin.

 

As performer, composer-arranger, and multi-instrumentalist (soprano, alto, and tenor saxophones; flute and alto flute; clarinet and bass clarinet), Martin has contributed to the CBS television series The Twilight Zone and the films Rumblefish, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Warriors, and Street Music. Martin has assembled (and performed in) big bands for McCoy Tyner and Dizzy Gillespie, and played with the Freddie Hubbard Quintet and Charlie Haden's Liberation Orchestra.

 

Martin, who taught at the Stanford Jazz Workshop at Stanford University from 1984 to 1995, is a highly respected national clinician. He has produced the Bebop and Beyond Advanced Jazz Workshops for the Marin Jewish Community Center, and conducts workshops at his studio in Novato and in the Marin County public schools. "I feed my students classics from the jazz repertoire and discover some of the young talents that will take the music into the future.

 

"I've always loved music," Martin adds, "from jazz to rock to classical, and I've been blessed to be able to make a living at it." After six decades of playing, Mel Martin is still exploring the limitless possibilities of musical expression with the same enthusiasm he felt when he first picked up a clarinet as a boy.

THE MEL MARTIN QUARTET @ The Kitano 

66 Park Avenue, NY, NY 10016 (212)885-7000 ( 800)548-2666
Shows at 8 & 10PM $25 cover, $15 minimum.
with
Mel Martin - saxophones & flute
Taylor Eigsti - piano
Steve Laspina  - bass
Steve Johns  - drums

Mon, 11/24/2008 - 9:49 am

Jazz pianist Kenny Drew Jr. returns to New York for a rare solo performance on December 17, 2008 as part of the Lyric Chamber Music Society of New York concert series at the Kosciuszko Foundation. He continues the Lyric's tradition of infusing Jazz into traditional Chamber Music programming, combining his virtuosic talents, evident in his performances of Classical works, with superb improvisational instincts, as showcased in his Jazz performances, be they solo or in collaboration with such luminaries as David Taylor, Daniel Schnyder and many others.

In just ten seasons since its debut in the spring of 1998, the Lyric Chamber Music Society is recognized by musicians, the press, and audiences as one of the preeminent chamber music organizations in the country. Founded to present the works of the giants of the past and present, the Lyric performs masterpieces of chamber music literature and unusual repertoire in the intimate salon of an elegant Fifth Avenue mansion and at Victor Borge Hall — offering the music in the personal and intimate ambience in which it was intended to be heard. "Adventurous," The New York Times has called the Lyric, for its repertoire spanning from the Renaissance to the present, a combination of classic canonical chamber works, rarely performed compositions, and contemporary pieces. Beethoven's Kreutzer Sonata may be followed by a sonata by Poulenc, Gershwin by Jobim, Bizet by bossa nova, or J.S. Bach transcribed for four marimbas by a world premiere composed for Lyric artists.

The Lyric has attracted to its roster some of the world's most distinguished musicians, accomplished orchestral players, and up-and-coming young talent. More than a dozen concert masters and first chair players of the New York Philharmonic and Metropolitan Opera Orchestra as well as extraordinary jazz musicians have chosen the Lyric as their musical second home. Young artists who are recognized in music circles as the next generation of performing greats—many handpicked by the Lyric's legendary Advisory Board—regularly get an opportunity to introduce themselves to a wider audience. Such has been the creative energy and sense of possibility flowing from our concerts that in the brief period since our inception one new trio has already been formed under our auspices and two have made their New York debuts.

Reaching out to an ever-widening audience, Lyric virtuosos bring the inspiring scope of music's possibilities to thousands of New York public school students and reach millions of listeners on National Public Radio. As New Yorkers and visitors look to the Metropolitan Opera for opera and the New York Philharmonic for symphony, more and more people are turning to the Lyric Chamber Music Society of New York for chamber music and "chamzz," a Lyric innovation: programs combining classical music and jazz.

Kenny Drew Jr. was born in New York City in 1958. He started music lessons at the age of four. After studying classical piano with his Aunt Marjorie, he branched out into the area of jazz music. Kenny Jr. has performed worldwide with a comprehensive variety of musicians, including Stanley Jordan, Out of the Blue (OTB), Stanley Turrentine, Slide Hampton and the Jazz Masters, the Mingus Big Band, Steve Grossman, Yoshiaki Masuo, Sadao Watanabe, Smokey Robinson, Frank Morgan, Daniel Schnyder, and many others.

Kenny Drew Jr. was the winner of the 1990 Great American Jazz Piano Competition in Jacksonville, Florida. He has appeared as a leader at many major festivals, including the Jacksonville Jazz Festival, Kyoto Jazz Festival, Savannah on Stage Festival, Clearwater Jazz Festival, and the Newark Jazz Festival. Kenny has also performed as a leader at many major jazz clubs around the country, such as Bradley's (NY), Visiones (NY), The Blue Note (NY), Blues Alley (DC), Fat Tuesday's (NY), The Village Gate (NY), Trumpets (NJ), The Jazz Showcase (Chicago), Twins Lounge (DC), One Step Down (DC), and the Montreal Bistro (Toronto). He has recorded nine albums as a leader and has also made numerous recordings as a sideman. Kenny has performed at concerts and in clubs with The Carnegie Hall Jazz Band, the Faddis/Hampton/Heath Sextet, Steve Turre, Jack Walrath, David Sanchez, Jack Wilkins, Michael Mossman, Ronnie Cuber, Steve Slagle, and Marlena Shaw. Other performances included appearances with Jon Faddis, Slide Hampton, and Jimmy Heath at the Montreal North Sea, and Lugano festivals and with the Mingus Big Band at the Chicago and Detroit festivals.

In addition to his exploits in Jazz, Kenny has built a reputation as a performer of classical music. He has performed both jazz and classical music at the Barossa Music Festival in Australia. The classical repertoire included Bach concertos and music by African-American composers. These concerts consisted of solo piano recitals and appearances with renowned classical musicians such as violinist Jane Peters and pianist Peter Waters. Kenny participated in a performance of Charles Mingus' large-scale composition Epitaph at the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam under the direction of Gunther Schuller. He performed a Mozart concerto with the Milwaukee Symphony conducted by Andreas Delfs, and appeared at the International Bach Festival in Leipzig, playing Bach's music with Daniel Schnyder and David Taylor. Further appearances as a classical performer include the Luzern Piano Festival and in Key West.

In addition to his work as a soloist and jazz side man, Kenny has been playing with a classical/chamber-jazz trio led by composer/saxophonist/flautist Daniel Schnyder, with David Taylor on bass trombone. The group has performed concerts in Switzerland and New York as well as the Barossa Festival in 1997. Among Kenny's recordings with Daniel Schnyder are the Sonata for Soprano Saxophone And Piano and the Sonata for Bass Trombone And Piano (with David Taylor). Kenny also participated in the recording of Schnyder's Third Symphony with the Basel Radio Orchestra under the direction of Hans Drewanz. Other groups and artists Kenny has performed with are the Absolute Ensemble, the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, Shirley Horn, Teddy Edwards and Henry Johnson. Kenny also played a solo piano tribute to Duke Ellington on Ellington's 100th birthday at the Tonhalle in Zurich. He has recently appeared with his own trio at the Village Vanguard in New York, the Jazz Showcase in Chicago and on the Queen Elizabeth II Jazz Cruise.

Kenny has recorded over twenty albums as a leader, amongst them, in 2001, Autumn for the Japanese label Pony Canyon. The CD features George Mraz on bass and Tony Jefferson on drums. Drew recorded a CD of two-piano jazz arrangements of music by Ravel with pianist Peter Waters. This CD, which was recorded in Switzerland, also features the Winterthur Chamber Orchestra. Kenny Drew Jr. taught at the Engadin International Summer Piano Academy in Switzerland, giving master classes and private lessons. He was one of the featured artists at the West Coast Jazz Party in California. He has toured Switzerland with Daniel Schnyder, including a concert with members of the Zurich Opera Orchestra. Kenny played two concerts at the Umea Jazz Festival in Sweden, including a performance of Daniel Schnyder's Piano Concerto with the Norrlands Opera Orchestra under the direction of Kristjan Järvi. This concert was recorded for release as a CD.

Fri, 11/28/2008 - 10:45 pm

Coming off of its very successful November 25th 2008 Gala Fundraiser which raised over $200,000, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem spends December explores the variegated personalities and styles of jazz music through discussions with trombonist and experimental composer George Lewis, drummer Andrew Cyrille and pianist Larry Willis. 
 
Two special events leaven our free public programming this month. How Paris influenced the development of jazz is the topic of the first, whereas "Jews and Jazz" will delve into the intersection of Harlem, ethnicity, race, culture, business and the way jazz has served as a magnet for members of the Jewish community. A live performance promises to demonstrate musically the insights related in the discussion between musicians Yale Strom and Loren Schoenberg.
 
As a museum dedicated to codifying the grand legacy of the living art form of jazz, we believe it necessary to highlight the contributions of unsung contributors to the idiom. Our classes will delve into the musical legacies of three pianists curious listeners will be pleased to discover more about: Herbie Nichols, Andrew Hill, and the French virtuoso Martial Solal. 
 
The National Jazz Museum staff, board, and volunteers invite you to attend these free sessions, and to share the wealth and glory of this music to those closest to you in this holiday season.

Tuesday, December 2, 2008
Jazz for Curious Listeners

Deserving Wider Recognition: Herbie Nichols 
7:00 – 8:30pm
Instructor: Frank Kimbrough

Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300 or register online

Herbie Nichols is a perennially neglected jazz pianist and composer. He recorded less than half of his 170 compositions on three classic trio albums for Blue Note and one for Bethlehem before dying of leukemia at the age of 43 in 1963. He is often compared to Thelonious Monk, and his piano playing and compositions certainly do have some of the harmonic angularity people associate with Monk. But he had a very distinctive sound of his own, more melancholy and, for lack of a better word, poetic than Monk in many ways. In fact, Nichols was something of a poet, as the titles to his tunes suggest. And he was fully Monk's equal in the quality and individuality of his tunes. He is held in high critical esteem within jazz, although his tunes are still not widely recorded. Outside of jazz circles, the only tune of his anyone is likely to know is "The Lady Sings the Blues," which Billie Holiday set lyrics to and adopted for the title of her autobiography.

Nichols was born in New York in 1919 and died there forty-four years later. In the course of his brief life he was for a time an associate of Monk's, though to consequently call his music Monk-like is to do it a grave disservice. He played with, amongst others, Milt Larkin and Rex Stewart out of economic necessity. His own harmonically extraordinary music was no small distance removed from theirs. This is not to imply however that his music amounted merely to an academic exercise. As it was to be with Andrew Hill some years later, Blue Note records afforded Nichols an unprecedented opportunity to record his own music, and he made full use of it, as the three CD set of "The Complete Blue Note Recordings" shows. The music found here comes exclusively from his pen and it was recorded in a bout of concentrated recording activity between May 6, 1955, and April 19, 1956. It was all performed in the trio setting, and throughout Nichols plays with a variety of virtuosity that couldn't be included in any jazz curriculum. As a player he has capable not only of dark lyricism but also of writing melodies so harmonically adventurous that they can make the listener laugh out loud over their audacity.

Furthermore, his music was in a rhythmic league of its own, and Nichols was indeed fortunate in the drummers he worked with in his brief recording career these Blue Note sides find him in the company of both Art Blakey and Max Roach.

In his lifetime Nichols only put out four records under his own name, three for Blue Note and one for the even smaller Bethlehem label, this time in the company of Dannie Richmond, Charles Mingus's drummer of choice. This date offers listeners evidence of his way with a standard song or two.

The music of Herbie Nichols is undoubtedly an acquired taste. Whilst he plowed an individual furrow he did so with clarity of purpose and vision. The irony of it is that if he were alive today he would probably have to work outside of music in order to make a living. The passing of time has moved several steps away from the recording and marketing of music as idiosyncratic as his. As such, his life was and is a stark example of the gulf between art and commerce.

Our session will be led by Frank Kimbrough, a leader jazz composer who helped create the Herbie Nichols Project. Frank Kimbrough is a New York City based jazz pianist, educator, founding member and composer-in-residence of the Jazz Composers Collective (est. 1992). He has recorded as a leader for OmniTone, Palmetto, Soul Note, Igmod, and Mapleshade.  His most recent duo project with vibist Joe Locke is Verazzano Moon (OmniTone), recorded live in concert, which follows the duos previous OmniTone recordings, The Willow and Saturn's Child, and the Frank Kimbrough Trio (with Ben Allison and Jeff Ballard) recently made its OmniTone debut on the brilliant, live recording Quickening.

As a recipient of funding from Meet the Composer, Kimbrough's own compositions have been the focus of concerts presented by the Jazz Composers Collective, a musician-run, non-profit organization dedicated to presenting original music. These concerts have featured several groups led by Kimbrough, most notably his trio with bassist Ben Allison and drummer Jeff Ballard; and his Noumena group with guitarist Ben Monder, saxophonist Scott Robinson, and drummer Tony Moreno. He is also active in the realization of music composed by other members or guest composers of the Collective, including Ted Nash, Ben Allison, Ron Horton, Michael Blake, Eddie Gale, Joe Locke, Jon Gordon, and the Collective Big Band.

An authority on the music of the late pianist/composer Herbie Nichols, he was awarded a Jazz Performance Fellowship by the National Endowment for the Arts in 1995 to fund two concerts in New York City featuring 24 of Nichols' compositions as played by a dozen musicians in 16 different ensemble configurations. The Jazz Composers Collective's Herbie Nichols Project, with Kimbrough and Ben Allison as co-leaders, has toured the U.S., Portugal, Wales, The Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, and England, and has documented its work with one CD for Palmetto (Strange City) and two CDs for Soul Note Records (Love Is Proximity), Dr Cyclops Dream.  Kimbrough has also written about Nichols' life and work for the journal O Papel do Jazz (Portugal), the New Grove Dictionary of Jazz, and liner notes for The Complete Blue Note Recordings of Herbie Nichols.

Since 1993, Kimbrough has toured with the Maria Schneider Jazz Orchestra in the U.S., China, Portugal, Germany, Austria, Spain, The Netherlands, Italy, France, and Finland, as well as participating in her five-year (1993-98) residency on Monday nights at Visiones in Greenwich Village.  He also appears on her Grammy-nominated CD, Coming About, and contributed to Schneider's collaborations with the Pilobolus Dance Company in 1998 at the American Dance Festival, and at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.

Since 1996, Kimbrough has served on the faculty of New York University's Department of Performing Arts Professions, teaching jazz piano, improvisation, and leading student ensembles. He has conducted workshops at the Paris Conservatory (with Maria Schneider), Oxford University (with the Herbie Nichols Project), The New School, Berklee College of Music, Oberlin College Conservatory of Music, Indiana State University, the University of Iowa, the University of North Florida, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He also served on the faculty of Cannon Music Camp at Appalachian State University from 1989-1996.
 
Thursday, December 4, 2008
Special Event
Paris and the Development of American Jazz: How the French Influenced American Jazz

6:30pm
Location: Museum of the City of New York
(1220 Fifth Avenue at 103rd St. | get directions
$9 General admission, $5 Museum members, seniors, and students | Reservations: 212-534-1672 x3395

During the years between the world wars, a small but dynamic community of African American jazz musicians left the United States and settled in Paris, creating a vibrant expatriate musical scene and introducing jazz to the French. While the Harlem Renaissance was taking off across the Atlantic, entertainers such as Sidney Bechet, Ada "Bricktop" Smith, Django Reinhardt, and Josephine Baker were performing in Montmartre, the epicenter of the Parisian jazz scene.

Charles Hobson, filmmaker and contributor to Channel 13's Great Performances, will show excerpts from his forthcoming film Harlem in Montmartre based upon William A. Stack's bookHarlem In Montmarte: A Paris Jazz Story Between the Great Wars (University of California press, 2001) to be followed by a discussion between the filmmaker and jazz historian and author Jason Weiss.

Click for more information or to purchase tickets. 

Monday, December 8, 2008
Jazz for Curious Readers
George Lewis, Trombonist and Director of Columbia University's Center for Jazz Studies, in discussion with Jonathan Scheuer

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300 or register online

The recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship in 2002, an Alpert Award in the Arts in 1999, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, George Lewis studied composition with Muhal Richard Abrams at the AACM School of Music, and trombone with Dean Hey. A member of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM) since 1971, Lewis's work as composer, improvisor, performer and interpreter explores electronic and computer music, computer-based multimedia installations, text-sound works, and notated and improvisative forms, and is documented on more than 120 recordings. His published articles on music, experimental video, visual art, and cultural studies have appeared in numerous scholarly journals and edited volumes.

Professor Lewis came to Columbia in 2004, having previously taught at the University of California, San Diego, Mills College, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and Simon Fraser University's Contemporary Arts Summer Institute. He has served as music curator for the Kitchen in New York, and has collaborated in the "Interarts Inquiry" and "Integrative Studies Roundtable" at the Center for Black Music Research (Chicago).His oral history is archived in Yale University's collection of "Major Figures in American Music." 

Lewis has worked closely with film/video artists Stan Douglas and Don Ritter, as well as with contemporary musicians such as Anthony Braxton, Anthony Davis, Bertram Turetzky, Count Basie, David Behrman, David Murray, Derek Bailey, Douglas Ewart, Evan Parker, Fred Anderson, Frederic Rzewski, Gil Evans, Han Bennink, Irene Schweizer, J.D. Parran, James Newton, Joel Ryan, Joelle Leandre, John Zorn, Leroy Jenkins, Michel Portal, Misha Mengelberg, Miya Masaoka, Muhal Richard Abrams, Richard Teitelbaum, Roscoe Mitchell, Sam Rivers, Steve Lacy and Wadada Leo Smith.

Tuesday, December 9, 2008
Jazz for Curious Listeners
Deserving Wider Recognition: Andrew Hill

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300 or register online 

Recognized by Blue Note Records' founder Alfred Lyon as his "last, great protégé," pianist Andrew Hill spent 40 years composing, performing, recording, and mentoring young musicians. Born in Chicago in 1931, Andrew Hill began teaching himself to play piano at age 10, and was later introduced to German composer and music theorist-in-exile Paul Hindemith. He started performing in 1952 with touring jazz musicians, including Charlie Parker, Dinah Washington, Coleman Hawkins, and Miles Davis.

He moved to New York in 1961 and shortly thereafter was contracted by Alfred Lyons at Blue Note Records as a leader and a sideman, producing his early classics for the label, such as Point of Departure and Black Fire. Hill's Blue Note sessions with acclaimed musicians such as Eric Dolphy, Kenny Dorham, John Gilmore, Roy Haynes, Joe Henderson, and Elvin Jones cemented his reputation as a musician and composer of some renown.
Hill served as composer-in-residence at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York from 1970-72. In California, he performed in concert and taught classes at public schools and social service institutions before becoming an associate professor of music at Portland State University, where he established the successful Summer Jazz Intensive. He also performed and taught at Harvard and Wesleyan universities, among others.

He returned to New York City in the 1990s, reestablishing himself as a pianist, ensemble leader, and composer. In 2000, Hill released "Dusk," a song cycle loosely based on Jean Toomer's 1923 book Cane, with yet another phenomenal band. The album brought him to the attention of and garnered him acclaim from a larger jazz audience, claiming a place on best-album-of-the-year lists with Fortune Magazine, San Diego Union Tribune, Philadelphia Inquirer, JazzTimes, and Down Beat.

The new attention led to reissues of his classic Blue Note recordings of the 1960s and new issues of some previously unreleased recordings from that time period. One of the most interesting was Passing Ships, a previously unknown nonet recording that prefaced his big band recording in 2002, A Beautiful Day, by more than 30 years. In 2003, he received the prestigious Danish award, the JAZZPAR Prize.  And just this year, Joyous Shout Records released a 1993 duet collaboration between Hill and drummer Chico Hamilton. Liner notes writer Gene Santoro: "How they prod and jab and lure each other, is a marvel to hear."

Thursday, December 11, 2008
Harlem Speaks

Andrew Cyrille, Drummer/educator
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300

Andrew Cyrille was born in Brooklyn, NY. As well as studying privately, he attended the Juilliard and Hartnett schools of music. He has performed with jazz artists ranging from Coleman Hawkins, Illinois Jacquet and Mary Lou Williams to Kenny Dorham, Muhal Richard Abrams, Horace Tapscott, John Carter, Mal Waldron and David Murray. In 1964 he formed and association with pianist Cecil Taylor that would last for 11 years. He played drums for many notable dancer-choreogrphers from the mid to late 1960's.

He was artist-residence and teacher at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio from 1971 to 1973. Cyrille has also taught at the Graham Windham Home for Children in New York. He is currently a faculty member at the New School University (formally The New School for Social Research) in New York City. His sterling work has earned him a number of grants and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts and Meet the Composer, including a commission to create a new work for the Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Company in 1990. In 1999, he received a Guggenheim Fellowship for composition.

Starting in 1969, Cyrille began to organize the first of several percussion groups, including Dialogue of the Drums, Pieces of Time, and Weights and Measures. Some of the distinguished artists who played in these groups were Kenny Clark, Milford Graves, Famoudou Don Moye, Michael Carvin and Obo Addy. Starting in 1988 through the present time, he has toured and performed here and abroad with the renowned Russian percussionist, Vladimir Tarasov.

In 1975, Cyrille formed a band called Maono (feelings) featuring various instrumental voices determined by his compositions. He is a member of Trio 3 featuring alto saxophonist, Oliver Lake and bassist, Reggie Workman. Also, from time to time, he leads another group called Haitian Fascination, playing music inspired by the musical tradition from Haiti. Within the past several years, he has been collaborating and working with musicians such as saxophonist Archie Shepp, trombonist Roswell Rudd, trumpeter Dave Douglas, bassists Henry Grimes and William Parker, pianists Dave Burrell and Marilyn Crispell, and vibraphonist Karl Berger. He continues to record and perform with duo, trio, quartet, quintet and big band formations.

Tuesday, December 16, 2008
Jazz for Curious Listeners
Deserving Wider Recognition: Martial Solal

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300 or register online

Considered one of Europe's best jazz musicians, pianist Martial Solal is relatively unknown in the United States. Solal was born in Algiers, Algeria, North Africa, where he grew up listening to jazz pianists Fats Waller and Art Tatum and was exposed to bebop. In the forties Solal worked in Algiers as a pianist before settling in Paris in 1950. During the fifties he performed in Parisian clubs, often as backup, with many American expatriate jazz musicians.

The early 1960s were productive years for Solal. He performed for several months at the Hickory House, a club in New York City, and appeared at jazz festivals in Newport, Rhode Island; Montreal, Canada; and Berlin, West Germany. When asked in the sixties what he thought the future of jazz and his place in it would be, Solal recalled to Jerome Reese of Musician, "I said that in order for jazz to survive it had to have a repertoire; jazz musicians had to write important works. Just after that stupid declaration everyone did exactly the opposite, playing totally improvised music. Presently there is a return to traditionalism, and I persist in believing that the future of jazz lies in written music, in longer and longer written sequences, which does not exclude improvisation, of course. I also believe that once one has a very definite style, the only way to evolve is through composing."

While most jazzmen went the alternate route, emphasizing improvisation, Solal has scored pieces for big band and various trios with which he has performed since the sixties. "Freedom, for me, means being able to go as far as possible in a certain direction, established and prepared in advance," he told Reese. "But I don't like the idea of 'anything goes.' That's why I play jazz standards, which give the audience something they can follow more easily and which will perhaps entertain them while having to put up with my, shall we say, busy style. Even when playing my own pieces, a major part of my performance consists of humourous musical citations I'll throw in as they pop into my head. But this humorous aspect can only be appreciated if the audience knows the standards I'm quoting. I like music that can surprise you at any given moment, not to show off, but in order to produce something different each time."

At one point in his career, Solal seriously studied classical music to help perfect his technique. Regular daily practice, often consisting of scales, maintains the virtuoso technique that has given him the ability to express whatever he has to say musically. When improvising he explores a melody in a seemingly endless stream of variations, which has given rise to his reputation as a highly technical musician. When the French government commissioned a work from Solal in the early eighties, Solal composed a concerto for piano and orchestra that was played by the big band that eventually involved into the government-supported Orchestre National de Jazz.
While Solal is best known in France for his duo albums with saxophonists Sidney Bechet and Lee Konitz and violinist Stephane Grappelli, he has also composed more than thirty movie scores, including the original French version of Breathless, conducted by Jean-Luc Goddard and starring Jean Paul Belmondo. With the advent of pop music and highly improvisatory jazz in the late sixties, the opportunities for film-score composing vanished.

Through his composing, arranging, and performing, Solal seems to want to legitimize jazz in Europe in general and his distinct style of jazz in particular. "Even if it doesn't sound modest, I think that one must listen to my music several times because of its density," Solal declared to Reese. "If you are surprised by the technical aspect, then the musical content may escape you on the first listening. I have always had very high hopes for jazz. I want people who love classical music to find that same perfection in jazz, and 90 percent of jazz doesn't satisfy that demand."

Wednesday, December 17, 2008
Special Event
Jews & Jazz

7:00pm
Location: Museum at Eldridge Street
(12 Eldridge Street, New York, NY | get directions
Adults: $12 | Students & Seniors: $10 | 212-219-0888

Musicians Yale Strom and Loren Schoenberg will talk about the longstanding connection Jews have with jazz and its Harlem lineage beyond the stereotypes found in movies and popular culture. Roof-raising performances by Hot P'stromi and special guests will illustrate the intermingling of cultures.

Thursday, December 18, 2008
Harlem Speaks
Larry Willis, Pianist

6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300

Once identified with on-the-edge free music, keyboardist Larry Willis had a profitable flirtation with fusion in the '70s, then moved to hard bop in the '80s and '90s. Willis' playing has been frenetic, ambitious and interesting, but during his jazz-rock and fusion days was funky but greatly restrained and simple. A devotee of Herbie Hancock, Willis has found a good balance, with expertly constructed modal solos and also lyrical, relaxed statements. 

Willis graduated from the Manhattan School of Music in the early '60s, then played with Jackie McLean and Hugh Masekela. He recorded with Lee Morgan and McLean in the mid-'60s, and worked with Kai Winding and Stan Getz, as well as recording with Robin Kenyatta in 1969. Willis turned to synthesizer and electric piano in the '70s, doing sessions with Cannonball Adderley, Earl May, Joe Henderson, Groove Holmes and Masekela again. He joined Blood, Sweat And Tears in 1972, recorded with Alphonze Mouzon in both 1972 and 1973, and did dates as a leader and freelance session musician. Willis also recorded with Ryo Kawasaki and Sonny Fortune in the late '70s, and with David "Fathead" Newman and Carla Bley in the '80s. Willis toured and recorded with Nat Adderley in the '80s, and joined Woody Shaw's quintet in 1986. He's done sessions as a leader for Groove Merchant, Steeplechase, Audioquest, Brunswick and Mapleshade, among others.

Fri, 09/16/2011 - 9:18 am
Dorado Schmitt, legendary Manouche gypsy guitarist from the Strasbourg region of France, returns to Birdland to adoring fans.  Schmitt started coming to the Festival in 2002 and has  been a star attraction.  One of his goals has been to introduce his sons, young guitarists, to the NY audience as he did with Samson Schmitt who is now out on his own.  Young Amati joins his Dad at the Festival this year side by side as Dorado did with his Dad in the tradition of gypsy life.
 
Ludovic Beier, from Paris, has been a regular at the Festival on accordion and accordina, a very interesting instrument sometimes called a mouth accordion.  Pierre Blanchard also returns, from France, on Violin.  When he is not joining the gypsies, Pierre performs with symphonies and other top artists, a very accomplished musician.  On bass is Dorado's own bassist from France Xavier Nikq, and on rhythm guitar Francko Mehrstein, also from the gypsy community near Strasbourg.  This is Franco's first time in the big apple.
 
Dorado Schmitt, a Django look alike with  his pencil thin mustache, suffered a terrible accident years ago as Django Reinhardt did in his life.  Dorado's was a car accident that put him in a coma for a long time and damaged his body, but he miraculously recovered.   Django lost two fingers in a fire in his caravan which led to the incredible style of music he created due to his special fingering on the guitar.  Dorado carries on the legacy of Django with the help of other gifted musicians as you will see at Birdland on Nov. 1-6., Produced by Pat Philips & Ettore Stratta who created the Festival in 2000.
 
"...the Nascar of jazz....the audience up on their feet and cheering...a musical worldcup"
                  Will Friedwald of The Wall Street Journal
 
"...the sound of the legendary gypsy jazz guitarist (Django) is irresistable, an earthy exuberance not to be missed.  He influenced most of the great guitarists from Les Paul to Eric Clapton to Jimmy Hendrix, Black Sabbath and B.B King to name a few.  History tells that Django teamed with incredible jazz violinist Stephane Grappelli to form one of the greatest jazz partnerships in Europe, the Quintette du Hot Club de France in the pre-war1930's.  This music has been in Woody Allen's film "Sweet and Lodown", Chocolat...Stardust Memories...with it's driving rhythms and intricate harmonies.  Reinhardt's manouche gypsy jazz possesses the musical elastisity to elicit international aclaim over a quarter of a century later...it makes you feel good".........Elizabeth Ahlford   
 
Each night the Festival has a Special Guest that sits in with the band, a top musician  'living in the US'.  This year it includes Edmar Castaneda (Colombian Jazz Harpist), Jorge Continentino (Brazilian Sax), Borislav Strulev (Russian Cellist), Dominick Farinacci,  Ken Peplowski and more TBA.


Dorado, Ludovic, Pierre, Xavier, and  Franco will tour the country:  Oct. 29 The Kennedy Center, Nov. 1-6 Birdland, Nov. 8th Hudson River PAC in Weehauken - NJ, Nov. 11th Regatta Bar - Boston, Nov. 13 The San Francisco Festival - Herbst Hall, Nov. 14 Kuumbwa  Jazz Center - Santa Cruz - Calif., Nov. 15, 16, 17 Jazz Alley in  Seattle, and Nov. 18 and 19 Sagerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa Calif.
 
Come to Birdland Nov. 1-6 for a joyous evening of foot stomping, smiles, and romance..peek into gypsy culture thru its music.



 
Birdland 
315 W. 44 Street  (bet. 8th and 9th Avenues) 
Great Food      
Parking Nearby
Shows:  8:30 and 11:00 pm     
Cover:  $40 (center seating), $30 (side seating) - 
$10  Minimum

(212) 581-3080
http://birdlandjazz.com/

Sat, 09/24/2011 - 8:32 am
The National Jazz Museum in Harlem October Schedule of Events
 
Tuesday, October 4, 2011
Jazz for Curious Listeners
Lester Young: An American Visionary
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Hosted by Loren Schoenberg
The Count Basie Years
The 1930s solidified the place of jazz in American society and culture as a popular and fine art. Grounded deeply in the blues, and the powerful propulsion that Albert Murray calls the velocity of swing, the Count Basie big band of those years, with Lester “Pres” Young swinging with melodic and lyrical finesse, is iconic to the period. Come dig Young’s counter-statement to the wide influence of the “father” of the tenor sax, Coleman Hawkins.
 
Thursday, October 6, 2011
Harlem Speaks
George Cables, pianist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music
(55 West 13th St., Arnhold Hall, 5th floor )
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
 
Equally skilled as a leader or as a sideman, George Cables helped to define modern mainstream jazz piano of the 1980s and '90s. At the age of 18 at Mannes College, he formed the Jazz Samaritans with Steve Grossman and Billy Cobham. Cables gained recognition during his stints with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, and Sonny Rollins (both in 1969), Joe Henderson (1969-1971), and Freddie Hubbard (1971-1976). He swang with Dexter Gordon (1976-1978) during the tenor's successful return to the United States, and became known as Art Pepper's favorite pianist (1979-1982). In addition to his occasional work with Bebop and Beyond (starting in 1984), Cables appeared in countless situations through the years, and has recorded frequently as a leader, most notably for Contemporary (including the 1979 classic Cables Vision), Concord, and SteepleChase.
 
Tuesday, October 11, 2011
Jazz for Curious Listeners
Lester Young: An American Visionary
7:00pm - 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Hosted by Loren Schoenberg
With Billie Holiday: Two of the same mind
Song stylist supreme Billie Holiday and sound innovator Lester Young shared a spiritual bond expressed in music, beyond the limitations of words. Together, the two captured a jazz reflection of the concept of “soul mates.” Gestures, feelings, nuances of inflection were the stuff of their magical communication. Come hear the bliss, as Loren Schoenberg taps deep into the archives of the jazz tradition.
 
Wednesday, October 12, 2011
Jazz at the Players
Russell Malone, guitarist
With bassist David Wong
7:00pm
Location: The Players
(16 Gramercy Park S. | get directions)
$20 | Reservations: reservations@theplayersnyc.org or 212-475-6116
Russell Malone's first guitar was a plastic green toy his mother bought him. Only four years old, Malone strummed the little guitar all day long for days on end trying to emulate the sounds he had heard from guitarists at church in Albany, Georgia. As a child, Malone developed an interest in blues and country music after seeing musicians on television like Chet Atkins, Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash, Roy Clark, Son Seals, and B.B. King. Then, at age 12, he saw George Benson perform with Benny Goodman on Soundstage. Malone has said, “I knew right then and there that I wanted to play this music.”
Malone is one of the most commanding and versatile guitarists performing. He moves from blues to gospel to pop to R&B and jazz without hesitation, a rare facility that has prompted some of the highest profile artists in the world to call upon him: Diana Krall, Gladys Knight, Aretha Franklin, B.B. King, Natalie Cole, David Sanborn, Shirley Horn, Christina Aguilera, Harry Connick, Jr, Ron Carter, and Sonny Rollins.
Along the way, Malone has made a name for himself combining the bluesy sound of Grant Green and Kenny Burrell with the relentless attack of Django Reinhardt and Pat Martino. After hearing Malone play in Connick's band, former Sony head, Tommy Mottola, brought Malone over to Columbia. Malone's self-titled debut, Russell Malone, in 1992 quickly went to #1 on the radio charts.
Russell Malone was quickly followed by his second album, Black Butterfly in 1993, with Paul Keller on Bass, who later became his trio mate with Diana Krall. Diana Krall's label, Verve Records, came calling next and released three albums by Malone: Sweet Georgia Peach (1998), Look Who's Here (2000), and Heartstrings (2001). Heartstrings features a full orchestra with arrangements by Johnny Mandel, Don Caymmi, and Alan Broadbent, accompanied by the all-star rhythm section team of Kenny Barron (piano), Christian McBride (bass), and Jeff “Tain” Watts (drums).
Malone joined Diana Krall in 1995, contributing to Krall's first four Grammy-nominated albums. For the past year or so, Malone has had the honor and privilege of playing in tenor titan Sonny Rollins’ band.
This performance by a great guitarist is not to be missed!
 
Tuesday, October 18, 2011
Jazz for Curious Listeners
Lester Young: An American Visionary
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Hosted by Loren Schoenberg
Counterpoint: with John Lewis, Nat Cole
Last week we pursued the relationship of Billie Holiday and Lester Young. This week we peer into the musical meeting of the minds of Lester Young and pianist, arranger John Lewis, and Nat “King” Cole, a true style bridge between swing and bebop. Young was a native New Orleanian, and played inventive counterpoint when pared with a brilliant pianist. Join NJMH's Loren Schoenberg for a close listening session to some of Young's most inspired recordings.  Experience vintage clips that remain timeless.
 
Wednesday, October 19, 2011
Tune Talk
“On Green Dolphin Street”
7:00pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
TUNETALK: Where do our favorite jazz songs come from and how did they evolve into standards?
Miles Davis’ version of “On Green Dolphin Street” in 1958 firmly established the song’s place among the standard repertoire of mainstream jazz. But earlier versions, and the original context of the song in a 1947 MGM movie, form a natural history of the song’s existence in the public sphere of jazz.
For instance, there’s an interesting version by trombonist Urbie Green from 1955, taken at a ballad tempo, which features his silken-toned trombone with pianist Jimmy Lyon on the seldom-heard-in-jazz instrument, the celeste.
The 1957 recording by the Poll Winners (of the Downbeat magazine’s readers’ poll in 1956) features guitarist Barney Kessel, bassist Ray Brown, and drummer Shelly Manne, and turned out to be almost the template version for the tune, taken at a medium tempo with a Latin feel. 
 
Thursday, October 20, 2011
Harlem Speaks
Jason Miles, keyboardist and producer
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Brooklyn born Jason Miles attended Indiana State University in the 1970s. At the height of the fusion revolution, Miles returned to New York to immerse himself in the Big Apple session scene and gradually gained acceptance from like-minded innovators in the highly competitive field of electronic music.
His forward-looking synth programming techniques firmly planted his feet in the fusion world, a style popular in the 1970s. In 1979, he made his first recording as a leader, Cosmopolitan, which featured bassist Marcus Miller and saxophonist Michael Brecker. Only recently released, that project kicked off a continuous working relationship with both highly regarded artists. A longtime advocate of electronic music, Miles has been a well-respected figure on the New York studio scene since the '80s as a first-call keyboard programmer and player for A-list artists such as Miles Davis, Luther Vandross, Marcus Miller, Whitney Houston, Chaka Khan, Diana Ross, Aretha Franklin, David Sanborn, and Michael Jackson.
His To Grover With Love project, as well as the recently released Grover Live, which he produced, pays tribute to the rich legacy and memory of soulful saxophonist Grover Washington, Jr.
Most recently, his Global Noize group—the jazz, funk, electronica and world fusion collective Miles co-leads DJ Logic and Falu—released their sophomore album, A PRAYER FOR THE PLANET.

Friday, October 21, 2011
Harlem in the Himalayas
Honey Ear Trio
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
For tickets: RMA Box Office or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344
 
Erik Lawrence, Saxophones, Flute
Rene Hart, Bass, Electronics/Looping
Allison Miller, Drums, Percussion
 
Honey Ear Trio is the new incarnation of Brooklyn based, long time musical cohorts Erik Lawrence, Rene Hart and Allison Miller. Together, these three passionate musicians approach music with playfulness and elasticity. Honey Ear Trio fuses the acoustic sound of a traditional saxophone trio with modern electronics derived from Hart's manipulation of his acoustic bass sound. They also explore mixing multiple genres (jazz, rock, soul, folk) while bending, stretching, and decompressing the rhythmic and harmonic characteristics of the music.
Erik, Rene and Allison have performed as a core group in larger ensembles with Steven Bernstein, David Amram, John Medeski and the poet Robert Pinsky. They also draw upon their wide ranging experience as sidemen and featured artists with Sonny Sharrock, Levon Helm, Marty Ehrlich, Don Braden, James Hunter, Allen Toussaint, Ani DiFranco, Dr. Lonnie Smith, Martin Medeski and Wood, Bilal, Bob Dylan, Brandi Carlile, Branford Marsalis, Trey Anastasio and Anat Fort. The debut Honey Ear Trio recording, Steampunk Serenade, was released in March of 2011. 
 
Saturday, October 22, 2011
Saturday Panels
Lester Young Day: Afternoon of a Basie-ite
12:00 – 4:00pm      
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Come immerse yourself in the recordings and film footage of Lester “Prez” Young, whose influence as an improviser and stylist in jazz is only matched by icons of jazz such as Louis Armstrong, Charlie Parker (whom he influenced), and John Coltrane.
You’ll also learn about his life, and hear excerpts from interviews, as Loren Schoenberg and other jazz experts provide a rounded picture of Lester Young as a man, a legend, and an artist of first rank.
 
Tuesday, October 25, 2011
Jazz for Curious Listeners
Lester Young: An American Visionary
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Hosted by Loren Schoenberg
 
New discoveries from the Savory Collection
The Savory Collection find and acquisition of 100 hours of swing era music with, for instance, the Basie band at the height of their powers in 1938, with Lester Young creating masterpiece after improvisational masterpiece, is what Loren Schoenberg has called “the motherlode.” Selections from full broadcasts of the Basie band at the Famous Door and more will be shared in this last session of focus on the legendary tenor saxophone pioneer Lester Young.
 
Tue, 09/27/2011 - 10:24 am
Dorado Schmitt, legendary Manouche gypsy guitarist from the Strasbourg region of France, returns to Birdland to adoring fans.  Schmitt started coming to the Festival in 2002 and has  been a star attraction.  One of his goals has been to introduce his sons, young guitarists, to the NY audience as he did with Samson Schmitt who is now out on his own.  Young Amati joins his Dad at the Festival this year side by side as Dorado did with his Dad in the tradition of gypsy life.
 
Ludovic Beier, from Paris, has been a regular at the Festival on accordion and accordina, a very interesting instrument sometimes called a mouth accordion.  Pierre Blanchard also returns, from France, on Violin.  When he is not joining the gypsies, Pierre performs with symphonies and other top artists, a very accomplished musician.  On bass is Dorado's own bassist from France Xavier Nikq, and on rhythm guitar Francko Mehrstein, also from the gypsy community near Strasbourg.  This is Franco's first time in the big apple.
 
Dorado Schmitt, a Django look alike with  his pencil thin mustache, suffered a terrible accident years ago as Django Reinhardt did in his life.  Dorado's was a car accident that put him in a coma for a long time and damaged his body, but he miraculously recovered.   Django lost two fingers in a fire in his caravan which led to the incredible style of music he created due to his special fingering on the guitar.  Dorado carries on the legacy of Django with the help of other gifted musicians as you will see at Birdland on Nov. 1-6., Produced by Pat Philips & Ettore Stratta who created the Festival in 2000.
 
Each night the Festival has a Special Guest that sits in with the band, a top musician  'living in the US'.  This year it includes Edmar Castaneda (Colombian Jazz Harpist), Jorge Continentino (Brazilian Sax), Borislav Strulev (Russian Cellist), Dominick FarinacciKen Peplowski and more TBA.
 
Dorado, Ludovic, Pierre, Xavier, and  Franco will tour the country:  Oct. 29 The Kennedy Center, Nov. 1-6 Birdland, Nov. 8th Hudson River PAC in Weehauken - NJ, Nov. 11th Regatta Bar - Boston, Nov. 13 The San Francisco Festival - Herbst Hall, Nov. 14 Kuumbwa  Jazz Center - Santa Cruz - Calif., Nov. 15, 16, 17 Jazz Alley in  Seattle, and Nov. 18 and 19 Sagerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa Calif.
Wed, 09/28/2011 - 1:07 pm

The Annual Jazz Party At Sea is pleased to announce the lineup for the 12th Annual departure, November 4 - 11, 2012. We will set sail from New Orleans for 7 nights aboard Norwegian Cruise Line's m/s Norwegian Star visiting Costa Maya, Belize City, Roatan and Cozumel.

Featured artists include Renee Rosnes Quartet with Peter Washington, Lewis Nash and Steve Wilson, The Judy Carmichael Trio with Harry Allen and Chris Flory, Bill Charlap, Paulinho Garcia, Eric Alexander Quartet with Harold Mabern, Nat Reeves and Joe Farnsworth, Steve Turre, Lynne Arrial trio with Omer Avital and Anthony Pinciotti, Everett Greene, The Winard Harper Septet with Roy Assaf, Stephen Porter, Michael Dease, Bruce Harris, Jovan Alexandre and Alioune Faye, Willie Pickens, Larry Gray, Paul Wertico and Stu Katz.

More artists will be announced shortly.

In addition to this jazz extravaganza aboard ship, there will be a pre-cruise jazz package offered in New Orleans, choose from 1, 2 or 3 nights.

Cruise fares include 7 night cruise with choice of time and restaurant for all meals, entrance to all jazz concerts, parties, rap sessions and events, all customary ship programs and activities, pre-paid gratuities to shipboard personnel, port charges, government taxes and fees. Fares begin at $1239 per person based on double occupancy.

This private party is sponsored by the Annual Jazz Party At Sea Consortium; Jazz Club At Sea (US), Chancery Cruising (UK), and PS Tours (DE). Those persons booking directly with NCL, the internet or elsewhere will not be admitted to these events.

Wed, 10/05/2011 - 10:31 am

John and Debi Medeski have finally realized a two-year long goal of bringing these very special representatives of a disappearing culture all the way from the rainforest of Ecuador to the mountains of upstate New York.  We are blessed by the presence of three elders and healers and their guide who has been living amongst and studying with them for many years.

The evening will feature a very special night of music featuring five acclaimed musicians and a rare performance of indigenous music by the Secoya elders, as well as a presentation about the Secoyas and their land and a silent auction of goods and services offered by a variety of local businesses.  The Secoya elders will be there to visit with people and answer any questions.
-
WHEN:  
Sunday October 9th, 7pm at The Falcon 
(doors open at 5:30 to check out silent auction)

WHERE
The Falcon, 1348 Rte 9w, Marlboro, New York 12542, 845-236-7970 | www.liveatthefalcon.com


Featuring:

John Medeski (Medeski Martin and Wood)-Keyboards
Bill Evans (Miles Davis, Soulbop, Soulgrass)-Saxophone
Billy Martin (Medeski Martin and Wood, Lounge Lizards)-Drums
Mike Rivard (Club D'Elf, Shawn Colvin, Hassan Hakmoun)-Bass and Sintir
With: Philippe Pascal Garnier on Crystal Singing Bowls 
and Steven Bachmann on Didgeridoo

and other Special Guests...

-

The Secoya People

The Secoyas are an ethnic minority of the Upper Napo Region of the Ecuadorian Amazon Rainforest, numbering approximately 350 people in Ecuador and 350 in Perú. Their name, Secoya, means "People from the Multi-Colored River," and in some cases, they are referred to as the "People of a Thousand Colors."  While no one truly knows how far back their lineage dates, their fading population is estimated to have been 16,000 at the time of European contact-so it's safe to say these wise sage's are of true native ancestral lineage.

Secoya traditional elders and healers are the time-honored maestros, the "magicians of the forest," who use over 350 species of medicinal plants. Over 100 of these are found only in cultivation in family gardens and are regarded as family treasures. The Secoya traditional elders refer to their plant lore as an umbilical cord that connects them to their past.

The Secoya religion is animistic; the natural order is explained without recourse to concepts of good and evil. They believe in a multitude of spirits that inhabit natural phenomena such as animals, trees, rivers, and stars. The Secoya believe in a tiered universe, with an underworld, the earth, and multiple celestial realms.

These beliefs become evermore evident through their music-musical instruments include the one-stringed bow and vertical flutes of bamboo. Small drums are also played, and large ceramic trumpets are used for signaling. Men's songs are of the shamanic genre, whereas women sing of domestic life and its problems.  Their songs, profoundly and uniquely cherished, are a guide to the journeys between the universes tiers, a sacred connection to the earth and a calling to all of life's energies.

According to well-known author, Daniel Pinchbeck, who had the rare opportunity to visit with the Secoya almost a decade ago:  "The Secoya shamans, elders in their 60's and 70's...are wise, giggling jungle wizards, and true maestros."

Fri, 11/04/2011 - 1:48 pm

As we spring towards winter, the National Jazz Museum in Harleminvites you to discussions, live performances, and jazz on film that will impress, inspire, and move you from head to toe. For Harlem Speaks, our flagship public program now over seven years in the running, we feature discussions with tenor saxophonist Billy Harper (at the New School for Jazz) and Maestro Maurice Peress (at the museum’s Visitors Center). Jazz for Curious Readers presents David Evanier, celebrated author of jazz vocal legend Tony Bennett’s biography. Our Saturday panel celebrates the Harlem Blues and Jazz Band, which is approaching their 40th anniversary. And you can hear the Harlem Blues and Jazz Band perform live for our Jazz at the Players series, as these elder artists continue the legacy of the swing era tradition in jazz. In a contemporary vein, alto saxophonist Jim Snidero will lead his quartet at the Rubin Museum of Art for Harlem in the Himalayas. And at Stanford University in California, NJMH Executive Director Loren Schoenberg will lead a session on the integration of Latin American and Caribbean musical traditions into jazz. We bring back our popular Jazz on Film series, focusing on Ella Fitzgerald, the famous “Sound of Jazz” film, Ralph Gleason’s “Jazz Casual” series, Dr. Billy Taylor and a potpourri of selections for a holiday celebration.Not only do we invite you to come share in the pleasures of jazz, but we hope you’ll bring a few friends and family members along too! Tuesday, November 1, 2011 Jazz for Curious ListenersJazz on Film: Ella Fitzgerald7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Will Friedwald, author of The Biographical Guide to the Great Jazz and Pop Singers, once wrote of our subject: “Unlike any other singer you could name, Fitzgerald has the most amazing asset in the very sound of her voice: it's easily one of the most beautiful and sonically perfect sounds known to man. Even if she couldn't do anything with it, the instrument that Fitzgerald starts with is dulcet and pure and breathtakingly beautiful. As Henry Pleasants has observed, she has a wider range than most opera singers, and many of the latter, including Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, are among her biggest fans. And the intonation that goes with the voice is, to put it conservatively, God-like. Fitzgerald simply exists in tune, and she hits every note that there is without the slightest trace of effort. Other singers tend to sound like they're trying to reach up to a note - Fitzgerald always sounds like she's already there. If anything, she's descending from her heavenly perch and swooping down to whatever pitch she wants."Friedwald's apt descriptions does wonderful justice to Ella's gift, her voice and style, but since seeing is believing, come experience Ella's swing, scat, and the sheer beauty of her sound for yourself! Thursday, November 3, 2011  Harlem SpeaksBilly Harper, saxophonist6:30 – 8:30pmLocation: The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music(55 West 13th St., Arnhold Hall, 5th floor )FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Texas-born Billy Harper sang briefly in the church and then taught himself saxophone basics with help from a musician uncle who happened to be a classmate of Charlie Parker’s trumpeter Kenny Dorham. While studying music at North Texas State University, Harper was the first black American invited to join the prestigious One O’clock Big Band. After graduating, he moved to New York City in 1966, where he immersed himself in the jazz community, gaining a stellar reputation by playing with greats such as Max Roach, Elvin Jones, Lee Morgan, Donald Byrd, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Randy Weston as well as Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers. Shortly thereafter, Harper formed his own group and was featured on an NBC special about up-and-coming talent entitled "The Big Apple." As the seventies emerged, Harper continued to prolifically perform, mostly as a leader, but also as an influential member of both the Gil Evans Orchestra and the Mel Lewis/Thad Jones Big Band. He released his first album as a leader, Black Saint, for the brand new European label of the same name in 1975. In 1979, had the honor to release the premiere album for yet another new record label, Soul Note. Harper continued to pursue musical excellence in the years following, releasing numerous albums and extensively touring the globe. While still a consistent force on the music scene, Harper expanded his career into the field of music education, becoming a staff member at The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music, Rutgers University and Livingston College. Harper has also been the recipient of three compositional grants, twice from the National Endowment of the Arts, and once from the Creative Arts Program. He also received the International Critics Award for Tenor Saxophone for two consecutive years. Considered one of the premiere saxophonists of the post-Coltrane era, Harper possesses an expansive, genre deconstructing style that fluctuates effortlessly between the many jazz sub-genres, from bop to free and further embraces influences from blues, fusion and even rock music. While never losing sight of the influential sound of previous jazz generations, Harper has carefully carved out his own quite large sound approach. This way, he strives to consciously and continuously push the bounds and momentum of music progressively forward.Friday, November 4, 2011 Harlem in the HimalayasJim Snidero Quartet7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$18 in advance | $20 at door |For tickets: RMA Box Officeor call 212-620-5000 ext. 344Hailed as an "alto sax virtuoso" and a "master musician" by Downbeat Magazine, Jim Sniderohas been a highly-respected bandleader and recording artist for over a quarter century. Since making his first recording as a leader entitled On Time (Toshiba/EMI) in 1984, he has contributed to the art form via a remarkably diverse set of recordings (14 to date) on both major and indie labels. These include Strings (Milestone), for which he composed and arranged for string orchestra. This record was called a "masterpiece" by the Philadelphia WeeklySan Francisco Guardian, Swing Journal and Jazz Life magazine, among others. His 2007 Tippin’ (Savant) recording with an organ trio was a major hit on US jazz radio, topping the charts for months.Monday, November 7, 2011Jazz for Curious Readers  David Evanier – Tony Bennett biographer  7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300In All the Things You Are, award-winning author David Evanier offers an intimate and unvarnished portrait of one of the most beloved singers of all time. Among America's greatest entertainers from Armstrong to Sinatra, Tony Bennett alone is still here and at the top of his game. He has led an amazing life. At age ten, he stood beside Mayor Fiorello La Guardia at the dedication of New York City's Triboro Bridge and, leading the throng of people across the bridge, sang "Marching Along Together." He fought in World War II and helped liberate a Nazi concentration camp. He was discovered by Pearl Bailey and Bob Hope. In the 1960s, he marched alongside Martin Luther King, Jr. in Selma, Alabama, and several of his paintings are in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.Come discover how Evanier documents the life and career of a genuine living legend. Drawing on interviews with scores of Tony's friends, family members, and fellow musicians, and experts on the last 50 years of popular music, he vividly captures the musical history of an era. He brings deep insight into an artist who has stayed perennially young because of his devotion to his art and to humanity.Tuesday, November 8, 2011 Jazz for Curious ListenersJazz on Film: The Sound of Jazz7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: The Maysles Institute(343 Malcolm X Blvd / Lenox Ave (Between 127th and 128th Streets))DONATION SUGGESTED | For more information: 212-348-8300*Note tonight's special location.Perhaps the most iconic jazz television show ever made, The Sound of Jazzbrought together 32 leading musicians from the era, including Count Basie, Lester Young, Ben Webster, Billie Holiday, Jo Jones, and Coleman Hawkins; also featured were individualists such as Henry "Red" Allen, Vic Dickenson, and Pee Wee Russell; and younger "modernist" musicians such as Gerry Mulligan, Thelonious Monk, and Jimmy Giuffre. These players played separately with their compatriots, but also joined to combine various styles in one group, such as Red Allen's group and the group backing Billie Holiday on "Fine and Mellow," one of the most poignant moments of jazz ever caught on film. The song brought back together Lester Young and Holiday; Young's blues solo is transcendent in its painful beauty and sophisticated simplicity.Wednesday, November 9, 2011Special EventJAZZ @ THE CANTOR

WITH LOREN SCHOENBERG

Wednesday, November 9, 2011 | 12:00 pmCantor Arts Center|Stanford University  300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford CA.This season’s lunchtime jazz lecture/demonstration series at the Cantor Arts Center highlights the rich cross-fertilization American jazz has had with musics of Latin America and the Caribbean.Generously funded by The Koret Foundation, the Koret Jazz Project is a multi-year initiative to support, expand, and celebrate the role of jazz in the artistic and education programming of Stanford Lively Arts.ABOUT STANFORD LIVELY ARTSStanford Lively Arts curates experiences that engage artists' and audiences' imagination, creativity, and sense of adventure. Founded in 1969 at Stanford University, we produce and present music, theater, dance, spoken word, and multi-media events. We place a special focus on innovation and risk-taking, and through commissions and premieres are an incubator and destination for new work. Stanford Lively Arts plays a leading and collaborative role in the university's thriving vision of a sustained culture of creativity--one in which the arts integrate with the academic disciplines, flourish as a vital part of campus and community life, and inspire new perspectives on our lives and culture.Saturday, November 12, 2011Saturday PanelsThe Harlem Blues and Jazz Band: A Celebration12:00 – 4:00pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Founded in 1973 by Clyde Berhardt, a blues singer who also holds the distinction of being King Oliver's trombonist, and jazz aficionado Al Vollmer, the Harlem Blues and Jazz Band has as its main mission to keep significant side-men of the Classic Jazz Period working and not forgotten. The continued quality of this group has caused the band to be declared a National Treasure and one of the most authentic Swing Bands playing today. The band has performed at Lincoln Center in NYC, the Ordway Theater in Minnesota, countless Jazz Festivals, as well as main venues in Europe, including the American Embassy and Tchaikovsky Hall in Moscow, Russia.     A documentary about the Harlem Blues & Jazz Band entitled "The Last Of the First" was screened at the Tribeca Film Festival in NYC several years ago, and won an award for best documentary at the Newport International Film Festival in Rhode Island. Come celebrate with us as we hear stories from the band’s travels, and tales from the swing era and even before!Tuesday, November 15, 2011 Jazz for Curious ListenersJazz on Film: Jazz Casual   7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Jazz instructor, columnist and Rolling Stone magazine cofounder Ralph Gleason hosted this half-hour program for the U.S. National Education Television Network from 1961-1968.You’ll witness excerpts from 28 star-studded episodes that featured luminaries such as John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins, B.B. King, McCoy Tyner, Gerry Mulligan, Art Farmer, Charles Lloyd, Paul Winter, Keith Jarrett, Woody Herman, Carmen McRae, MJQ, Dave Brubeck, Paul Desmond, Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra, Dizzy Gillespie, Mel Torme, and Count Basie!Wednesday, November 16, 2011Jazz at the PlayersThe Harlem Blues and Jazz Band7:00pmLocation: The Players(16 Gramercy Park S. | get directions)$20 | Reservations: reservations@theplayersnyc.org or 212-475-6116The Harlem Blues and Jazz Band is the world’s most authentic swing bands. It stars veteran jazz and blues musicians (64 to 93 years old) whose roots reach to the classic period of the 20s and 30s. Together since 1973, these “originals” actually did “jump” at the Woodside and “stomp” at the Savoy, with Duke Ellington, Cab Calloway, Count Basie, Lionel Hampton, “Fats” Waller, Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday and other jazz greats. Come experience the sounds that made jazz a popular art form in the 20th century!Thursday, November 17, 2011Harlem SpeaksMaurice Peress, Conductor6:30 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Maestro Maurice Peress is one of Americas most dynamic and versatile conductors. From Vienna to Beijing, he is internationally recognized by critics and audiences. He has a special connection to Duke Ellington, and a long-standing friendship with the legendary saxophonist, arranger and composer Jimmy Heath.His research in American music has made Peress a leading authority on Antonin Dvorak’s American period and has initiated invitations to give concerts and lectures throughout the USA, Germany and the Czech Republic. His television documentary, Dvorak in America, has been produced for eventual release on Czech and on PBS-TV here in the USA. His knowledge of the genre is now available in a book entitled Living with American Music: From Dvorak to Duke Ellington published by Oxford University Press in 2004.In Dvorák to Duke Ellington, Peress begins by recounting the music's formative years: Dvorák's three year residency as Director of the National Conservatory of Music in New York (1892-1895), and his students, in particular Will Marion Cook and Rubin Goldmark, who would in turn become the teachers of Ellington, Gershwin, and Aaron Copland. We follow Dvorák to the famed Chicago World's Fair of 1893, where he directed a concert of his music for Bohemian Honor Day. Peress brings to light the little known African American presence at the Fair: the piano professors, about-to-be-ragtimers; and the gifted young artists Paul Dunbar, Harry T. Burleigh, and Cook, who gathered at the Haitian Pavilion with its director, Frederick Douglass, to organize their own gala concert for Colored Persons Day.Peress, a distinguished conductor, is himself a part of this story. He worked with Duke Ellington on the Suite from Black, Brown and Beige and his "opera comique," Queenie Pie. Maestro Peress also conducted the world premiere of Leonard Bernstein's Mass; and reconstructed landmark American concerts at which George Antheil's Ballet Mecanique, George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue, James Reese Europe's Clef Club (the first all-black concert at Carnegie Hall), and Ellington's Black, Brown and Beige, were first presented. Concluding with an astounding look at Ellington and his music, Dvorák to Duke Ellington offers an engrossing, elegant portrait of the Dvorák legacy, America's music, and the inestimable African-American influence upon it.Discover the representative anecdotes about Ellington and Peress as relates to jazz and why it is undoubtedly America’s classical music!Tuesday, November 22, 2011 Jazz for Curious ListenersJazz on Film: Dr. Billy Taylor 7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Founding board member of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, the beloved Dr. Billy Taylor, was, in addition to being a superb pianist and composer, a pioneer jazz educator and media personality. Expect filmic examples of the master at work from the late 50s through the next 50 years. Through his example, the memories of those who knew and were taught by him, as well as clips such as those present tonight, Dr. Billy Taylor’s spirit lives!Tuesday, November 29, 2011 Jazz for Curious ListenersJazz on Film: Holiday Extravaganza  7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center

Tue, 11/29/2011 - 9:00 am

This last month of public programming in the year 2012 by the National Jazz Museum in Harlem presents conversations with well-established jazz artists such as Hal Galper and Steve Turre for Harlem Speaks, and live performances by emerging jazz musicians Jon Escreet, Sam Yahel and Dan Tepner for Harlem in the Himalayas at the Rubin Museum of Art. Museum co-director Christian McBride, who recently released the big band recording The Good Feeling and the duet CD, Conversations with Christian, will lead a month long journey into the sounds of the great jazz cities Pittsburgh, Chicago, Detroit, and Philadelphia—his hometown—for Jazz for Curious Listeners. Our final Saturday panel focuses on the centennial of the birth of jazz drumming icon Jo Jones. The panel will be moderated by executive director Loren Schoenberg, and features Jones protégéMichael Carvin, a master drummer and teacher; Bob Mover, a fine saxophonist and singer; Paul Devlin, editor of the recently published Rifftide: The Life and Opinions of Papa Jo Jones; and Stanley Crouch, one of the most important jazz critics of the last 40 years. Thursday, December 1, 2011Harlem SpeaksHal Galper, Pianist6:30 –8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Note location is correct, different than some listings Hal Galper, an excellent jazz pianist and master educator at the New School, studied at Berklee (1955-1958) and then worked in groups led by artists the caliber of Chet Baker, Stan Getz, the Brecker Brothers, Bobby Hutcherson, and with such singers as Joe Williams, Chris Connor, and Anita O'Day. He played electric piano with the Cannonball Adderley Quintet during its last years (1973-1975) and also spent time playing with Lee Konitz and John Scofield.According to one reviewer, Galper’s 1976 record, Reach Out, was one of his best to that point. Post-bop and Latin styling were the playgrounds upon which Galper played, and the feature for Michael Brecker, “I’ll Never Stop Loving You”is transcendent.Galper recorded as a leader for Mainstream, SteepleChase, Enja, Concord, and Blackhawk, and gained his greatest visibility for being a pianist with Phil Woods' quartet/quintet from 1981 to 1990.He’s been on the scene as a professional for about 50 years, so his insights into the changes in jazz and the music scene generally should be telling. We hope you’ll come through for the telling of Hal Galper’s story, and how it intersected with the course of jazz history.Friday, December 2, 2011 Harlem in the HimalayasJon Escreet Trio7:00pmLocation:Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$18in advance | $20 at door |For tickets: RMA Box Officeor call 212-620-5000 ext. 344John Escreet - pianoJohn Hébert – bass Tyshawn Sorey - drumsBritish pianist Jon Escreet has been making waves since he moved to New York in 2006, and especially after graduating in 2008 from the Master’s Program at Manhattan School of Music, where he studied piano with Kenny Barron and Jason Moran.That very year he released a well-received album, Consequences, which featured David Binney (alto saxophone), Ambrose Akinmusire (trumpet), Matt Brewer (double bass) and Tyshawn Sorey (drums). He has also worked in Binney's other musical projects.How young artists balance tradition and innovation is always at question in jazz.  Escreet’s own musical statement tonight will answer the question in his own special way, as his musical vision takes form in the acoustically rich venue at the Rubin Museum of Art.Saturday, December 3, 2011Saturday Panels Jo Jones at 10012:00 –4:00pm Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Special guests include Paul Devlin, Stanley Crouch and Michael Carvin  Papa Jo Jones, the pioneer of jazz drumming in the 20th century, would have been 100 this year. Join us for an afternoon of conversation as well as audio and video clips of Papa Jo in his element of free play and improvisation. Very recently, the University of Minnesota Press released Rifftide: The Life and Opinions of Papa Jo Jones (as told to Albert Murray). Paul Devlin, an expert on the work of Albert Murray, edited the tapes of conversation between Jo Jones and Albert Murray, and weaved together a narrative that becomes a part of a stream of Afro-American story-telling and a testament to the genius and unique voice of Jo Jones. Paul Devlin will be on the panel, and joined by Bob Mover, an excellent saxophonist who knew Papa Jo, master drummer Michael Carvin, a major jazz artist who studied at the feet of Papa Jo, and Stanley Crouch, a major voice for jazz excellence who, quiet as its kept, came to New York not just as a writer, but as a drummer. The afternoon promises to be an exciting time of reflection, swing, and a moment of tribute to Papa Jo Jones, the man who defines the core of what jazz drumming is and what jazz drumming means.Tuesday, December 6, 2011Jazz for Curious ListenersA Month with Christian McBride: Pittsburgh—Steel Town Swingin’ 7:00 –8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300What do these jazz greats have in common other than their jazz artistry? George Benson, Art Blakey, Ray Brown, Billy Eckstine, Roy Eldridge, Errol Garner, Slide Hampton, Earl ‘Fatha”Hines, Lena Horne, Ahmad Jamal, Eddie Jefferson, Joe Pass, Dakota Staton, Billy Strayhorn, the Turrentine brothers Stanley and Tommy, and Mary Lou Williams?They all hail from Pittsburgh.Join co-director Christian McBride in an exploration in sound of the urban jazz and jazz artists that came out of Pittsburgh.Tuesday, December 13, 2011Jazz for Curious ListenersA Month with Christian McBride: Chicago—Windy City Hipsters  7:00 –8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Jazz history weaves through Chicago from the earliest days during the Great Migration, to Armstrong and Earl Hines, the Chicagoans and the Austin High Gang, Benny Goodman and the Swing Era through the bebop revolution and musicians such as Johnny Griffin, and the other-worldly sounds of Sun Ra and AACM. Today, saxophonists such as Von Freeman keep that Midwest flame burning.To feel just how hot the flame of jazz is through the prism of Chicago, let Christian McBride take you on a swingin’journey.Thursday, December 15, 2011Harlem Speaks Steve Turre, Trombonist                                                 6:30 –8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Steve Turre was born to Mexican-American parents and grew up in the San Francisco Bay area where he absorbed daily doses of mariachi, blues and jazz. While attending Sacramento State University, he joined the Escovedo Brothers salsa band, which began his career-long involvement with that genre.In 1972, Ray Charles hired him to go on tour. Woody Shaw, his mentor, brought him into Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers. After his tenure with Blakey, Turre began to work with a diverse list of musicians from the jazz, Latin, and pop worlds: Dizzy Gillespie, McCoy Tyner, J.J. Johnson, Herbie Hancock, Lester Bowie, Tito Puente, Mongo Santamaria, Van Morrison, Pharoah Sanders, Horace Silver, Max Roach, and Rahsaan Roland Kirk. Kirk introduced him to the seashell as an instrument.As fate would have it, while touring in Mexico City with Woody Shaw, Turre's relatives told him that his ancestors played the shells too. Since then, he’s incorporated seashells into his diverse musical style.Turre is known as a member of the Saturday Night Live Band, in which he’s played since 1984. He’s also led several ensembles. One of them, Sanctified Shells, uses the seashell in a larger context, and transforms his horn section into a "shell choir." Turre's Verve release, Lotus Flower, showcased his Sextet With Strings in the spring of 1999. The recording explored great standards and original compositions, all arranged by Turre with the unique instrumentation of trombone and shells, violin, cello, piano, bass and drums. In the Summer of 2000, Telarc released In The Spur of the Moment. This recording features Steve with three different quartets, each with a different and distinct master pianist: Ray Charles, Chucho Valdes, and Stephen Scott.Turre is a very outspoken artist, unafraid to voice his displeasure with the political scene today, so along with a discussion about his life and career, his political point-of-view will also be pursued.Friday, December 16, 2011 Harlem in the HimalayasSam Yahel 37:00pmLocation:Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$18in advance | $20 at door |For tickets: RMA Box Officeor call 212-620-5000 ext. 344A distinctive voice among the new breed of Hammond B-3 organ players on the jazz scene post-Larry Young, Sam Yahel earned the top spot in Downbeat's annual International Critics Poll as a "Talent Deserving of Recognition" for four consecutive years.Buy Now!Since moving to New York in 1990, he’s worked with a string of notable jazz artists including tenor saxophonists Joshua Redman and Eric Alexander, former James Brown sideman and alto sax great, Maceo Parker, guitarists Peter Bernstein and Bill Frisell, trumpeters Ryan Kisor and Jim Rotondi. Yahel also played on Norah Jones' Grammy-winning Come Away With Me as well as on recordings by vocalists Lizz Wright and Madeleine Peyroux. But it has been as a solo artist and leader in his own right that Yahel has made his most personal statements as both composer and player. Come experience one of the most exciting jazz organists of his generation.Tuesday, December 20, 2011Jazz for Curious ListenersA Month with Christian McBride: Detroit—Motor City Soul  7:00 –8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Detroit was a hub of jazz long before Motown Records, and concurrent to the rise of the automobile industry there. Famously, the Jones Brothers (Hank, Thad, Elvin) hail from the Motor City, as do Barry Harris, Yusef Lateef, Milt Jackson, Kenny Burrell, Al McKibbon, Wardell Gray and Howard McGhee.. Cass Technical High School was a training ground for many jazz artists and instructors—Geri Allen, Donald Byrd, Ron Carter and others worthy of note passed through those halls. Christian McBride performs annually at the Detroit Jazz Festival, and has played with the leading lights of jazz from Detroit across several generations. Give yourself the holiday treat of tonight’s free class with the great bassist and educator Christian McBride.Wednesday, December 21, 2011 Harlem in the HimalayasDan Tepner, Solo Piano7:00pmLocation:Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$18in advance | $20 at door |For tickets: RMA Box Officeor call 212-620-5000 ext. 344Born to American parents in Paris, France in 1982, Dan Tepner began classical piano studies at age six at the Paris Conservatoire Paul Dukas. He took a somewhat circuitous route to a jazz career, earning a bachelors degree in astrophysics from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. He played extensively on the jazz scene in college and enjoyed a brief stint as an opera conductor. After graduating in 2005 from Boston’s New England Conservatory, where he completed his masters under the guidance of Danilo Perez, Dan moved to New York and quickly became an in-demand player and composer. Dan has also been named a Cultural Envoy of the U.S. State Department, with recent travels to Azerbaijan, Georgia and the Czech Republic. He has lectured and led master classes at the Royal Academy of Music (London), the Seoul Institute of the Arts (South Korea), the Chopin Conservatory (Warsaw) and many more. He was recently commissioned by the Prague Castle Guard Orchestra to compose a concerto for wind symphony and improvising piano. Titled “The View from Orohena,”the work premiered in the Prague Castle on May 4, 2010. In summer 2011, Dan released a solo album on Sunnyside/Naïve entitled Goldberg Variations/Variations. In this new work, he performs Bach's original variations as written while adding his own improvised variations in between each, thus generating a dialogue with the old master. A contemporary commentary on a revered masterpiece, the project affirms the timelessness and continuity of musical expression. Tonight, the evening of the Winter Solstice, expect an imaginative program with a bright young light in jazz.Tuesday, December 27, 2011Jazz for Curious ListenersA Month with Christian McBride: Philly—The Brotherly Ones 7:00 –8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Don’t Miss tonight’s final NJMH session of the year!Tonight’s session with Christian McBride discussing and playing representative music from his hometown of Philadelphia is likely to be a highlight of this year, and a perfect way to go into 2012. End the old and bring in the new as Philadelphia is given props as one of the mainsprings of jazz in the 20th century. Is it just happenstance that John Coltrane, Benny Golson, Jimmy Heath, Pat Martino, Christian McBride and a plethora of other greats are from Philly? No way. Tonight’s session will reveal why.

Wed, 11/30/2011 - 3:50 pm

Guitarist Dave Stryker, who got his start working with Jack McDuff and Stanley Turrentine stretches the boundaries of the organ sound while keeping the groove deep on his new CD "Blue Strike" (SteepleChase 31729).  Once again Dave teams with young Hammond organ phenom Jared Gold, as well as legendary drummer Billy Hart, and adds to the front line two rising stars with their own sounds; Freddie Hendrix on trumpet and Stephen Riley on tenor sax. 

Dave burns through his new arrangements of Clifford Brown's "Joy Spring", "Daahoud" and Duke Pearson's "Jordu", and rounds out the serious groove of this CD with four of his own originals, as well as a swinging version of Michael Jackson's "Billie Jean".
 
Upcoming Tour Dates:
 
Wed Dec 14
8:30pm & 10:30pm
@ BAR NEXT DOOR NYC
Live Recording!
Dave Stryker Organ Trio
Dave Stryker - guitar
Jared Gold - organ
McClenty Hunter - drums
The Bar Next Door
129 Macdougal(@ West 4th)
New York, NY 10012
(212) 529-5945
 
Thurs Dec 15
7:30pm - 10:30pm
@ MAKEDA
Dave Stryker Organ Quartet
Dave Stryker - guitar
Stephen Riley-tenor sax
Jared Gold - organ
McClenty Hunter - drums
Makeda
338 George Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
(732) 545-5115
 
Fri Dec. 16
7 and 9pm
@ SHANGHAI JAZZ
Dave Stryker Trio
Dave Stryker - guitar
Jared Gold - organ
McClenty Hunter - drums
24 Main St.
Madison NJ 07949
973 822 07940
 
Mon Dec 26
8:00pm & 10:00pm
@ TRUMPETS
Annual Day after Christmas Show
Dave Stryker Organ Trio 
Dave Stryker-guitar
Jared Gold-organ
Billy Hart-drums
Trumpets
6 Depot Square
Montclair, NJ 07042
(973) 744-2600
 
Sat Jan 7 
2pm-3pm
Dave Stryker Organ Trio
Dave Stryker-guitar
Bobby Floyd-organ
Jonanthan Higgins-drums
@Jazz Education Network Conference
Combs/Chandler ST2
Galt House Hotel
Louisville KY
 
Sat Jan 14
8 pm
The Stryker / Slagle Band
Dave Stryker-guitar
Steve Slagle-sax
Ed Howard-bass
Clarence Penn-drums
@The Vermont Jazz Center
Brattleboro VT
 
Wed Jan 18th
7:30 & 9:30
@The Jazz Standard
Dave Stryker NYC CD Release Gig for "Blue Strike"
Dave Stryker-guitar
Freddie Hendrix-trumpet
Stephen Riley-tenor sax
Jared Gold-organ
Billy Hart-drums
116 E. 27th (betw Park/Lex) NYNY
212-576-2232
Tue, 12/06/2011 - 9:38 am
Critically acclaimed jazz-rock guitarist Jake Hertzog is at the Somethin’ Jazz Club for some extreme jazz!  At only 25 years old, Hertzog is one of the most original and exciting new voices on the scene. His new album "Evolution", released this August on Buckyball Records represents his third collaboration with venerated rhythm section Harvie S and Victor Jones and second release on the New York-based label.
 
Hertzog is a frequent contributor to Guitar Player Magazine's Lessons section under the Alias "Hey Jazz Guy" and was the youngest ever winner of the Montreux Jazz Guitar Competition. A wealth of influences and experiences in the jazz, rock and pop world have given Hertzog a totally unique sound and these special one-off shows are not to be missed!
 
Click Here for a special live video of the group in New York, courtesy of Buckyball Records!
 
Jake Hertzog Trio with Harvie S and Victor Jones
Friday, December 9th
Somethin’ Jazz Club
212 E. 52nd Street 3rd Floor
New York NY 10022
8:30 PM
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Thu, 12/08/2011 - 11:03 am

Have you ever worried that there won’t be an audience for jazz in the future?Jazz already represents only a small fraction of the music market and schools are teaching less and less music, much less jazz (if any).  Without exposure, kids don’t even know what they’re missing.  It’s time we take proactive and concrete steps to reverse the situation.Enter...The Jazz Drama Program!The Jazz Drama Program creates jazz musicals for children to perform for their peers.  The Jazz Drama Program seeds the next generation of jazz fans by getting them directly involved with original jazz musicals written for them to perform.  The music inspired by jazz greats is not watered down, but still accessible and attainable for kids and the stories of the shows are tailor-made for today’s youth. Working closely with a team of top artists, educators, and partners, Jazz musician/Artistic Director Eli Yamin and The Jazz Drama Program have developed five jazz musicals in over 50 performances around the United States and abroad.  Last year’s Jazz Drama Program release Nora’s Ark led to a distribution partnership with Theatrical Rights Worldwide.   Now hundreds of schools around the world have easy access to the play.  With it’s second release, Holding the Torch for Liberty, The Jazz Drama Program gets kids immersed in early swing, blues and New Orleans style music and a story about women fighting for and winning the right to vote in 1920.  With support from the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, Theatrical Rights Worldwide, individual donors and Avatar Studios, The Jazz Drama Program still needs $8000 to complete the project.Please join the efforts of The Jazz Drama Program by contributing to our KICKSTARTER CAMPAIGN.  Your contribution is tax-deductible.  Don’t let children grow up without learning the joys of jazz.  Join us in building the future of jazz! If we do not meet our goal by December 31 we will not get any of the pledged support in this Kickstarter campaign.  Please send this link to anyone you think would embrace helping an organization whose mission is to build jazz communities and help us spread the word! 

Wed, 12/21/2011 - 12:48 pm

We kick off the year of 2012 with what’s now a tradition of the National Jazz Museum of Harlem: a month chock full of free events covering the entire scope of jazz as well as live performances in classy venues at a reasonable cost. For Harlem Speaks, our flagship public program of oral histories, we have two of the most celebrated and accomplished musicians on their respective instruments, guitarist Russell Malone and trombonist Wycliffe Gordon. Jazz for Curious Listeners and our Saturday panel this month will be led by Ricky Riccardi, whose recently published book has been a great success in focusing critical attention on the latter days of Louis Armstrong’s career. If Armstrong is the topic, you can be assured the sessions will be a joy to attend. Jazz in 2012 will be addressed head on by a two-month stretch of Jazz Is: Now!, a program built around the talents of co-director/pianist/bandleader Jon Batiste, who will lead the discussion./ He’ll also have his band here, at the new location of the jazz museum Visitor’s Center, which from the beginning of January 2012 will be on the fourth floor in Suite 4D.  Harlem in the Himalayas, at the Rubin Museum of Art, features two trios; the first, Bill Charlap’s,  has been together for years and remains at the peak of their form. The second is a onetime musical conversation between three unique individuals whose music ranges far and wide over the jaz tradition - pianist Jonathan Batiste, guitarist Gene Bertoncini, and multi-reed man Scott Robinson. Jazz at the Players features the return of yet another brilliant trio, led by the award-winning pianist Aaron Diehl. We hope to see you, your family and friends at as many of our events as you can make. It’s a wonderful way to kick off the New Year! Tuesday, January 3, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersLouis Armstrong Month: Birth of the All-Stars—1947-19537:00 – 8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Join Ricky Riccard, author of "What a Wonderful World: The Magic of Louis Armstrong's Later Years," as he discusses the earliest years of one of jazz's greatest bands, Louis Armstrong and His All Stars. Riccardi will trace the beginnings of the group, starting with a concert at Town Hall in 1947, and will discuss the group's early members, such as Jack Teagarden, Earl "Fatha" Hines and Sid Catlett. Also, discussed will be the many pop recordings Louis made during this period that caused critics to dub him "commercial," but provided him with more fans than ever before. Lots of rare music will be heard and some of Louis's earliest television appearances will be screened.Wednesday, January 4, 2012Jazz Is: Now! with Jonathan Batiste    The State of 2012 Jazz   7:00 – 8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Pianist and band leader Jonathan Batiste continues his successful Jazz Is: Now! series in which he and an ensemble explore jazz today, never forgetting the past but always swinging into the future. This month Batiste, now a co-director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem along with Christian McBride and executive director Loren Schoenberg, focuses on the State of Jazz in 2012.Join us and discover the challenges and pleasures of jazz in this modern era in which technology, speed and celebrity often trumps all. But in the hands and minds of artists such as Jonathan Batiste, jazz is sure to not only survive, but thrive! Thursday, January 5, 2012Harlem SpeaksRussell Malone, Guitarist 6:30 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Russell Malone is one of the most commanding and versatile guitarists performing. He moves from blues to gospel to pop to R&B and jazz without hesitation, a rare facility that has prompted some of the highest profile artists in the world to call upon him: Diana Krall, Gladys Knight, Aretha Franklin, B.B. King, Natalie Cole, David Sanborn, Shirley Horn, Christina Aguilera, Harry Connick, Jr, Ron Carter, and Sonny Rollins.Along the way, Malone has made a name for himself combining the bluesy sound of Grant Green and Kenny Burrell with the relentless attack of Django Reinhardt and Pat Martino. After hearing Malone play in Connick's band, former Sony head, Tommy Mottola, brought Malone over to Columbia. Malone's self-titled debut, Russell Malone, in 1992 quickly went to #1 on the radio charts.Russell Malone was quickly followed by his second album, Black Butterfly in 1993, with Paul Keller on Bass, who later became his trio mate with Diana Krall. Diana Krall's label, Verve Records, came calling next and released three albums by Malone: Sweet Georgia Peach (1998), Look Who's Here (2000), and Heartstrings (2001). Heartstrings features a full orchestra with arrangements by Johnny Mandel, Don Caymmi, and Alan Broadbent, accompanied by the all-star rhythm section team of Kenny Barron (piano), Christian McBride (bass), and Jeff “Tain” Watts (drums).Malone joined Diana Krall in 1995, contributing to Krall's first four Grammy-nominated albums. For over a year, Malone has had the honor and privilege of playing in tenor titan Sonny Rollins’ band.Tonight’s discussion promises to be one filled with stories of insight and humor, as any of Malone’s Facebook friends can readily attest.Friday, January 6, 2012 Harlem in the HimalayasBill Charlap Trio7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$18 in advance | $20 at door |For tickets: RMA Box Office or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344Since their first recording together 13 years ago, pianist Bill Charlap, bassist Peter Washington and drummer Kenny Washington have become one of the top trios in jazz. “When I hear our first recording All Through the Night,it sounds like a band right away. I remember thinking wow, this has such a great, natural feeling, like we’d been playing together for years,” recalls Charlap.  “It’s only gotten deeper since.” Come experience just how deep the trio’s simpatico reflects the feeling of jazz!Saturday, January 7, 2012Saturday PanelsLouis Armstrong: Discussion led by Ricky Riccardi12:00 – 4:00pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Guests: David Ostwald, Dan Morgenstern and George AvakianThe last 25 years of Louis Armstrong's life were filled with brilliant music, joyous onstage performances and worldwide acclaim that led him to be dubbed an "Ambassador of Goodwill." But these were also the same years when some of his critics claimed Louis went "commercial" and was soft on issues of race.  All of these themes will be discussed, along with numerous musical and video examples, during a Saturday afternoon panel at the Jazz Museum in Harlem, led by Ricky Riccardi, author of "What a Wonderful World: The Magic of Louis Armstrong's Later Years".Tuesday, January 10, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersPops on Film: 1950-1971  7:00 – 8:30pmLocation:The Maysles Institute(343 Malcolm X Blvd / Lenox Ave (Between 127th and 128th Streets))FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Louis Armstrong left behind thousands of recordings but the best way to experience the genius of Louis Armstrong is to actually see him in action. While conducting research for his book, "What a Wonderful World: The Magic of Louis Armstrong's Later Years," author Ricky Riccardi amassed a large collection of rare Armstrong film and television appearances. Join him for a celebration of Louis at the Maysles Film Center where Riccardi will screen some of the gems of his collection as discussed in his book. Wednesday, January 11, 2012Jazz Is: Now!  with Jonathan Batiste The State of 2012 Jazz 7:00 – 8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Pianist and band leader Jonathan Batiste continues his successful Jazz Is: Now! series in which he and an ensemble explore jazz today, never forgetting the past but always swinging into the future. This month Batiste, now a co-director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem along with Christian McBride and executive director Loren Schoenberg, focuses on the State of Jazz in 2012.Join us and discover the challenges and pleasures of jazz in this modern era in which technology, speed and celebrity often trumps all. But in the hands and minds of artists such as Jonathan Batiste, jazz is sure to not only survive, but thrive!Wednesday, January 11, 2012Jazz at the PlayersAaron Diehl Trio7:00pmLocation: The Players(16 Gramercy Park S. | get directions)$20 | Reservations: reservations@theplayersnyc.org or 212-475-6116Aaron Diehl is a pianist with a singular vision. Still in his mid-twenties, he has already toured with Wynton Marsalis and Wycliffe Gordon, in addition to appearing at major festivals and clubs internationally. Diehl recently won the coveted 2011 Cole Porter Fellowship in Jazz of the American Pianists Association. His trio is a study in concentration and spontaneity, and has received major critical acclaim. This is show not to be missed! Thursday, January 12, 2012Harlem Speaks   Wycliffe Gordon, Trombonist 6:30 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300As a musical ambassador and interpreter of American music, Wycliffe Gordon has had a stellar career touring the world performing hard-swinging, straight-ahead jazz. His modern mastery of the plunger mute and exceptional technique and signature sound has solidified Gordon as one of the top trombonists of his generation. The Jazz Journalists Association named him “Trombonist of the Year” again in 2011; he received the same honor on five other occasions.  In addition to a successful solo career, Gordon tours regularly, leading the Wycliffe Gordon Quartet, headlining at legendary jazz venues and performing arts centers throughout the world. He’s an alumnus of the Wynton Marsalis Septet, the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra and was a featured guest artist on Billy Taylor's "Jazz at the Kennedy Center" series. Gordon is a committed music educator who currently serves on the faculty of the Jazz Arts Program at Manhattan School of Music. Kendor Publishing recently released “Sing It First,” Wycliffe’s own unique approach to playing the trombone.  He was awarded an honorary doctorate in 2006 from the University of Scranton, for his tireless dedication to the field. His work with young musicians and audiences from elementary schools to universities all over the world is extensive, and includes master classes, clinics, workshops, children’s concerts and lectures—powerful evidence of his unique ability to relate musically to people of all ages. Tonight, treat yourself to a conversation with Harlem resident Wycliffe Gordon, and hear tales of the vibrancy of jazz today.Tuesday, January 17, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersLouis Armstrong Month: Ambassador Satch 1954-19577:00 – 8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Ricky Riccardi continues taking his audience through the pages of his book, "What a Wonderful World: The Magic of Louis Armstrong's Later Years," by focusing on Louis Armstrong's incredible mid-950s work. This was a time when Louis made some of his most treasured albums, including "Louis Armstrong Plays W. C. Handy" and "Satch Plays Fats," both of which will be discussed in detail, with rarely heard rehearsals for those albums being shared publicly for the first time.  This was also when Armstrong was achieving new heights of popularity with a hit record in "Mack the Knife," a European tour that was covered by Edward R. Murrow and arguably his greatest edition of the All Stars, featuring Edmond Hall on clarinet.  Riccardi with rare audio tracks and videos, including scenes from Murrow's documentary, "Satchmo the Great." Louis's 1957 stand again President Dwight Eisenhower over the Little Rock high school integration crisis will also be discussed, a watershed moment in Armstrong's life.Wednesday, January 18, 2012Jazz Is: Now!  with Jonathan Batiste The State of 2012 Jazz  7:00 – 8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Pianist and band leader Jonathan Batiste continues his successful Jazz Is: Now! series in which he and an ensemble explore jazz today, never forgetting the past but always swinging into the future. This month Batiste, now a co-director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem along with Christian McBride and executive director Loren Schoenberg, focuses on the State of Jazz in 2012.Join us and discover the challenges and pleasures of jazz in this modern era in which technology, speed and celebrity often trumps all. But in the hands and minds of artists such as Jonathan Batiste, jazz is sure to not only survive, but thrive!Friday, January 20, 2012 Harlem in the HimalayasSummit Trio:Jonathan Batiste, Gene Bertoncini, Scott Robinson7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$18 in advance | $20 at door |For tickets: RMA Box Office or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344This is an evening not to miss. These three players are eclectic in the best sense of the term, sparks are sure to fly in this electric evening of spontaneous invention.  The young pianist Jonathan Batiste (also a co-director of the museum), the elder guitarist Gene Bertoncini, and the veteran multi-instrumentalist and conceptionist  Scott Robinson have all graced the stage at the Rubin Museum of Art separately. But tonight, in an inter-generational mix with endless musical possibilities, the three join forces to create musical magic together!Tuesday, January 24, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersLouis Armstrong Month: Hello, Dolly—1958-19647:00 – 8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Part four of Ricky Riccardi's month-long look at Louis Armstrong's later years will begin with Louis riding high in the late 1950s before suffering a heart attack in Spoleto, Itlay in 1959.  It didn't slow him down as the 1960s found Louis making some of his most challenging recordings with Duke Ellington and Dave Brubeck. Finally, in late 1963, Louis recorded a showtune, "Hello, Dolly," that would knock the Beatles off the top of the charts at the height of Beatlemania.  More rare videos will be shown, such as Louis co-hosting the "Mike Douglas Show" in 1964. Wednesday, January 25, 2012Jazz Is: Now! with Jonathan Batiste The State of 2012 Jazz 7:00 – 8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Pianist and band leader Jonathan Batiste continues his successful Jazz Is: Now! series in which he and an ensemble explore jazz today, never forgetting the past but always swinging into the future. This month Batiste, now a co-director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem along with Christian McBride and executive director Loren Schoenberg, focuses on the State of Jazz in 2012.Join us and discover the challenges and pleasures of jazz in this modern era in which technology, speed and celebrity often trumps all. But in the hands and minds of artists such as Jonathan Batiste, jazz is sure to not only survive, but thrive!Tuesday, January 31, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersLouis Armstrong Month: What a Wonderful World – 1965-19717:00 – 8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 In final part of Ricky Riccardi's look at the later years of Louis Armstrong, Riccardi will chart Armstrong's twilight years, beginning with a triumphant tour of the Iron Curtain in 1965. Trouble with his teeth and the tiresome life of one-nighters gradually began affecting Armstrong as the 1960s wore on, but he continued making memorable music, such as "What a Wonderful World." Riccardi will share many videos of Armstrong's final years, which ended with Louis pushing himself to stay before the public until the very end of his life.

Wed, 12/21/2011 - 3:23 pm

The Louis Armstrong House Museum is offering special guided holiday tours beginning December 1 through December 30.  This holiday season Louis' homemade audio clips will include a rare at-home reading of ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas.Seasonal recordings will also feature: “Zat You Santa Claus” and Nat King Cole sing “All I Want for Christmas is My Two Front Teeth” with an impromptu duet by Louis himself.In keeping with Louis and Lucille’s tradition, the house will be brightly decorated for the holiday season.Unique Holiday GiftsVisitors can stop by the LAHM gift shop for unique gifts to jazz up the holiday season—such as the collectible, hard-to-find, limited edition Ambassador series CDs from Sweden containing rare and previously unreleased material.In addition, the museum features children’s books and gifts including a “West End Blues” Frisbee that looks like a 78-record. The museum has a wonderful selection of books, CDs and a full line of exclusive gifts including T-shirts, tote bags and Jazzmen Rice. The Louis Armstrong House Museum is the only retailer in the Northeast of this Louisiana-grown jasmine rice.

Fri, 02/03/2012 - 9:02 am

A National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master, 16-time Grammy winner, prolific composer and undisputed keyboard virtuoso, Chick Corea has attained living legend status after four decades of unparalleled creativity and artistic output. Corea is regarded as one of the most prolific composers and recording artists of the 20th and 21st centuries. A masterful pianist who is one of the top stylists to emerge after Bill Evans and McCoy Tyner, Corea is equally individual and recognizable on synthesizer. His compositions include jazz standards such as "Spain," "La Fiesta" and "Windows."Corea was born in 1941 and began studying piano at the age of four. He made his recording debut as a leader with 1966's Tones for Joan's Bones and his 1968 trio set Now He Sings, Now He Sobs is considered a classic. In 1968, Corea joined Miles Davis's band during an important transitional period. He started playing electric piano and was on albums such as Filles de Kilimanjaro, In a Silent Way, Bitches Brew and Miles Davis at the Fillmore. When he left Davis, Corea played avant-garde acoustic jazz in Circle. Toward the end of 1971, Chick formed his first edition of the groundbreaking Return to Forever. Fans embraced the group and were able to enter the world of jazz through such important albums as Where Have I Known You Before, No Mystery and Romantic Warrior. Later recordings include The Leprechaun, My Spanish Heart, Musicmagic and RTF Live. In 1985, Corea formed the fusion group, the Elektric Band, balancing it out with his Akoustic Trio.Corea's impact on jazz continues, as evidenced by The Enchantment (duets with banjo virtuoso Bela Fleck), The New Crystal Silence (duets with longstanding collaborator Gary Burton), Returns (documenting RTF's 2008 reunion tour) and Five Peace Band Live (with John McLaughlin, Christian McBride, Kenny Garrett and Vinnie Colaiuta).Now He Sings, Now He Sobs was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999. In 2010, Corea entered the DownBeat Magazine Hall of Fame and was named Artist of the Year in the annual Readers' Poll.UNCW's Thomas S. Kenan Distinguished Professor of Jazz Joe Chambers, drums, is an internationally known jazz percussionist, composer and educator. He has worked with some of the most influential figures on the jazz scene in the last several decades and is also a recognized composer whose works have been performed at Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center. As a sideman and leader, Chambers has recorded more than 500 albums and CDs. He has performed and recorded with Chick Corea, Miles Davis, Freddie Hubbard, Wayne Shorter, McCoy Tyner, Sonny Rollins, Herbie Hancock, Dizzy Gillespie, Andrew Hill and many more. Chambers' credits include Chick Corea's Tones for Joan's Bones, Hubbard's Breaking Point, Hutcherson's Components, Shorter's Schizophrenia and Etcetera, Hill's Compulsion, and Tyner's Tender Moments, as well as Archie Shepp's New Thing at Newport, Charles Mingus' Like a Bird and many others. Chambers' compositions have been covered by Hutcherson, Hubbard and M'Boom; he has also recorded on soundtracks for several Spike Lee films, including Mo' Better Blues.-UNCW Jazz FestivalFriday March 30, 2012 @ 7:30 pmWarwick Center, UNCW campus$50 general public$10 UNCW faculty, staff and students (with valid UNCW ID)Tickets will go on sale NOWTickets and information: 800.732.3643 or www.etix.com

Mon, 02/13/2012 - 5:36 am

The Jazz Committee, Midtown Arts Common at Saint Peter’s Church, will present“Prez Fest 2012 – Celebrating Dizzy Gillespie.” The festival takes place on Sunday, March 4 with a panel discussion on Dizzy Gillespie at 3:30 PM, Jazz Vespers at 5 PM and Concert at 7:30 PM “From Big Band to Bebop to Afro Cuban – The Music of Dizzy Gillespie” includes Dizzy’s celebratory Afro  Latin pieces for big band, arrangements of classic pieces for big band and small ensemble as well as Dizzy Gillespie-inspired compositions.Donald L. Maggin, author of Dizzy—The Life and Times of John Birks Gillespie, will moderate the panel The Life and Continuing Legacy of Dizzy Gillespie at 3:30 PM. Panelists include Stanley Crouch, Gary Giddins, Jimmy Heath and Mike Longo.  The David Sanchez Quartet leads the music at Jazz Vespers at 5 PM. The 7:30 PM concert emceed by Jeanie Bryson showcases two big bands: The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra led by Arturo O’Farrill and the New York University Jazz Orchestra conducted by Rich Shemaria, featuring “Special Guest Trumpeter.” The David Sanchez Quartet also performs. Prez Fest is an annual jazz festival that showcases the talents of jazz legends no longer with us and about whom people should learn more.  Over the past several years Billie Holiday, Billy Strayhorn, Art Blakey and Gil Evans have been celebrated.  The name “Prez Fest” blossomed out of “To Prez with Love,” an annual tribute to Lester Young held at Saint Peter’s for more than 30 years.The Jazz Committee, Midtown Arts Common at Saint Peter’s Church, produces Prez Fest.  Other events produced by The Jazz Committee include All Nite Soul, Jazz on the Plaza (free Thursday concerts at midday, May-August at 53rd and Lexington), and First Tuesdays, (a free professional development seminar series for musicians) in collaboration with Chamber Music America.Prez Fest 2012 is made possible in part with public funds from the Fund for Creative Communities, supported by the New York State Council on the Arts and the Manhattan Community Arts Fund, supported by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and administered by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.Prez Fest 2012 – Celebrating Dizzy Gillespie takes place on Sunday, March 4 at Saint Peter’s Church at 619 Lexington Avenue (at 54th Street.) 3:30 PM: Panel moderated by Gillespie’s biographer Donald L. Maggin with Stanley Crouch, Gary Giddins, Jimmy Heath and Mike Longo. Free  The Dizzy Gillespie Legend Wall – an exhibit about Dizzy. 5 PM: Jazz Vespers — music of Dizzy Gillespie led by David Sanchez Quartet. Free Will Offering  7:30 PM:  Concert — Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra, David Sanchez Quartet, and”Special Guest Trumpeter” with the New York University Jazz Orchestra. $25 Suggested Donation for tickets available at the door. $10 student suggested ticket donation with student ID.  $20 tickets available in advance at www.saintpeters.org/events    212 935 2200. “E” train to Lexington Avenue or “# 6” to 51st Street.

Wed, 02/22/2012 - 10:57 am

MARCOS VALLE is one of the major songwriters of Brazilian Popular music with songs recorded by Sarah Vaughan, Jay-Z, Diana Krall, Chicago, Dizzy Gillespie, Oscar Peterson, Dave Brubeck, Toots Thielemans, Joe Pass, Astrud Gilberto, Bebel Gilberto, Sergio Mendes to name a few. BossaBrasil is produced by Pat Philips and Ettore Stratta.Birdland is proud to welcome him back due to popular demand, accompanied by Patricia Alvi /Vocals, Sergio Brandao/Bass, Renato “Massa” Calmon /Drums, Jesse Sadoc/ Trumpet, Jorge Continentino/ Sax and Flute plus Paul Meyers, a native of New Jersey on Guitar.Valleis also an exciting singer and keyboardist/arranger who has toured the world many times with his Band to sold-out audiences bringing his special brand of music combining Bossa Nova, Pop, and other Brazilian rhythms. In 1998, his “Songbook” consisting of 26 hits was released with interpretations by top Brazilian artists Caetano Veloso, Maria Bethania, Chico Buarque, Eumir Deodato…. From the 80’s to present, his career has continued to blossom. His 2005 CD “Jet Samba” was picked by “O’Globo” newspaper as the best CD of the year as well as the Tim Award for best Brazilian Instrumental CD of 2005.Worldwide performances at Cirque D’Hiver in Paris, part of Festival Ile de France, The Melbourne Festival in Sydney-Australia with Joao Donato, Wanda Sa, and Roberto Menescal..were all huge successes as well as his own performances at The Blue Notes in Japan, London’s Barbican Hall for the 50th Anniversary of Bossa Nova. For Farout Records in 2001, a new CD came out with 10 new songs and a European tour. A recent box set of 12 recordings has also recently been released by EMI Brazil. MARCOS VALLE is a prolific Composer/Keyboardist/Performer who continues to make ‘hits’ and perform the world over.One of Brazil’s most celebrated singers, PAULA MORELENBAUM, will be the Special Guest of BOSSABRASIL with MARCOS VALLE. Having been in The Antonio Carlos Jobim Band for 10 years, Paula continued to explore Jobim’s legacy with numerous recordings, one with her husband critically recognized cellist Jacques Morelenbaum and Jobim’s son Paulo and his grandson Daniel. She received international acclaim in the Trio Morelenbaum2/Sakamoto which featured the prominent Composer/Pianist Ryuichi Sakamoto. The NY Times said of their performance at Carnegie Hall “…delivered Jobim’s songs with a sense of almost holy rapture”.There were many recordings to follow including , “Berimbaum - Tribute to Vinicius Moraes”, “Telecoto-teto” with songs of the 40’s and 50’s nominated for the Brazil Music Award 2009, “Best Album”. Paula has performed at prestigious festivals and venues around the world. She joins Marcos Valle for an historic collaboration in NYC and a Tribute to the most famous Jobim/Bossa Nova song of all time “Girl From Ipanema” and its original vocalist , Astrud Gilberto recorded 50 years ago.

Wed, 02/29/2012 - 5:12 am

This March, The National Jazz Museum in Harlem continues to offer a wide range of top quality free programming and affordable concerts from jazz’s most celebrated musicians, educators and historians. For Harlem Speaks, our flagship public program of oral histories, we have two brilliant and fresh voices on the scene: pianist Matthew Shipp and bassist Ben Williams. It’s a rare chance to hear them talk at length about the whats and whys of their lives. Jazz for Curious Listeners will be celebrating Women in Jazz in honor of Women’s History Month by featuring some of the music’s most vital, and in some cases, overlooked talents. Our Saturday Panel this month will feature an afternoon honoring Ethel Waters, the iconic American singer and actress, who was at the root of jazz singing and whose contributions deserve continued attention. At Harlem in the Himalayas, our longtime series presented at the Rubin Museum of Art, we’ll have an evening with the new music of the Linda Oh Trio. We hope to see you, your family and friends at as many of our events as you can make during this exciting month at The National Jazz Museum in Harlem. You’re bound to meet other similarly exciting, interesting and vital people – like yourselves!  Friday, March 2, 2012 Harlem in the HimalayasLinda Oh Trio7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$18 in advance | $20 at door |For tickets: RMA Box Officeor call 212-620-5000 ext. 344Linda Oh, bassAmbrose Akinmusire trumpet Tommy Crane drums Born in Malaysia, raised in Western Australia, now living in New York City, Linda Oh is an active bassist and composer. Linda has performed with the likes of Dave Douglas, Kenny Barron, Steve Wilson, Slide Hampton, Kevin Hayes and Cyrus Chestnut. She has received many awards such as an ASCAP Young Jazz  Composer’s award in 2008, 2nd place at the BASS2010 Competition, an honorary mention at the 2009 Thelonious Monk Bass Competition and the 2010 Bell Award for Young Australian Artist of the Year. After graduating from Manhattan School of Music, she released her debut trio album "Entry" with Obed Calvaire on drums and Ambrose Akinmusire on trumpet, which received some critical attention. Her second album “Initial Here” is to be released in 2012 features a quartet with Dayna Stephens on tenor sax, Fabian Almazan on piano and Rudy Royston on drums with special guest Jen Shyu on Vocals.Linda has written for large and small ensembles as well as for film, also participating in the BMI Film Composers Workshop. She also has a project with a jazz quartet/string quartet. Her trio will feature Ambrose Akinmusire on trumpet and Tommy Crane on drums. Tuesday March 6, 2012Jazz for Curious Listeners                                                                     Women In Jazz Lil Hardin Armstrong: From Fisk to Jazz7:00 – 8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Lillian Hardin was Louis Armstrong’s wife during the years he made the transition from sideman to leader, and by his own accounts, was the primary motivating factor in that evolution. But what is largely forgotten is her own story, her classical training at the Fisk University, her compositional and piano skills, and her place in the story of women in America. Join us for an evening co-hosted by Chris Albertson, eminent jazz historian and close friend of Lil’s.Tuesday, March 13, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersWomen In JazzIn Good Time, The Piano Jazz of Marian McPartland: A Film by Huey7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: Maysles Cinema(343 Lenox Avenue between 127th & 128th)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-582-6050Hosted by the film’s producer/director, Huey                                                                                In Good Time, The Piano Jazz of Marian McPartland, documents the life and career of jazz legend Marian McPartland as a musician, composer, and host of National Public Radio’s MarianMcPartland’s Piano Jazz. A native of England, McPartland arrived in America in 1948 with her husband Jimmy McPartland and established herself as a leading musician in the male dominated jazz world. Now 93, McPartland tells her own story through interviews filmed over 4 years. The film features McPartland’s own musical compositions and piano improvisations.She is seen performing and regaling audiences with her wit and stories in clubs, concerts, and Piano Jazz recording sessions with Dr. Billy Taylor, Elvis Costello, Dave Brubeck, Diana Krall, Bill Frisell, Nnenna Freelon, Renee Rosnes, Dick Hyman, and others.Thursday, March 15, 2012Harlem SpeaksMatthew Shipp, Pianist 6:30 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Matthew Shipp was born December 7, 1960 in Wilmington, Delaware. He started piano at 5 years old with the regular piano lessons most kids have experienced. He fell in love with jazz at 12 years old. After moving to New York in 1984 he quickly became one of the leading lights in the New York jazz scene. He was a sideman in the David S. Ware quartet and also for Roscoe Mitchell’s Note Factory before making the decision to concentrate on his own music. Mr. Shipp has reached the holy grail of jazz in that he possesses a unique style on his instrument that is all of his own- and he’s one of the few in jazz that can say so. Mr. Shipp has recorded a lot of albums with many labels but his 2 most enduring relationships have been with two labels. In the 1990s he recorded a number of chamber jazz CDs with Hatology, a group of CDs that charted a new course for jazz that, to this day, the jazz world has not realized. In the 2000s Mr. Shipp has been curator and director of the label Thirsty Ear’s “Blue Series” and has also recorded for them. In this collection of recordings he has generated a whole body of work that is visionary, far reaching and many faceted.Saturday, March 17, 2012 Saturday PanelsHer Eye Was On The Sparrow: An Afternoon with Ethel Waters12:00 – 4:00pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Join Artistic Director Loren Schoenberg for film and recordings of the iconic American singer and actress Ethel Waters. Long before Diana Ross, Lena Horne and Billie Holiday, Ethel Waters was acting, singing and influencing American minds about her plight as an African-American woman born in the 19th century. Her art remains supreme, and we’ll trace with film, word and music her incredible life. Don’t miss this afternoon spent with one of the great artists America has produced.Tuesday, March 20, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersWomen In JazzThe Sweethearts of Rhythm: An Amazing Journey7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                The story of the “all-girl” bands of the Swing Era remains a vital part of not only jazz’s development but of the story of sexism, racism and societal attitudes in 20th century America. We will look at archival and documentary film as well as talk with experts in the field about this dynamic and innovative band that left a trail of change everywhere they went.Tuesday, March 27, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersWomen In Jazz: Jacquie “Tajah” Murdock: One in a Million7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Tajah, as she is known professionally, was born in Harlem, danced with Count Basie’s band at the Apollo Theater, worked with many legends of Black Broadway, including Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle, and is herself a prime motivational speaker and historian of American culture. Known to the NJMH family for her steadfast support and spirit, this evening will give Tajah a chance to tell her own fascinating history and to engage in conversation with our audience. This is one evening you will not want to miss, because Tajah is a treasure.Thursday, March 29, 2012Harlem SpeaksBen Williams, Bassist 6:30 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300On the eve of his first CD, State of Art, Ben Williams is one of the most sought after bassists in the world, his resume a who’s who of jazz wisdom:  Wynton Marsalis, Herbie Hancock, Pat Metheny, Terence Blanchard, Christian McBride Big Band, Nicholas Payton, Paquito D’Rivera, Cyrus Chestnut, Benny Golson, George Duke, Eric Reed, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Roy Hargrove, and Mulgrew Miller, to name a few.Ben’s warm, woody tone, flowing groove, melodic phrasing, and storytelling approach has found favor among musicians, but also a larger audience.  A bandleader, musical educator, composer, and electric and acoustic bassist, Ben was the winner of the 2009 Thelonious Monk Institute International Jazz Competition, a prestigious and important award that has propelled many a promising career. Working with New York’s finest jazz musicians even before graduating from Juilliard, Williams showcased his band, Sound Effect, at The Jazz Gallery in New York. Williams has recorded and performed regularly as a member of bands led by saxophonist Marcus Strickland, pianist Jacky Terrasson, and vibraphonist Stefon Harris. He’s led his own groups at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, Harlem Stage, Rubin Museum of Art, Tribeca PAC in New York City, and SPAC in Saratoga Springs, NY. State of Art signals Williams’ emergence as a prominent voice in the greater jazz community.

Tue, 03/20/2012 - 10:00 am

The 13th Annual Central Brooklyn Jazz Festival-Jazz: A Music of the Spirit, March 30 until April 30, 2012 presented by the Central Brooklyn Jazz Consortium.  This music series is New York City's longest continuously running grassroots festival dedicated to jazz.  More than 500 artists will be performing in 40 events at venues from Coney Island to Williamsburg in Brooklyn.  For information contact CBJC at 718.773.2252 or info@cbjcjazz.org. Brooklyn jazz has a rich past and its legacy is celebrated every April, nationally known as Jazz Appreciation Month. CBJC's chairperson Clarence Mosley, Jr. states, "CBJC enters its thirteenth season in presenting the African American art form jazz to the underserved populations of Brooklyn.  We continue to recognize the contributions and creativity of the jazz community of Brooklyn, past and present.  Our forty plus member organization strives to provide jazz education programs and enhance the economy of our community via cultural tourism".  Internationally recognized musicians will perform in community centers, clubs, colleges, and cultural and faith-based institutions. This jazz festival is accessible to all, with 85% percent of the events free or at a cost of less than twenty dollars. Central Brooklyn Jazz Festival has grown from a nine day neighborhood event to a highly anticipated month-long borough-wide celebration. Performers this year will include Bilal Sunni Ali, Kenyatta Beasley, Gloria Cooper, Steve Cromity, Bob Cunningham, Lou Donaldson, Eric Frazier, Winard Harper, Eric Lemon, Sam Newsome, Houston Person, Beareather Reddy, Elijah Shiffer, James Spaulding, The Last Poets, Salim Washington, Rudi Wongozi, Eric Wyatt and more. Performances include a salute to Gil Scott-Heron with Abiodun Oyewole and a tribute to Gloria Lynne by Lil Phillips.  Other concerts: Pucho and his Latin Soul Brothers, Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra, and a celebration of the music of Kenny Dorham and Cecil Payne by the Long Island University Brooklyn music faculty.  Jazz great, Bob Cunningham, will be inducted into the Brooklyn Jazz Hall of Fame by way of an all star jam session. Jazz performers of tomorrow are showcased during a Youth Jazz Jamboree at Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Plaza.   For a full calendar of events see attached schedule. CBJC activities are made possible by the following sponsors: NYS Assembly Members Annette Robinson and Karim Camara; NYS Senators Velmanette Montgomery and Eric Adams; NYC Council Members Albert Vann and Leticia James; CBJC member organizations. CBJC programs are supported, in part, by public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, NewYork City Department of Cultural Affairs, Brooklyn Arts Council andits JP Morgan Chase Regrant Program, New York City Department For The Aging, Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation, Brooklyn Tourism and Visitors Center, and Long Life Information & Referral Network. Central Brooklyn Jazz Consortium/CBJC founded in 1999, is an amalgam of patrons, entertainment venues, faith -based institutions, community organizations and musicians. Over the past twelve (12) years CBJC has presented an annual spring festival, established a Brooklyn Jazz Hall of Fame & Museum (TM), and produced yearly programs that feature local jazz talent. CBJC is a nonprofit corporation committed to preserving, promoting and supporting live music within the underserved communities of Brooklyn. CENTRAL BROOKLYN JAZZ FESTIVAL CALENDAR of EVENTS13th ANNUAL CENTRAL BROOKLYN JAZZ FESTIVAL – Jazz: A Music of The SpiritMarch 30 – April 30, 2012  Fri. March 30 – Sharon Ahnee Freeman Trio, JAZZ966, 966 Fulton St. @ Grand Ave., 8-10pm, $15, 718.638.8910, www.jazz966.com Fri. March 30 – Mz. Lezlie Harrison with Eric Lemon Trio- "Soulful Alto and Distinctive Blend of Jazz Classic", BrownstoneJAZZ at Sankofa Aban Bed & Breakfast, 107 Macon St. @ Nostrand Ave., 8–11pm, $20, 917.704.9237, www.sankofaaban.com Fri. March 30- Salute to Gil Scott-Heron (Abiodun Oyewole, Bilal Sunni Ali, others) presented by National Black Writers Conference & Central Brooklyn Jazz Consortium, For My Sweet, 1103 Fulton St. @ Classon Ave., 9:30pm, $20 advance/$25 door, tixs-1.800.838.3006 ext.1, www.brownpapertickets.com Fri. March 30 – The New Cookers – Hip/Hard Bop Jazz, BAMcafe, Brooklyn Academy of Music, 30 Lafayette Pl., 10-11pm, FREE, 718.636.4100, www.bam.org Fri. March 30 – WMC Allstars Jam Session, Williamsburg Music Center, 367 Bedford Ave. @ South 5th  St., 10-2am, $10 min, 718.384.1654, www.wmcjazz.org Sat. March 31– Lil Phillips/Tribute to Gloria Lynne, Sistas’ Place, 456 Nostrand Ave. @ Jefferson St., 2 sets 9 & 10:30pm, $20 reservations/$25 door, 718.398.1766, www.sistasplace.com Sat. March 31 – Eric Wyatt Quartet, BAMcafe, Brooklyn Academy of Music, 30 Lafayette Pl., 10-11pm, FREE, 718.636.4100, www.bam.org Mon. April 2 – Sankofa Soulz feat King Tut, For My Sweet, 1103 Fulton St. @ Classon Ave., 2 shows – 7:15 & 9:15pm, $10, 718.857.1427, jazzymondays@gmail.com Tues. April 3 – Eric Frazier Open Mic Jam Session - Danny Mixon, Rome Neal, Sheryl Renee, Rustik Tavern, 471 DeKalb Ave. @ Franklin Ave., 8pm, $5, 347.406.9700, www.rustiktavern.com Wed. April 4 – Pucho and his Latin Soul Brothers, Dweck Center Brooklyn Public Library, 10 Grand Army Plaza, 7pm, FREE, 718.230.2100 Thurs. April 5 –Tribute to Kenny Dorham & Cecil Payne presented by Long Island University Brooklyn Music Faculty, Kumble Theater, 7-8:30pm, FREE, 718.488.1624, www.kumbletheater.org Fri. April 6 – Houston Person Quartet,JAZZ966, 966 Fulton St. @ Grand Ave., 8-10pm, $20, 718.638.8910, www.jazz966.com Fri. April 6 Rudi Wongozi ft. Eric Lemon Band, BrownstoneJAZZ at Sankofa Aban Bed & Breakfast, 107 Macon St. @ Nostrand Ave., 8–11pm, $20, 917.704.9237, www.sankofaaban.com Fri. April 6 -WMC Allstars Jam Session, Williamsburg Music Center, 367 Bedford Ave. @ South 5th  St., 10-2am, $10 min, 718.384.1654, www.wmcjazz.org Sat. April 7 – Kenyatta Beasley Quintet/Tribute to Frank Foster,Sistas’ Place, 456 Nostrand Ave. @ Jefferson St., 2 sets 9 & 10:30pm, $20 reservations/$25 door, 718.398.1766,, www.sistasplace.com  Sun. April 8 – Steve Cromity and his Trio ft. TC III open mic jam, Two Steps Down, 240 DeKalb Ave. @ Vanderbilt Ave., 6-9pm, $10, 718.399.2020, www.stevecromity.com Mon. April 9 – Bilal Sunni Ali & ‘The Singing Chef” Ras Chemash Lamed with Song of Life Ensemble,  For My Sweet, 1103 Fulton St. @ Classon Ave., 2 shows – 7:15 & 9:15pm, $10, 718.857.1427, jazzymondays@gmail.com Fri. April 13 – Bob Cunningham Quartet,JAZZ966, 966 Fulton St. @ Grand Ave., 8-10pm, $15, 718.638.8910, www.jazz966.com Fri. April 13 – Pucci Amanda Jhones,ft. Eric Lemon Trio, BrownstoneJAZZ at Sankofa Aban Bed & Breakfast, 107 Macon St. @ Nostrand Ave., 8–11pm, $20, 917.704.9237, www.sankofaaban.com Fri. April 13 -WMC Allstars Jam Session, Williamsburg Music Center, 367 Bedford Ave. @ South 5th  St., 10-2am, $10 min, 718.384.1654, www.wmcjazz.org Sat. April 14 – James Spaulding Expressions,Sistas’ Place, 456 Nostrand Ave. @ Jefferson St., 2 sets 9 & 10:30pm, $20 reservations/$25 door, 718.398.1766,, www.sistasplace.com  Mon. April 16 – The Last Poets Originators of Revolutionary Poetry,For My Sweet, 1103 Fulton St. @ Classon Ave., 2 shows – 7:15 & 9:15pm, $15, 718.857.1427, jazzymondays@gmail.com Thurs. April 19 – Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra, Brooklyn College Jazz Ensemble with Salim Washington, Brooklyn College, 2900 Bedford Ave., 7pm, FREE, 718.951.5655, www.depthome.brooklyn.cuny.edu/isam/ Fri. April 20 – Lou Donaldson, JAZZ966, 966 Fulton St. @ Grand Ave., 8-10pm, $20, 718.638.8910, www.jazz966.com Fri. April 20 – Frank Senior with Eric Lemon Trio, BrownstoneJAZZ at Sankofa Aban Bed & Breakfast, 107 Macon St. @ Nostrand Ave., 8–11pm, $20, 917.704.9237, www.sankofaaban.com     Fri. April 20 - WMC Allstars Jam Session, Williamsburg Music Center, 367 Bedford Ave. @ South 5th  St., 10-2am, $10 min, 718.384.1654, www.wmcjazz.org Sat. April 21 – Jazz! The Women’s ViewPoint, TBA, 718.773.2252, www.cbjcjazz.org Sat. April 21 – Beareather Reddy’s Music of The Soul Big Eyed Blues, 499 Halsey St. @ Stuyvesant Ave., 8pm, $15, 718.919.0697, www.bigeyedblues.com Sat. April 21 – Reggie Nicholson Concept,Sistas’ Place, 456 Nostrand Ave. @ Jefferson St., 2 sets 9 & 10:30pm, $20 reservations/$25 door, 718.398.1766,, www.sistasplace.com Mon. April 23 – L.A. Blacksmith and Band, For My Sweet, 1103 Fulton St. @ Classon Ave., 2 shows – 7:15 & 9:15pm, $10, 718.857.1427, jazzymondays@gmail.com  Wed. April 25 – Brooklyn Jazz Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, SugarHill Supper Club, 609 Dekalb Ave. @ Nostrand Ave., 5-10pm, $20 min, 718.467.1527, www.cbjcjazz.org Fri. April 27 – Harlem Renaissance Big Band,JAZZ966, 966 Fulton St. @ Grand Ave., 8-10pm, $15, 718.638.8910, www.jazz966.com Fri. April 27 – Elijah Shiffer, with Eric Lemon Trio, BrownstoneJAZZ at Sankofa Aban Bed & Breakfast, 107 Macon St. @ Nostrand Ave., 8–11pm, $20, 917.704.9237, www.sankofaaban.com     Fri. April 27 –Bob Cunningham Tribute, Williamsburg Music Center, 367 Bedford Ave. @ South 5th  St., 10-2am, $10 min, 718.384.1654, www.wmcjazz.org Sat, April 28– Youth Jazz Jamboree/Wellness Day, Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Plaza, 1358 Fulton St. @ Brooklyn Ave., 9:30-5pm, FREE ALL WELCOMED, 347.262.3483, www.cbjcjazz.org Sat. April 28 – CBJC Gala Jazz Concert, TBA, 718.773.2252, www.cbjcjazz.org Sat. April 28 – Winard Harper Group/Tribute to Bob Colley,Sistas’ Place, 456 Nostrand Ave. @ Jefferson St., 2 sets 9 & 10:30pm, $20 reservations/$25 door, 718.398.1766, www.sistasplace.com Sun. April 29 – Jazz Vespers with Brandon Sanders Quintet ft. Warren Wolf, Emmanuel Baptist Church, 279 Lafayette Ave. @Washington Ave., 3-4:30pm, $20 Donation, 718.622.1107, www.ebcconnects.org Sun. April 29 – William Spaulding Jazz Quintet, Jazz By The Sea @ Coney Island, venue TBA, 3-5pm, FREE, 718.467.1527 Mon. April 30 – Dee Alexander and Friends Direct from Chicago’s Southside, For My Sweet, 1103 Fulton St. @ Classon Ave., 2 shows – 7:15 & 9:15pm, $10, 718.857.1427, jazzymondays@gmail.com 

Tue, 03/20/2012 - 10:32 am

Critically acclaimed jazz-rock guitarist Jake Hertzog is at the Somethin’ Jazz Club for some extreme jazz!  At only 25 years old, Hertzog is one of the most original and exciting new voices on the scene. His new album "Evolution", released this August on Buckyball Records represents his third collaboration with venerated rhythm section Harvie S and Victor Jones and second release on the New York-based label. Hertzog is a frequent contributor to Guitar Player Magazine's Lessons section under the Alias "Hey Jazz Guy" and was the youngest ever winner of the Montreux Jazz Guitar Competition. A wealth of influences and experiences in the jazz, rock and pop world have given Hertzog a totally unique sound and these special one-off shows are not to be missed!          For a limited time only, Hertzog will be offering two free downloads of live performances recorded at the famous 55 Bar in New York. They are available now at www.jakehertzog.com!

Thu, 03/29/2012 - 10:12 am

Every year since 1974 Highlights In Jazz has honored a living jazz musician for their 'matchless musical achievements'.Previous honorees have included Lionel Hampton, Roy Eldridge, Frank Wess, Roy Haynes, Maxine Sullivan, Hank Jones and Dr. Billy Taylor to name a few.This years honoree is the saxophone master Sonny Fortune.When critics speak of Sonny Fortune, names like Coltrane, Cannonball, Young, Bechet, Hawkins and Parker are mentioned. Quite a legacy - but well deserved - for Sonny Fortune embodies all of the finest qualities of those late, great musicians: hard work, dedication to his art, and exceptional music. Lucky for us, Sonny is still here and blowing hard.The Philadelphia native (born 1939) has been on the jazz scene since his move to New York City in 1968.  Over all these years he's performed and recorded with many of the most notable jazz artists; Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, McCoy Tyner, Elvin Jones, Frank Foster, Mongo Santamaria and Buddy Rich to name a few. He's been a leader of his own groups and has released over a dozen recordings including three for the legendary Blue Note label.He's been featured on CBS TV's 48 Hours with Dan Rather; a featured soloist on the soundtrack for the Jack Nicholson film, The Crossing Guard, and was the subject of a CBS Sunday Morning feature with Billy Taylor. He headlined the first Chicago Playboy Jazz Festival and was the featured jazz performer at the Atlanta Montreaux International Music Festival.Sonny continues to tour with appearances at major festivals and clubs in the U.S., Canada, Europe and Japan.The noted author and critic Howard Mandel had this to say about Sonny Fortune:"Of all of Trane's lasting contributions, perhaps the greatest to the future of improvised music was his example of spiritual integrity and physical drive. Sonny blows with both."-A Salute To Sonny FortuneThursday, April 12th 8PMwith George Cables, Buster Williams, Billy Hart, Robin Eubanks, Lew Soloff

Thu, 04/19/2012 - 11:27 am

The 29th edition of the Burlington Discover Jazz Festival will be held from June 1-10, 2012. The Festival features ten days of jazz and beyond in every nook and cranny of this picturesque locale nestled in the Green Mountains of Vermont on the shores of Lake Champlain.Tickets and general information to help you plan your Vermont visit are available at: www.discoverjazz.com, 802-86-FLYNN (802-863-5966) or FlynnTix Regional Box Office, 153 Main Street, Burlington, VT 05401--Headliners include:Jimmy CliffBonnie RaittDianne ReevesBéla Fleck & the Marcus Roberts TrioLee KonitzChristian McBride & Inside StraightTrombone Shorty & Orleans AvenueNinety Miles: Stefon Harris, Nicholas Payton & David SanchezVijay IyerMary Halvorson QuintetTerrance Simien & the Zydeco ExperienceMarco BeneventoCraig TabornTim Berne/SnakeoilDonny McCaslin GroupJonathan Batiste QuintetAsphalt OrchestraThe Stooges Brass BandChicha LibreBirth of the Cool: Burlington Discover Jazz Festival Nonet featuring Ray VegaKat Wright and the Indomitable Soul Bandwith more music added daily!

Tue, 05/08/2012 - 9:24 am

The annual Django Reinhardt NY Festival now is semi-annual, June and November, due to public demand for this very popular event of HOT JAZZ.  The Festival is produced by Pat Philips & Ettore Stratta.

Returning are ‘THE YOUNG LIONS OF GYPSY JAZZ’ from France headed by SAMSON SCHMITT, guitar great and son of legendary gypsy star Dorado Schmitt, who will return in November.  Samson, out on his own now, is a rising star all over Europe. He grew up alongside his Dad on the Birdland stage having appeared for over 10 years, full of talent and personality.  Samson comes from the Strasbourg region of France, part of the Manouche gypsy culture, and is joined by the very popular LUDOVIC BEIER on Accordion and Accordina.   He is a familiar favorite face on the Hot Jazz scene at Birdland and on tour, along with PIERRE BLANCHARD, great Violinist, both from Paris.

A newcomer last year, French Rhythm Guitarist DOUDOU CUILLERIER,  created a great energy, and his surprise Scat-Singing brought the house down.  Our very own BRIAN TORFF supports the band on Bass and by Hosting the fun on the stage!  Special Guest is EVAN PERRI of “The Hot Club of Detroit”.  Their new CD “Junction” will be released in July by MackAvenue Records.

Top Women In Jazz join each night as Guests: ANAT COHEN/June 19 & 20, GRACE KELLY/21 & 22, and CYRILLE AIMEE/23 & 24.

The DJANGO REINHARDT NY FESTIVAL carries on the legacy of legendary gypsy guitarist DJANGO REINHARDT, but with some new songs and new interpretations keeping it fresh, exciting, cutting-edge…but true to the HOT JAZZ, ROMANTIC, style which has exploded across the US.  It all started at Birdland in 2000 with the launching of the Festival and continued with tours including prestigious venues such as The Kennedy Center, Disney Hall in LA, and The San Francisco Festival. (In November they will again be back at this important Festival as they celebrate its 30-year anniversary at the SF Performing Arts Center!) Birdland, home of Django’s music in the US will be swinging June 19 – 24, joined by great Women in Jazz.

All Aboard! Birdland Django Reinhardt NY Festival
On WORLD YACHT,  August 3rd
With “The Hot Club of Detroit”
For Info:  www.worldyacht.com
Or:  patmusic2@gmail.com

Fri, 05/18/2012 - 6:17 pm

The fabulous Gil Evans Orchestra led by Miles Evans, Gil's son, featuring world-class jazz artists who were long-term members performing Evans' arrangements: from Hendrix and Jaco to the Classics!Gil Evans Centennial Celebration a Moment in Music History! | Monday, May 21st 9PM at Highline BallroomSaxophones: Chris Hunter, Billy Harper, Alex Foster  Trumpet: Lew Soloff, Jon Faddis, Miles Evans French Horn: John ClarkTuba: Howard Johnson, Bob StewartTrombone: Tom "Bones" Malone, David Bargeron, Dave Taylor, Conrad HerwigPiano, Keyboards: Gil GoldsteinKeyboards: Delmar BrownBass: Mark EganDrums: Kenwood Dennard, Bruce DitmasPlus Special Guests: Jimmy Cobb, Airto Moreira, Lenny White, Will Lee, John Simon, Oz Noy, Matthew Garrison, plus surprise speakers, vocalists and others!Master of Ceremonies:  Paul Shaffer Doors open at 7:00 with a pre-show presentation at 8:30PM, with never-seen or heard video and audio clips.  Show starts at 9:00PM.GA seating $20 in advance $25 the day of the show. | Floor and Wing Seating $30 in advance and $35 day of the show.

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 9:01 am

Each year since 1976, the New Jersey Jazz Society has presented Jazzfest, one of the best and oldest mainstream jazz festivals in the entire northeast. This year is no exception as this popular jazz festival serves up nine hours of great music in the air conditioned comfort of two concert halls plus outdoor entertainment, a food court and vendors selling everything from hard-to-find CDs to crafts and interesting merchandise. Featuring the Tony DeSare Trio plus six other swinging jazz ensembles, Jazzfest will take place on the campus of the College of Saint Elizabeth in Morristown, New Jersey on Saturday, June 16th from Noon to 9:00 p.m. Proceeds from the festival go to support the many educational programs of NJJS including scholarships for young students studying jazz at New Jersey colleges.

The New Jersey Jazz Society will honor Bill Boyle, CEO of Boyle Hotels Management Group which owns properties in Morristown, Westfield and Murray Hill. Mr. Boyle, who has been a longtime supporter of Jazzfest and regularly presents jazz artists in his restaurants, will be honored at the start of the evening concert.

The afternoon lineup for Jazzfest includes a Tribute to the great Stephane Grappelli with the Jon Burr Trio and special guest vocalist Lynn Stein. Burr, who played bass for many years with the legendary jazz violinist, will be joined by guitarist Howard Alden and teenaged fiddle player Jonathan Russell.

Opening the festival at noon will be the Harlem Renaissance Orchestra which is dedicated to performing the music of Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Count Basie, Louis Armstrong and other giants of the Swing Era.  On the second stage, the award-winning jazz accordion player Eddie Monteiro will lead his Shades of Brazil group which includes guitarist Paul Meyers and drummer Vanderlei Pereira.

Also on the afternoon bill will be a special tribute to Louis Armstrong, Louis Jordan and Louis Prima with the ever popular Swingadelic.

In the food and vendor court, the trad sounds of Emily Asher’s Garden Party will fill the air and the virtuoso trombonist will be joined by Dan Levinson on reeds, Bria Skonberg on Trumpet, Jared Engel on Banjo and Wycliffe Gordon on Sousaphone.

The evening concert kicks off at 6:00 p.m. with the exciting sounds of Andy Farber’s Swing Mavens featuring the young vocalist Champian Fulton. Although still in her early 20’s, Fulton is earning a reputation as one of the best new jazz singers in the business.  Headlining the evening concert is the great Tony DeSare with his trio. Often compared to Frank Sinatra, DeSare has emerged as one of the most popular young jazz vocalists in the country.

Most of the music takes place in two venues, Dolan Hall in the Annunciation Center and the Octagon Theatre right next door. As an extra bonus, there will be a variety of vendors offering a wide selection of food, hard to find records, jazz CDs, art and crafts of all kinds. Admission to the craft and food court is free to the public.

Jazzfest is made possible through the generous support of Toyota of Morristown, Riker Danzig, the Star-Ledger, WBGO Jazz88, PNC Wealth Management, Boyle Hotels, Hot House Magazine and the Madison Arts and Culture Alliance. The Best Western Morristown Inn is the official festival hotel and offers a special discount room rate for attendees of the festival. The Morristown Inn is located just two miles from the College. For reservations, call 973-540-1700.

The College of Saint Elizabeth is on Route 124 (2 Convent Road) just a couple miles east of Route 287 in Morris Township, New Jersey. Tickets for Jazzfest are only $55.00 in advance, and $70.00 at the gate. New Jersey Jazz Society members enjoy a special rate available through the website. Full time students with valid ID are only $10.00 at the gate. Parking is free and train travel is easy with a station right at the college gate.  The gates open at 11:30 a.m. and the music begins at noon. For more information on tickets and directions visit the New Jersey Jazz Society website (www.njjs.org) or call 1-908-273-7827.

Thu, 05/31/2012 - 3:06 am

This June, The National Jazz Museum in Harlem continues to offer a wide range of top quality free programming and affordable concerts from jazz’s most celebrated musicians, educators and historians.For Harlem Speaks, our flagship public program of oral histories, we have vocalist Michael Mwenso.Jazz for Curious Listeners is devoted to musical world of Ralph Ellison, who wrote brilliantly about Lester Young, Walter Page's Blue Devils and the others he heard in his native Oklahoma City, and also about Minton's Playhouse.Our Saturday Panel this month will be spent celebrating the life and music of composer and lyricist Andy Razaf, featuring live music by Catherine Russell, and discussions led by Razaf biographer Barry Singer.The Joan Stiles Trio and the Stephen Hudson Chamber Ensemble appear at Harlem in The Himalayas, a collaborative performance program with The Rubin Museum of Art.We hope to see you, your family and friends at as many of our events as you can make during this exciting month at The National Jazz Museum in Harlem. You’re bound to meet other similarly exciting, interesting and vital people –like yourselves! Friday June 1, 2012Harlem in the Himalayas                                                                        Joan Stiles Trio7:00pmLocation:Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$20/Door $18/Advance | For more information: rmanyc.org Joan Stiles, pianoMatt Wilson, drumsJoel Frahm, saxophone Pianist/composer Joan Stiles has been gaining recognition for her highly creative approach to the jazz tradition. Her 2nd CD, Hurly-Burly garnered a 4-star review from Downbeat Magazine and topped JazzWeek Radio charts. What’s striking about Stiles is that she’s not beholden to any one era or jazz piano style. Her immersion in Mary Lou Williams’work has opened up jazz’s rich but often neglected history. Doug Ramsey writes, “Adventure, daring, exuberance and wit complement the sense of history coursing through her music…She weaves into her piano styles the blues, swing, stride and boogie that still inspire her.” With her new release, Three Musicians, Stiles is looking squarely to the future, making music that’s as fresh and full of wondrous surprises as any artist on the scene today. Saturday, June 2, 2012Saturday PanelsBlack and Blue: The life & music of Andy Razaf featuring live music by Catherine Russell/Chuck Folds plus Barry Singer, Razaf biographer12:00 –4:00pm  Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Join us for an afternoon celebrating the life of a singular African-American composer whose work still resonates today. Live music will be sung and swung by the brilliant team of vocalist Catherine Russell and pianist Chuck Folds. We are also honored to be joined by Barry Singer, author of the celebrated Razaf bio Black and Blue. As he wrote:Born Andreamenentania Razafkeriefo - a direct descendant of the royal family of Madagascar - in 1895, Andy Razaf's life is a tale of breathtaking lyric talent ending in obscurity. After a brief pitching career in Cleveland with a semi-pro offshoot of the now-legendary Negro Leagues, Razaf turned to songwriting, creating with partners Thomas "Fats" Waller, stride piano giant James P. Johnson, and Eubie Blake such landmark standards as "Memories of You," "Honeysuckle Rose," "The Joint Is Jumpin'," "Ain't Misbehavin'," and "Black and Blue" - more than 800 songs from the bawdy blues "My Handy Man" to the big band hit "Stompin' at the Savoy." His first professional song, "Baltimo'," was performed in The Passing Show of 1913 at the Winter Garden Theatre when he was seventeen years old. He went on to write for the Creole Follies, a 1924 nightclub revue at the whites-only Club Alabam' in Times Square, with Fletcher Henderson leading the orchestra. Keep Shufflin', in 1928, Razaf's first Broadway show, was a jet-propelled musical entertainment ("there is no adagio anything," wrote one opening night reviewer) bankrolled by gangster Arnold Rothstein, who was the victim of a mob hit during the show's road tour. The nightclub revue Hot Feet followed - and quickly moved from Harlem to Broadway as Connie's Hot Chocolates with the backing of legendary gangster Dutch Schultz. A frenzied spectacle of a musical, Connie's Hot Chocolates featured a cast of 85, Louis Armstrong in the pit, and a score that included "Ain't Misbehavin"' and what many regard as America's first race protest song, "Black and Blue." Despite these successes, Razaf was invited to compose only one more musical for Broadway, Blackbirds of 1930. He died in 1978. Tuesday, June 5, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersThe Musical World of Ralph EllisonJimmy Rushing and The Blue Devils7:00 –8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Ralph Ellison loved music deeply, and even considered a career as a trumpeter/composer before deciding on literature. His thoughts about jazz and its place in American culture were innovative and remain essential ingredients in any serious understanding of where we are as a country and how we got here. We will list to music that amplifies Ellison's prose about these formative influences. During his teen years in Oklahoma City, the best jazz band by far was Walter Page's Blue Devils, a legendary unit that served as the root of the style eventually made famous by Page's pianist, Count Basie. Ellison would listen to them whenever he got the chance. Thursday, June 7, 2012Harlem SpeaksMichael Mwenso, Vocalist  6:30 –8:30pmLocation:NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Vocalist Michael Mwenso was born in 1984 in Sierra Leone, West Africa, and began singing and playing piano at age eleven, a year after moving to London, England. He began to develop his love for jazz at an early age by attending concerts performed by such greats as Betty Carter, Elvin Jones, and Johnny Griffin. Michael developed a relationship in his childhood years with the King of Soul, James Brown, when he would perform in London. He often allowed Michael to sing with him when on tour in Europe. While enrolled in the Sylvia Young Theatre School Michael took up the trombone to enhance his musicianship. At age sixteen, he left school to lead his own bands and perform in various clubs including parts of Asia, with local jazz groups. Michael has won various music competitions, such as the Royal Northern College of Music award, and the Arts Educational Young People’s award. He has participated and achieved national and international recognition for his achievements. After Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Michael was asked to be a vocalist in the play “Katrina,” a production by Jericho House in London In 2007, he was invited to run the jam sessions at world renowned Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club, which later became a four night residency at the club. Michael also developed a radio program and an educational program for children to study jazz at Ronnie Scott’s. In late 2010, Michael was personally asked by Wynton Marsalis to join the programming team at Jazz at Lincoln Center and head the After-Hours program at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, where he currently is employed. In his growing yet remarkable career, Michael has performed with Jon Hendricks, Jamie Cullum, Reginald Veal, Maceo Parker, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Wynton Marsalis, and many others. Tuesday, June 12, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersThe Musical World of Ralph EllisonLester Young7:00 –8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Ralph Ellison loved music deeply, and even considered a career as a trumpeter/composer before deciding on literature. His thoughts about jazz and it's place in American culture were innovative and remain essential ingredients in any serious understanding of where we are as a country and how we got here. We will list to music that amplifies Ellison's prose about these formative influences. Lester Young came through Ellison's native Oklahoma City on many occasions long before he made his first recordings in 1936. It is in Ellison's descriptions of hearing the young Young that we get a glimpse of a nascent genius's reaction to hearing an already practicing musical genius. Friday June 15, 2012Harlem in the Himalayas                                                                        Stephen Hudson Chamber Ensemble7:00 pmLocation:Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$20/Door $18/Advance | For more information: rmanyc.org Zach Brock, violin  Christopher Hoffman, cello Steve Hudson, piano, Martin Urbach, cajon/percussion The Steve Hudson Chamber Ensemble's compositions embrace the history of jazz, classical music, tango, and rock with their unique sound and a free spirited love of improvisation. Their newest recording, Galactic Diamonds has been called “a collection of little gems”by All About Jazz; “so disarmingly fun that it’s impossible to resist...a good-naturedly eclectic mix of third stream jazz with a catchy, quirky pop edge”by Lucid Culture; and “consistently engaging”by Christian Carey, Signal To Noise.  The New York City based SHCE  has performed to enthusiastic crowds from Vienna to New York. Praised by Keyboard Magazine for his "exquisite compositions”and for “a quest for beauty in his lines that evoke the masters," pianist/composer Steve Hudson has worked with Steven Bernstein, James Zollar, Marcus Rojas, and Claire Daly. Violinist Zach Brock has performed and recorded with Stanley Clarke, Alice Coltrane, Jack DeJohnette, and the Mahavishnu Orchestra, while cellist Christopher Hoffman has worked with Marc Ribot, Bebel Gilberto, Henry Threadgill, John Zorn, and director Martin Scorsese.  Martin Urbach has shared the stage with Lee Konitz and Dave Liebman.  Tuesday, June 19, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersThe Musical World of Ralph EllisonCharlie Christian7:00 –8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                Ralph Ellison loved music deeply, and even considered a career as a trumpeter/composer before deciding on literature. His thoughts about jazz and it's place in American culture were innovative and remain essential ingredients in any serious understanding of where we are as a country and how we got here. We will list to music that amplifies Ellison's prose about these formative influences. Jazz guitar pioneer Charlie Christian grew up in the same neighborhood as Ellison in Oklahoma City, and his portrait of those years is the only in-depth witnessing we have of Christian's genesis. Tuesday, June 26, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersThe Musical World of Ralph EllisonMinton’s Playhouse7:00 –8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                Ralph Ellison loved music deeply, and even considered a career as a trumpeter/composer before deciding on literature. His thoughts about jazz and it's place in American culture were innovative and remain essential ingredients in any serious understanding of where we are as a country and how we got here. We will list to music that amplifies Ellison's prose about these formative influences. Shortly after moving to New York in 1937, Ellison found his way to Minton's Playhouse, on W. 118th Street in Harlem. Thelonious Monk, Kenny Clarke, Charlie Christian and others were involved in discovering new, creative avenues for jazz there nightly. Those evenings inspired Ellison to write one his most memorable essays.

Tue, 06/05/2012 - 11:26 am

Raucous world-roots string wizards, CFMA winners and JUNO nominees, Sultans of String thrill their audiences with their global sonic tapestry of Spanish Flamenco, Arabic folk, Cuban rhythms, and French Manouche Gypsy-jazz, celebrating musical fusion and human creativity with warmth and virtuosity. Fiery violin dances with rumba-flamenco guitar while a funk bass lays down unstoppable grooves. Acoustic strings meet with electronic wizardry to create layers and depth of sound, while world rhythms excite audiences to their feet with the irresistible need to dance.
 
“Canada’s ambassadors of musical diversity” include 6-string violinist Chris McKhool (Pavlo), dueling guitar czars Kevin Laliberté (Jesse Cook, The Chieftains) & Eddie Paton (Robert Michaels), bass master Drew Birston (Chantal Kreviazuk), and the jaw dropping talent of Cuban percussionist Chendy Leon (Parachute Club, Alex Cuba)!
Since their formation only 5 years ago, Sultans of String have been riding a wave of success, from their debut CD, Luna, and 2nd offering, Yalla Yalla!, both hitting #1 on world/international music charts in Canada, to their triple Canadian Folk Music Award nomination, winning Instrumental Group of the Year.   The band has been recorded live for broadcast on BBC Television, SiriusXM in Washington DC, CTV’s CanadaAM, CBC’s Canada Live, and has topped campus/community radio charts inArgentina, Australia, Belgium, Belarus, Colombia, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, Poland, Spain, The Netherlands, U.S. and U.K.
In the past year alone, they've acquired a JUNO (Canada’s Grammy) nomination, representation from acclaimed promoter David Wilkes (Emmylou Harris, Bela Fleck), and booking representation in the U.S., U.K. and Australia.  They also took home 1st place in the International Songwriting Competition (out of 15,000 entries) and placed as finalists for two 2011 International Independent Music Awards. The band just released their 3rd album entitled MOVE, presenting, once again, an exhilarating celebration of world music styles.
“Canada is a real meeting places of musical influences from around the world” says bandleader/violinist McKhool.  “At the same time, as a band we try to tell uniquely Canadian stories, putting forth our vision of the world as one family.”  Chris’ paternal Makhoul grandparents immigrated to Canada from Lebanon in the early 1900s, and his Egyptian-born mother, an accomplished pianist, also has paternal Lebanese ancestry.  “Growing up, I was taught the values of tolerance, respect for all peoples and celebration of culture.” McKhool’s unbridled passion for exploring the rhythms and melodies has led him to the far corners of the world, incorporating instruments and styles everywhere he went.
Touring as a trio to quintet, McKhool draws from this collective of master musicians to bring Sultans of String to community, festival and intermediate/high school audiences around the world including the Celtic Connections Festival in the U.K., Birdland jazz Club in NYC, Canada’s National Arts Centre, Mariposa Folk Festival, Toronto’s Four Seasons Centre, and Folk Alliance in Memphis, TN.  Sultans of String have also performed on larger stages with Windsor & Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony Orchestras with noted conductor Maestro John Morris Russell (Cincinnati Pops), as well as their Cuban Trumpet Ensemble.

Sultans Of String
Appearing @ The Rochester Jazz Festival
Sat., June 23rd
8:30 & 10:00 PM

Wed, 06/06/2012 - 12:28 pm

Each year since 1976, the New Jersey Jazz Society has presented Jazzfest, one of the best and oldest mainstream jazz festivals in the entire northeast. This year is no exception as this popular jazz festival serves up nine hours of great music in the air conditioned comfort of two concert halls plus outdoor entertainment, a food court and vendors selling everything from hard-to-find CDs to crafts and interesting merchandise. Featuring the Tony DeSare Trio plus six other swinging jazz ensembles, Jazzfest will take place on the campus of the College of Saint Elizabeth in Morristown, New Jersey on Saturday, June 16th from Noon to 9:00 p.m. Proceeds from the festival go to support the many educational programs of NJJS including scholarships for young students studying jazz at New Jersey colleges.The New Jersey Jazz Society will honor Bill Boyle, CEO of Boyle Hotels Management Group which owns properties in Morristown, Westfield and Murray Hill. Mr. Boyle, who has been a longtime supporter of Jazzfest and regularly presents jazz artists in his restaurants, will be honored at the start of the evening concert.The afternoon lineup for Jazzfest includes a Tribute to the great Stephane Grappelli with the Jon Burr Trio and special guest vocalist Lynn Stein. Burr, who played bass for many years with the legendary jazz violinist, will be joined by guitarist Howard Alden and teenaged fiddle player Jonathan Russell.Opening the festival at noon will be the Harlem Renaissance Orchestra which is dedicated to performing the music of Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Count Basie, Louis Armstrong and other giants of the Swing Era.  On the second stage, the award-winning jazz accordion player Eddie Monteiro will lead his Shades of Brazil group which includes guitarist Paul Meyers and drummer Vanderlei Pereira.Also on the afternoon bill will be a special tribute to Louis Armstrong, Louis Jordan and Louis Prima with the ever popular Swingadelic.In the food and vendor court, the trad sounds of Emily Asher’s Garden Party will fill the air and the virtuoso trombonist will be joined by Dan Levinson on reeds, Bria Skonberg on Trumpet, Jared Engel on Banjo and Wycliffe Gordon on Sousaphone.The evening concert kicks off at 6:00 p.m. with the exciting sounds of Andy Farber’s Swing Mavens featuring the young vocalist Champian Fulton. Although still in her early 20’s, Fulton is earning a reputation as one of the best new jazz singers in the business.  Headlining the evening concert is the great Tony DeSare with his trio. Often compared to Frank Sinatra, DeSare has emerged as one of the most popular young jazz vocalists in the country.Most of the music takes place in two venues, Dolan Hall in the Annunciation Center and the Octagon Theatre right next door. As an extra bonus, there will be a variety of vendors offering a wide selection of food, hard to find records, jazz CDs, art and crafts of all kinds. Admission to the craft and food court is free to the public.Jazzfest is made possible through the generous support of Toyota of Morristown, Riker Danzig, the Star-Ledger, WBGO Jazz88, PNC Wealth Management, Boyle Hotels, Hot House Magazine and the Madison Arts and Culture Alliance. The Best Western Morristown Inn is the official festival hotel and offers a special discount room rate for attendees of the festival. The Morristown Inn is located just two miles from the College. For reservations, call 973-540-1700.The College of Saint Elizabeth is on Route 124 (2 Convent Road) just a couple miles east of Route 287 in Morris Township, New Jersey. Tickets for Jazzfest are only $55.00 in advance, and $70.00 at the gate. New Jersey Jazz Society members enjoy a special rate available through the website. Full time students with valid ID are only $10.00 at the gate. Parking is free and train travel is easy with a station right at the college gate.  The gates open at 11:30 a.m. and the music begins at noon. For more information on tickets and directions visit the New Jersey Jazz Society website (www.njjs.org) or call 1-908-273-7827.

Thu, 07/05/2012 - 4:25 pm

The successful Birdland Django Reinhardt Festival will expand this summer  by joining with WORLD YACHT for a cruise around Manhattan to the live musical style of the great Django Reinhardt, performed by one of America's top hot jazz bands, "The Hot Club of Detroit", showcasing some of the music from their new release 'Junction' on Mackavenue Records.  The band is a versatile modern hot jazz group, with a unique acoustic-electric sound.The Festival, produced by Pat Philips and Ettore Stratta, was launched in 2000 and continues twice a year, November and June, at the legendary music venue, Birdland, with tours across the country as well with the Festival Allstars who will be featured at the 30th Annivesary of the San Francisco Festival in November, among other bookings.On August 3rd, the producers will feature THE HOT CLUB OF DETROIT aboard WOLD YACHT at Pier 81, New York City's premiere desitnation on the Hudson River.  The cruise will take passengers down the Hudson River, past the Statue of Liberty, partially up the East River and back to Pier 81 at West 41st Street.  The vessel is two levels with spacious outdoor decks and floating rooftop lounge.Grab your partner, friends, family and come on board for a fun-filled musical experience aboard one of NY's finest ships and escape as you cruise past the skyline of Manhattan with the sun setting on the Hudson.HOT JAZZ ON THE HUDSON!   Reservations:  Online at www.worldyacht.com  Info:   patmusic2@gmail.com Boarding begins at 7pm, Sailing from 8pm-10:00 pm. Tickets:  $ 65 (one drink included)Food Available for Purchase on board

Fri, 08/03/2012 - 11:15 am

This August, The National Jazz Museum in Harlem continues to offer a wide range of top quality free programming and affordable concerts from jazz’s most celebrated musicians, educators and historians.Harlem Speaks, our flagship public program of oral histories, will feature two acclaimed drummers and educators, Nasheet Waits and Ralph Peterson, Jr.Artistic Advisor and bassist Christian McBride will be hosting a month of jazz in the movies, from the 1950s to the modern era for this month’s Jazz For Curious Listeners.NJMH’s Jonathan Batiste adds another program to his activities here, initiating Spontaneous Combustion, a new performance series that incorporates new talent on a weekly basis. We’ll be doing these downtown, at the hipper than hip Rockwood Music Hall. Make Tuesday nights your NJMH night this month, starting at the Visitors Center with Christian McBride, and then continuing the party with Jonathan downtown.Trumpeter Brian Lynch and pianist Emmet Cohen will appear at Harlem in The Himalayas, a collaborative performance program with The Rubin Museum of Art.Our commitment to presenting the best in Latin Jazz continues with Papo Vasquez and the NJMH Latin Jazz All Stars, appearing outdoors at Orchard Beach.So, as you can see, it’s an action packed month for us, as usual. We hope to see you, your family and friends at as many of our events as you can make during this exciting month at The National Jazz Museum in Harlem. You’re bound to meet other similarly exciting, interesting and vital people – like yourselves! Friday, August 3, 2012Harlem in the Himalayas                                                                         Brian Lynch7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$20/Door $18/Advance | For more information: rmanyc.org A vital force and emergent legend within both the hardcore straight ahead and Latin Jazz communities, Grammy Award Winner Brian Lynch is as comfortable negotiating the complexities of clave with Afro-Caribbean pioneer Eddie Palmieri as he is swinging through advanced harmony with bebop maestro Phil Woods. A honored graduate of two of the jazz world’s most distinguished academies, Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers and the Horace Silver Quintet, he has been a valued collaborator with jazz artists such as Benny Golson, Toshiko Akiyoshi, and Charles McPherson; Latin music icons as diverse as Hector LaVoe and Lila Downs; and pop luminaries such as Prince. As a bandleader and recording artist he has released 19 critically acclaimed CDs featuring his distinctive composing and arranging, and toured the world with various ensembles reflecting the wide sweep of his music. He currently is Professor of Jazz Trumpet at the Frost School Of Music, University of Miami as well as conducting clinics, residencies and workshops at prestigious institutions of learning the world over. His talents have been recognized by top placing in the Downbeat Critics and Readers Polls (#3 Trumpet 2011 Critics Poll); highly rated reviews for his work in Downbeat, Jazziz and Jazz Times; 2005 and 2007 Grammy award nominations, and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, Chamber Music America, and Meet The Composer. Tuesday, August 7, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersA Month With Christian McBrideJazz In The Movies: The 50s7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Join Grammy Award winner, jazz bassist/composer/bandleader and NJMH stalwart Christian McBride as he shares jazz written expressively for the movies during the Truman/Eisenhower era. These sessions are interactive, with lots of back and forth with the audience and Christian, who is famously charismatic and also very funny, and oh yes, one of the greatest musicians on the planet. His take on how Hollywood used jazz as a subject and as music is original and challenging. Please don’t miss this special series. We love it when Christian’s here, and you will too. Tuesday, August 7, 2012Spontaneous Combustion!Hosted by Jonathan Batiste9:30 – 10:30pmLocation: Rockwood Music Hall(196 Allen Street between E. Houston St. & Stanton St.)$10 Cover | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Jonathan Batiste recently kicked off the TED Conference in Scotland to great acclaim (in the midst of his band’s European tour) and returns home to the NJMH and new York at a new venue: Rockwood Music Hall, where he will inaugurate Spontaneous Combustion!, featuring his band joined by young artists of all genres, some of which will be well known, and many of which you will be hearing about for the first time. All of Jonathan’s NJMH programs (including Jazz Is:Now!, which returns next month) are packed to the gills with curious people who share in an intensely personal experience. Make Tuesday nights your NJMH night this month, starting at the Visitors Center with Christian McBride, and then continuing the party with Jonathan downtown. Tuesday, August 14, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersA Month With Christian McBrideJazz In The Movies: The 60s7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Join Grammy Award winner, jazz bassist/composer/bandleader and NJMH stalwart Christian McBride as he shares jazz written expressively for the movies during the Kennedy/Johnson era. These sessions are interactive, with lots of back and forth with the audience and Christian, who is famously charismatic and also very funny, and oh yes, one of the greatest musicians on the planet. His take on how Hollywood used jazz as a subject and as music is original and challenging. Please don’t miss this special series. We love it when Christian’s here, and you will too. Tuesday, August 14, 2012Spontaneous Combustion!Hosted by Jonathan Batiste9:30 – 10:30pmLocation: Rockwood Music Hall(196 Allen Street between E. Houston St. & Stanton St.)$10 Cover | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Jonathan Batiste recently kicked off the TED Conference to great acclaim (in the midst of his band’s European tour) and returns home to the NJMH and new York at a new venue: Rockwood Music Hall, where he will inaugurate Spontaneous Combustion!, featuring his band joined by young artists of all genres, some of which will be well known, and many of which you will be hearing about for the first time. All of Jonathan’s NJMH programs (including Jazz Is:Now!, which returns next month) are packed to the gills with curious people who share in an intensely personal experience. Make Tuesday nights your NJMH night this month, starting at the Visitors Center with Christian McBride, and then continuing the party with Jonathan downtown.  Thursday, August 16, 2012Harlem SpeaksNasheet Waits, Drummer6:30 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Nasheet Waits, drummer/music educator, is a New York native. His interest in playing the drums was encouraged by his father, legendary percussionist, Frederick Waits. Over the course of his career, Freddie Waits played with such legendary artists as Ella Fitzgerald, Sonny Rollins, Max Roach, McCoy Tyner, and countless others. Nasheet has been a member of Andrew Hill's various bands, Jason Moran's Bandwagon, and Fred Hersch's trio. As an originating member of pianist Jason Moran's Bandwagon, Jason, bassist Tarus Mateen, and Nasheet have been deemed, "the most exciting rhythm section in jazz" by JazzTimes, The 2001 recording "Black Stars" with the Bandwagon, featuring Sam Rivers was named the "Best CD of 2001" in (Jazz Times, Jan 2002) and "The New York Times".Nasheet's recording and performing discography is a veritable who's who in Jazz, boasting stints with jazz notables such as Geri Allen, Mario Bauza, Hamiett Bluiett, Abraham Burton, Ron Carter, Marc Cary, Steve Coleman, Stanley Cowell, Orrin Evans, Stefon Harris, Andrew Hill, Bill Lee, Jackie McLean, The Mingus Big Band, The New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, Greg Osby, Joshua Redman, Vanessa Rubin, Antoine Roney, Wallace Roney, Jacky Terrason, Bunky Green, and Mark Turner. Waits has recorded and toured extensively in Africa, Europe, Japan, Canada, South America and the United States. Friday, August 17, 2012Harlem in the Himalayas                                                                         Emmet Cohen7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$20/Door $18/Advance | For more information: rmanyc.org At 22, jazz piano prodigy Emmet Cohen plays with the maturity and confidence of a seasoned veteran. With astonishing technique and an innovative harmonic palate, Emmet engenders a deep musical bond with his audience. He has shared the bandstand with a plethora of Jazz luminaries, including Christian McBride, Joshua Redman, Patti Austin, Maceo Parker, Carmen Bradford, Billy Hart, and many others. Emmet recently finished his debut album, “In the Element” featuring Joe Sanders and Rodney Green, receiving many positive reviews. Emmet is currently pursuing a music degree at the University of Miami’s Frost School of Music, studying with the esteemed pianist and educator, Shelly Berg and Martin Bejerano. Emmet is also an accomplished Hammond B3 organ player, and performs regularly in the NY/NJ and Miami areas, as both a leader and a sideman. Tuesday, August 21, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersA Month With Christian McBrideJazz In The Movies: The 70s7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Join Grammy Award winner, jazz bassist/composer/bandleader and NJMH stalwart Christian McBride as he shares jazz written expressively for the movies during the Nixon/Ford/Carter era. These sessions are interactive, with lots of back and forth with the audience and Christian, who is famously charismatic and also very funny, and oh yes, one of the greatest musicians on the planet. His take on how Hollywood used jazz as a subject and as music is original and challenging. Please don’t miss this special series. We love it when Christian’s here, and you will too. Tuesday, August 21, 2012Spontaneous Combustion!Hosted by Jonathan Batiste9:30 – 10:30pmLocation: Rockwood Music Hall(196 Allen Street between E. Houston St. & Stanton St.)$10 Cover | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Jonathan Batiste recently kicked off the TED Conference to great acclaim (in the midst of his band’s European tour) and returns home to the NJMH and new York at a new venue: Rockwood Music Hall, where he will inaugurate Spontaneous Combustion!, featuring his band joined by young artists of all genres, some of which will be well known, and many of which you will be hearing about for the first time. All of Jonathan’s NJMH programs (including Jazz Is:Now!, which returns next month) are packed to the gills with curious people who share in an intensely personal experience. Make Tuesday nights your NJMH night this month, starting at the Visitors Center with Christian McBride, and then continuing the party with Jonathan downtown.  Thursday, August 23, 2012Harlem SpeaksRalph Peterson, Jr., Drummer6:30 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Master drummer, respected composer-bandleader and talent scout extrordinaire Ralph Peterson has carried on in the tradition of his mentor and idol Art Blakey, who was renowned for his hard-driving approach to the kit and his uncanny knack for discovering new talent. The list of jazz greats who passed through the ranks of Blakey’s Jazz Messengers reads like a Who’s Who in Jazz. Similarly, Peterson helped launch the careers of several promising young players in various bands over the years, including trumpeters Sean Jones and Jeremy Pelt, saxophonists Steve Wilson, Ralph Bowen and Tia Fuller, vibist Bryan Carrot and pianist Orrin Evans. Peterson emerged on the jazz scene in the mid ‘80s with Out of the Blue, a band of young lions put together by Blue Note Records. He subsequently worked through the ‘80s and ‘90s in bands led by Branford Marsalis, Roy Hargrove, Terence Blanchard, Jack Walrath, Steve Coleman, Stanley Cowell and Better Carter. Peterson is currently a full-professor at Berklee College of Music in Boston. Tuesday, August 28, 2012Jazz At Orchard BeachPapo Vasquez and the NJMH AllStars12:00pmLocation: The Orchard Beach Stage(Orchard Beach Pavilion, Pelham Bay Park, Bronx)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Tuesday, August 28, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersA Month With Christian McBrideJazz In The Movies: The “Modern” Era7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Join Grammy Award winner, jazz bassist/composer/bandleader and NJMH stalwart Christian McBride as he shares jazz written expressively for the movies in recent years. Hollywood made greater use of jazz composers than ever before, many of whom Christian has played with. These sessions are interactive, with lots of back and forth with the audience and Christian, who is famously charismatic and also very funny, and oh yes, one of the greatest musicians on the planet. His take on how Hollywood used jazz as a subject and as music is original and challenging. Please don’t miss this special series. We love it when Christian’s here, and you will too. Tuesday, August 28, 2012Spontaneous Combustion!Hosted by Jonathan Batiste9:30 – 10:30pmLocation: Rockwood Music Hall(196 Allen Street between E. Houston St. & Stanton St.)$10 Cover | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Jonathan Batiste recently kicked off the TED Conference to great acclaim (in the midst of his band’s European tour) and returns home to the NJMH and new York at a new venue: Rockwood Music Hall, where he will inaugurate Spontaneous Combustion!, featuring his band joined by young artists of all genres, some of which will be well known, and many of which you will be hearing about for the first time. All of Jonathan’s NJMH programs (including Jazz Is:Now!, which returns next month) are packed to the gills with curious people who share in an intensely personal experience. Make Tuesday nights your NJMH night this month, starting at the Visitors Center with Christian McBride, and then continuing the party with Jonathan downtown.

Tue, 08/21/2012 - 7:59 pm

This September, The National Jazz Museum in Harlem continues to offer a wide range of top quality free programming and affordable concerts from jazz’s most celebrated musicians, educators and historians.Harlem Speaks, our flagship public program of oral histories, will feature renowned pianist Roy Eaton and swing bandleader, George Gee.This month’s Jazz For Curious Listeners, presented with Berklee College of Music, will highlight the genius and legacy of Ray Charles.NJMH Associate Artistic Director Jonathan Batiste brings back the swing to the Museum with another run of his successful performance program, Jazz Is: Now!. The Jonathan Batiste Trio will also be featured at Harlem in the Himalayas, a collaborative performance with the Rubin Museum of Art.Saturday Panels will feature Ray Charles in Performance, highlighting exciting, live concert recordings in both audio and video.So, as you can see, it’s an action packed month for us, as usual. We hope to see you, your family and friends at as many of our events as you can make during this exciting month at The National Jazz Museum in Harlem. You’re bound to meet other similarly exciting, interesting and vital people – like yourselves! Tuesday, September 4, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersRay Charles: Genius & SoulThe Trio and Early Band YearsPresented with Berklee College of Music7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Ray Charles forged a unique blend of jazz, R&B, blues and his own unique sound into one of the most successful styles in the history of music. Join us for a close look and listen as we explore his first recordings, the significant influence of Nat King Cole, and his first breakout years with his thrilling little big band.Wednesday, September 5, 2012Jazz Is: Now! * note new locationHosted by Jonathan Batiste and the STAY HUMAN band7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126thFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Jazz Is: Now has evolved into a tremendously successful and totally original program headed by NJMH Associate Artistic Director Jonathan Batiste. Audience members participate throughout the evening, playing/singing/dancing/organizing the music (yes!), and having their endorphin levels raised at the same time. If this sounds too good to be true, then make sure you join us for this rousing celebration of the joy of music Tuesday, September 11, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersRay Charles: Genius & SoulLive!Presented with Berklee College of Music7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: Maysles Cinema(343 Lenox Avenue between 127th & 128th)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                              Ray Charles was one of the most original and dynamic entertainers of the last century. Naturally, his fame spread internationally through recordings, but those who experienced him live, in person, saw aspects of his genius that could be glimpsed by watching him. Join us for an electrifying evening of Ray Charles, LIVE! Rarities will include duets with Oscar Peterson, Barbra Streisand, Jackie Mason (!?!), B.B. King and others. Wednesday, September 12, 2012Jazz Is: Now! * note new locationHosted by Jonathan Batiste and the STAY HUMAN band7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126thFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Jazz Is: Now has evolved into a tremendously successful and totally original program headed by NJMH Associate Artistic Director Jonathan Batiste. Audience members participate throughout the evening, playing/singing/dancing/organizing the music (yes!), and having their endorphin levels raised at the same time. If this sounds too good to be true, then make sure you join us for this rousing celebration of the joy of music. Saturday, September 15, 2012Saturday PanelsRay Charles in Performance12:00 – 4:00pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 The studio recordings that made Ray Charles an international icon established his reputation, but experiencing his band LIVE, on stage, was a whole other experience. Join us for a celebration of what this superstar did in person, including rare performances at the Apollo Theater, the Newport Jazz festival and other classic venues. Tuesday, September 18, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersRay Charles: Soul Brothers Classic Recordings with Milt JacksonPresented with Berklee College of Music7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 In the late 1950’s, these two giants of soul collaborated on a series of classic recordings. This evening, we will examine the incredible music that jazz vibraphonist Milt Jackson and Ray Charles made together. And if you haven’t heard Milt play the guitar and Ray play the alto saxophone (he loved Charlie Parker), you’re in for a thrill. Wednesday, September 19, 2012Jazz Is: Now! * note new locationHosted by Jonathan Batiste and the STAY HUMAN band7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126thFREE | For more information: 212-348-830 Jazz Is: Now has evolved into a tremendously successful and totally original program headed by NJMH Associate Artistic Director Jonathan Batiste. Audience members participate throughout the evening, playing/singing/dancing/organizing the music (yes!), and having their endorphin levels raised at the same time. If this sounds too good to be true, then make sure you join us for this rousing celebration of the joy of music Thursday, September 20, 2012Harlem SpeaksRoy Eaton, Pianist6:30 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Roy Eaton, winner of the first Kosciuszko Foundation Chopin Award in June 1950, made his American debut with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra performing Chopin's F minor Concerto under George Schick in 1951. He was re-engaged to perform Beethoven's 4th concerto the following season, and also made his New York Town Hall debut in 1952. His career was "temporarily" interrupted by 2 years of service in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict, then approximately 30 years in advertising at Young & Rubicam, then as V.P. Music Director of Benton& Bowles, then running his own production company. He was recently inducted into the Advertising Hall of Fame for his Ad work. He is currently on the faculty of the Manhattan School of Music. In addition to Chopin, his performances of the music of Scott Joplin have been particularly noteworthy. Friday, September 21, 2012Harlem in the Himalayas                                                                         Jonathan Batiste Trio7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$20/Door $18/Advance | For more information: rmanyc.org Jonathan Batiste, the Associate Artistic Director of The National Jazz Museum in Harlem is an iconic artist, unique in this generation. With his voice on piano and dapper sense of style, he has ignited the NYC music scene. He is from a celebrated lineage of musicians. He has performed in over 40 countries, has appeared in Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Kennedy Center, Concertgebouw, has released several CD’s, among them “Times In New Orleans”, “Live In New York: At The Rubin Museum Of Art”, and “MY N.Y.”, and EP’s “The Amazing Jon Batiste EP” and “In The Night EP”. On T.V. he has been featured in the NBA All-Star Game Half-Time Show 2008, the HBO series “Treme”, and BET. He has collaborated with Wynton Marsalis, Prince, Jimmy Buffett, Harry Connick Jr., Roy Hargrove, Cassandra Wilson, The Gilt Groupe fashion line, and filmmaker Spike Lee among others. He is a “Movado Future Legend” award recipient and a “Steinway Performing Artist”. Tuesday, September 25, 2012Jazz for Curious ListenersRay Charles: Genius & SoulBig Band Classics with Quincy Jones and BasiePresented with Berklee College of Music7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Quincy Jones and Ray Charles met as unknown young men in Seattle in the late 1940’s, and within ten years both were well on their way to becoming international stars. Their 1961 collaboration, Genius and Soul, has long been recognized as one of the best jazz albums ever recorded. Backed by an all-star band comprised of Ellington and Basie veterans, the music exploded. Join us for a wonderful evening as we find out how and why it happened. Wednesday, September 26, 2012Jazz Is: Now! * note new locationHosted by Jonathan Batiste and the STAY HUMAN band7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126thFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Jazz Is: Now has evolved into a tremendously successful and totally original program headed by NJMH Associate Artistic Director Jonathan Batiste. Audience members participate throughout the evening, playing/singing/dancing/organizing the music (yes!), and having their endorphin levels raised at the same time. If this sounds too good to be true, then make sure you join us for this rousing celebration of the joy of music Thursday, September 27, 2012Harlem SpeaksGeorge Gee, Bandleader6:30 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 While he was a Freshman at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, George Gee launched his Make-Believe Ballroom program (named after the vintage Martin Block show) on the college radio station - and told everyone who’d listen about his dream of leading his own big band. In an era when punk, new wave and heavy metal ruled, some first thought that George was revisiting the past. Twenty-five years later, it is delightfully clear that George was just way ahead of his time! George also revels in his stature as a veritable Ambassador of Swing. George is a much sough-after authority on the evolution of the art. He has lectured at the New School University, led clinics and master classes - and is a popular source for newspaper, magazine, TV and Internet reports. George also served as a primary expert for the 2000 nationally broadcast BRAVO documentary "This Joint is Jumpin'’, featuring extensive interviews throughout the two-hour film. Still full of joy and energy, this diminutive gentleman of swing and his merry music makers are ready for new adventures in the next quarter-century!

Wed, 10/03/2012 - 7:00 pm

JAZZSTOCK will be presenting the music of Thelonious Monk in celebration of his birthday. This has become an annual event, but the first time it has been presented at the Bearsville Theater with the newly-formed Monk band:MELODIOUS THUNK!TIME: 7-11 pmGENERAL ADMISSION: $15STUDENTS (with ID): $5The band will play 7-10 pm and then we’ll open it up with a jam session honoring Monk’s tunes from 10 ‘til 11 pmLOCATION: THE BEARSVILLE THEATER, 291 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY 12498For reservations call 845-679-4406 or go to www.bearsvilletheater.comTeri and John recorded and co-produced their first CD, Misterioso, with Kenny Burrell on guitar and Jack DeJohnette on drums. The title song, Misterioso, is one of Monk’s most loved compositions, and has been changed to Listen To Your Soul, as a result of the Thelonious Monk family giving Teri permission to record her own lyrics to this jazz master's tune, an uncommon privilege.

Thu, 11/01/2012 - 1:27 pm

In less than six weeks, the City of Cape May will be the stage for the inaugural edition of the Exit 0 International Jazz Festival, November 9-11. More than 100 internationally known musicians will perform more than 50 shows over the course of the Festival, with performances taking place in intimate club venues and on the Main Stage of the Cape May Convention Hall during this three-day event.

Headlining the Festival on the Main Stage at Convention Hall will be The Sun Goddess Tour starring Jazz legend and three-time Grammy Award Winner RAMSEY LEWIS AND HIS ELECTRIC BAND on Saturday at 7:30 PM and 9:30PM.  Opening the Festival on Friday at 8:00 PM and 10:15PM will be Philadelphia native son and Grammy award winning jazz bassist, Christian McBride and his quintet - Inside Straight.  And a very special and rare jazz session will take place on Saturday afternoon at noon when Chilean vocalist Claudia Acuna performs with her quartet followed by the 17-man strong Captain Black Big Band, led by jazz pianist Orrin Evans and featuring Nicholas Payton.
 
Club venues up and down Beach Avenue in Cape May will provide intimate settings throughout the three-day festival include: Boiler Room @ Congress Hall, CARNEY’S, Carney’s Other Room, Martini Beach, Sea Salt @ Ocean Club and Aleathea’s @ Inn of Cape May. Performing in the clubs will be world class artists like Nicholas Payton, Mark Murphy, Bobby Broom Deep Blue Organ Trio, the Pedrito Martinez Group, Henry Cole & Afrobeat Collective, Ben Williams & Sound Effect, The Stooges Brass Band, Antonio Sanchez Migration, Joe Krown Organ Trio, Marcus Strickland, and more.
 
Jazz is no stranger to the City of Cape May with a previous festival having run for 17 years. The November edition of the Exit 0 International Jazz Festival is the inaugural event of a planned series of festivals to take place bi-annually in the Nation’s Oldest Seaside Resort. Spy Boy Productions, producer of the Festival, is committed to bringing a world-class festival to Cape May, which is ideally situated on the east coast with easy access to all major cities. “Music has such a great capacity to bring people together, and the festivals that resonate with their audience seem to be able to bring out what is best in both the audience and the musicians,” stated Michael Kline, President of Spy Boy Productions.

Mon, 11/05/2012 - 2:17 pm

This November, The National Jazz Museum in Harlem continues to offer a wide range of top quality free programming and affordable concerts from jazz’s most celebrated musicians, educators and historians.

First and foremost, please join us for and/or support our benefit concert on November 8th – see details below.

Harlem Speaks, our flagship public program of oral histories, offers in depth conversation with two master saxophonist/composer/educators, Bill Kirchner and Ted Nash.

This month’s Jazz For Curious Listeners focuses on HBO’s acclaimed series Treme. As we have in past years, the sessions will be hosted by noted journalist Larry Blumenfeld, who has spent extended time in New Orleans and written about it at length in the Wall Street Journal.

Saturday Panels will feature an afternoon of New Orleans jazz and talk – this will be a joyous way to spend a weekend afternoon.

Jazz at the Players returns with another elegant, chamber jazz concert; saxophone giant Wayne Escoffery is bringing an all-star quartet to play in the intimate, acoustically perfect setting of this Gramercy Park club.

And Jonathan Batiste, just back from a successful two week engagement in Doha, Qatar, returns with his sell-out series Jazz Is:NOW!. If you haven’t been to one these session yet, run, don’t walk!

So, as you can see, it’s an action packed month for us, as usual. We hope to see you, your family and friends at as many of our events as you can make during this exciting month at The National Jazz Museum in Harlem. You’re bound to meet other similarly exciting, interesting and vital people – like yourselves!

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Tuesday, November 6, 2012
 
Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning into Treme
Bands on the Run
7:00 – 8:30pm   
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
 
With Larry Blumenfeld, The Wall Street Journal
In Sidney Bechet's memoir, “Treat It Gentle,” the late, great clarinetist's real grandfather is supplanted by Omar, a fictional figure based on a folk tale, all the better to convey stirring truths about the true origins of New Orleans jazz. Real and imagined intermingle pointedly in New Orleans, in all walks of life. Set in New Orleans, David Simon’s fictional HBO series “Treme,” now in its third season, picked up three months after the floods that resulted from the levee failures after Hurricane Katrina. Culture, which in New Orleans means a tight braid of music, cuisine, dance, visual art, and street life, is the primary focus of the series, as indeed it was and is the defining element of the city’s recovery and renewed identity.
These 90-minute conversations, led by writer Larry Blumenfeld, who has written extensively about New Orleans since the flood, will use the third season of the HBO series to frame a wide-ranging consideration of jazz culture in New Orleans and its role in continued recovery.  Excerpts from the show will be screened, and special guests—musicians, participants in the series, and scholars—will join in the discussion.

Bands on the Run: Season 3 opened with a riveting scene of musicians getting arrested at a memorial procession in the street, based on an actual 2007 incident. We'll look at the historic tension between the city and its indigenous culture, how it has recently bubbled up in clubs, on Facebook, and in city council chambers, and how it affects the cultural life of New Orleans residents and the careers of musicians.

Blumenfeld writes about music and culture for The Wall Street Journal, Village Voice and many other publications, is editor-at-large of Jazziz magazine, and blogs at: http://blogs.artinfo.com/blunotes/ He is a former Katrina Media Fellow with the Open Society Institute, researching cultural recovery in New Orleans, and the winner of the 2012 Jazz Journalists Association Helen Dance-Robert Palmer Award for Writing.
 
Thursday, November 8, 2012
 
Christian McBride & Jonathan Batiste Together in Concert
A Benefit Concert for The National Jazz Museum in Harlem
6:30pm Reception, 7:30pm Concert
Location: El Teatro at El Museo del Barrio (1230 Fifth Avenue at 104th Street)
$100 for Orchestra Seating for the Concert Only
$150 for Preferred Seating and Admission to a Pre-Concert Reception with the Artists
$250 for Prime Seating, Admission to the Pre-Concert Reception with the Artists and a one-year NJMH Membership
$40 Student Tickets (with Student ID) for Balcony Seats
For more information: 212-348-8300 | http://jazzmuseuminharlem.org/evite/
Please come and support the hundreds of events that the NJMH provides free of charge every year.
 
 
Tuesday, November 13, 2012
 
Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning into Treme
Treme at 200
Guest Davis Rogan
7:00 – 8:30pm   
Location: Maysles Cinema
(343 Lenox Ave.)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
With Larry Blumenfeld, The Wall Street Journal

In Sidney Bechet's memoir, “Treat It Gentle,” the late, great clarinetist's real grandfather is supplanted by Omar, a fictional figure based on a folk tale, all the better to convey stirring truths about the true origins of New Orleans jazz. Real and imagined intermingle pointedly in New Orleans, in all walks of life. Set in New Orleans, David Simon’s fictional HBO series “Treme,” now in its third season, picked up three months after the floods that resulted from the levee failures after Hurricane Katrina. Culture, which in New Orleans means a tight braid of music, cuisine, dance, visual art, and street life, is the primary focus of the series, as indeed it was and is the defining element of the city’s recovery and renewed identity. 
These 90-minute conversations, led by writer Larry Blumenfeld, who has written extensively about New Orleans since the flood, will use the third season of the HBO series to frame a wide-ranging consideration of jazz culture in New Orleans and its role in continued recovery.  Excerpts from the show will be screened, and special guests—musicians, participants in the series, and scholars—will join in the discussion.
Tremé at 200: October marked the bicentennial of Tremé, the New Orleans neighborhood from which Simon’s series derives its name and among this country’s oldest African American urban communities. Guest Davis Rogan (the basis for Treme’s Davis McAlary, and a Tremé resident) will help consider both legacy and current events in Tremé.
Larry Blumenfeld writes about music and culture for The Wall Street Journal, Village Voice and many other publications, is editor-at-large of Jazziz magazine, and blogs at: http://blogs.artinfo.com/blunotes/ He is a former Katrina Media Fellow with the Open Society Institute, researching cultural recovery in New Orleans, and the winner of the 2012 Jazz Journalists Association Helen Dance-Robert Palmer Award for Writing.
 
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
Jazz at The Players
7:00pm
Location: The Players
(16 Gramercy Park South)
$20 | For more information: 212-475-6116
Wayne Escoffery - Tenor and Soprano Saxophones
Danny Grissett - Piano
Ugonna Okegwo - Bass
Mike Clark – Drums
 
Since moving to New York City in 2000, Grammy Award winning tenor saxophonist Wayne Escoffery has become one of the Jazz world's most talented rising stars and in-demand sidemen. At only 37 he has recorded seven CDs as a leader and been on numerous recordings as a sideman. Wayne began his professional New York career touring and recording with The Eric Reed Septet. In 2001 he became a steady member of the Mingus Big Band/Orchestra/Dynasty, The Lonnie Plaxico Group, and Abdulah Ibrahim's Akaya. Then in 2004 Grammy award winning producer, arranger and trumpeter Don Sickler asked Wayne to be a part of Ben Riley's Monk legacy Septet (an innovative piano-less group dedicated to carrying on the legacy of jazz great Thelonious Monk).

At this time Wayne was also touring with Jazz At Lincoln Center's Music of the Masters consisting of two groups of musicians hand picked by Wynton Marsalis.
In 2006 Wayne secured one of the most coveted gigs in jazz: a frontline position in Tom Harrell's working quintet. In addition to being a part of some of the last true "apprenticeship" opportunities of our era, he has delivered six studio dates as a leader.  His first CD for Savant called Veneration (released in March of 2007) was recorded live at Smoke Jazz Club in NYC and features Joe Locke on vibes, Hans Glawichnig on bass, and Lewis Nash on drums. His most recent recording "The Only Son of One" on Sunnyside Records is Escoffery's first recording of all original music and features his new two keyboard quintet with pianist Orrin Evans, Miles Davis veteran keyboardist Adam Holzman, bassist Hans Glawischnig and drummer Jason Brown.

Despite his musical talent Wayne (born on February 23rd 1975 in London, England) grew up in a relatively non-musical household. In 1983, he and his mother moved to the United States eventually settling in New Haven, Connecticut in 1986. Wayne always enjoyed singing whatever music he heard but it wasn't until his relocation to New Haven that his formal music education began. At age eleven Wayne joined The New Haven Trinity Boys Choir, an internationally known Boys Choir that toured and recorded annually. At this time he also began taking private saxophone lessons and playing the tenor saxophone in school bands.

(Jackie) McLean gave Wayne a full scholarship to attend The Hartt School, where he graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor's degree in Jazz Performance, and became known as one of McLean's prize pupils. McLean gave Wayne a full scholarship to attend The Hartt School, where he graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor's degree in Jazz Performance, and became known as one of McLean's prize pupils. While at Hartt, Wayne played with such jazz greats as Curtis Fuller, Eddie Henderson. By the time he was sixteen he left the Choir and began a more intensive study of the saxophone, attending The Jazz Mobile in New York City, The Neighborhood Music School and The Educational Center for the Arts, both in New Haven. During his senior year in high School, he attended the Artist's Collective in Hartford, Ct. It was there that he met Jackie McLean, the world-renowned alto saxophonist and founder of both The Artist's Collective and the jazz program at The Hartt School.

In May 1999, Wayne graduated with a Masters degree from The New England Conservatory moving to NYC in 2000. Since then, he has performed with countless internationally respected musicians and has become known for his beautiful sound, impressive technique and versatility. J. Robert Bragonier of All About Jazz Magazine writes, "This is a talented youngster capable of long, flowing lines, noteworthy creativity, and a broad range of expressiveness." When commenting on Jackie McLean's influence on Escoffery, he writes ..."the latter's influence is apparent in his knowledge of jazz history, lean, angular harmonies, and muscular tone." As well as performing with his new quintet, Wayne Escoffery currently performs locally and tours internationally with Ben Riley's Quartet, The Mingus Big Band/Orchestra/Dynasty, Ron Carter's Great Big Band vocalist Carolyn Leonhart, and The Tom Harrell Quintet where he also acts as co-producer having co-produced Harrell's last four releases: Prana Dance, Roman Nights, The Time of the Sun and No. 5. The vast array of contributions Wayne has made to the Jazz world in such a short time leads seasoned industry professionals like Niel Tesser to write "Pay special attention to tenor man Wayne Escoffery, whose rapid development - from album to album (and seemingly solo to solo) - has given us a jazz hero for the coming decade.”
 
 
Thursday, November 15, 2012
 
Harlem Speaks
Ted Nash, Saxophonist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
 
Grammy-nominated artist Ted Nash enjoys an extraordinary career as a performer, conductor, composer, arranger, and educator.  Born in Los Angeles, multi-instrumentalist Nash's interest in music started at an early age. He was exposed to music and encouraged by his father, trombonist Dick Nash, and uncle, reedman Ted Nash - both well-known studio and jazz musicians. Nash blossomed early, a “young lion” before the term became marketing vernacular.  One of Nash's most important associations is with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis, as well as the adventurous Jazz Composers Collective.  Nash's recordings have appeared on many national "best-of" lists including The New Yorker, The New York Times, Village Voice, The Boston Globe, and New York Newsday.  
 
Saturday, November 17, 2012
 
Saturday Panels
Hearing Treme A New Orleans Jam
12:00 – 4:00pm   
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                

Come join us for an afternoon filled will music and reminiscence about the treasure that is New Orleans. Look for details in our weekly updates and on our website.
 
Tuesday, November 20, 2012
 
Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning into Treme
In The Tradition?
7:00 – 8:30pm   
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
With Larry Blumenfeld, The Wall Street Journal

In Sidney Bechet's memoir, “Treat It Gentle,” the late, great clarinetist's real grandfather is supplanted by Omar, a fictional figure based on a folk tale, all the better to convey stirring truths about the true origins of New Orleans jazz. Real and imagined intermingle pointedly in New Orleans, in all walks of life. Set in New Orleans, David Simon’s fictional HBO series “Treme,” now in its third season, picked up three months after the floods that resulted from the levee failures after Hurricane Katrina. Culture, which in New Orleans means a tight braid of music, cuisine, dance, visual art, and street life, is the primary focus of the series, as indeed it was and is the defining element of the city’s recovery and renewed identity.
These 90-minute conversations, led by writer Larry Blumenfeld, who has written extensively about New Orleans since the flood, will use the third season of the HBO series to frame a wide-ranging consideration of jazz culture in New Orleans and its role in continued recovery.  Excerpts from the show will be screened, and special guests—musicians, participants in the series, and scholars—will join in the discussion.

In The Tradition? New Orleans is a city in which traditional and modern jazz do not easily intermingle. This tension is explored in the storylines of a few Treme characters, most notably trumpeter Delmond Lambreaux and trombonist Antoine Batiste.

Larry Blumenfeld writes about music and culture for The Wall Street Journal, Village Voice and many other publications, is editor-at-large of Jazziz magazine, and blogs at: http://blogs.artinfo.com/blunotes/ He is a former Katrina Media Fellow with the Open Society Institute, researching cultural recovery in New Orleans, and the winner of the 2012 Jazz Journalists Association Helen Dance-Robert Palmer Award for Writing.
 
Tuesday, November 27, 2012
 
Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning into Treme
Do You Know What It Means?
7:00 – 8:30pm   
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
With Larry Blumenfeld, The Wall Street Journal

In Sidney Bechet's memoir, “Treat It Gentle,” the late, great clarinetist's real grandfather is supplanted by Omar, a fictional figure based on a folk tale, all the better to convey stirring truths about the true origins of New Orleans jazz. Real and imagined intermingle pointedly in New Orleans, in all walks of life. Set in New Orleans, David Simon’s fictional HBO series “Treme,” now in its third season, picked up three months after the floods that resulted from the levee failures after Hurricane Katrina. Culture, which in New Orleans means a tight braid of music, cuisine, dance, visual art, and street life, is the primary focus of the series, as indeed it was and is the defining element of the city’s recovery and renewed identity.
These 90-minute conversations, led by writer Larry Blumenfeld, who has written extensively about New Orleans since the flood, will use the third season of the HBO series to frame a wide-ranging consideration of jazz culture in New Orleans and its role in continued recovery.  Excerpts from the show will be screened, and special guests—musicians, participants in the series, and scholars—will join in the discussion.

Do You Know What It Means? What will New Orleans sound like, look like, and stand for in the future? What has it meant in the past? We’ll look at how the characters envision a “new” New Orleans in the HBO series and how that identity is playing out in real life.
Larry Blumenfeld writes about music and culture for The Wall Street Journal, Village Voice and many other publications, is editor-at-large of Jazziz magazine, and blogs at: http://blogs.artinfo.com/blunotes/ He is a former Katrina Media Fellow with the Open Society Institute, researching cultural recovery in New Orleans, and the winner of the 2012 Jazz Journalists Association Helen Dance-Robert Palmer Award for Writing.
 
Wednesday, November 28, 2012
 
Jazz Is: Now! * note new location
Hosted by Jonathan Batiste and the STAY HUMAN band
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,
NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126th
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                
Jazz Is: Now has evolved into a tremendously successful and totally original program headed by NJMH Associate Artistic Director Jonathan Batiste. Audience members participate throughout the evening, playing/singing/dancing/organizing the music (yes!), and having their endorphin levels raised at the same time. If this sounds too good to be true, then make sure you join us for this rousing celebration of the joy of music.
 
Thursday, November 29, 2012
 
Harlem Speaks
Bill Kirchner, Saxophonist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
 
Bill Kirchner is an award-winning saxophonist, composer-arranger, bandleader, record and radio producer, jazz historian, and educator. His jazz ensemble, the Bill Kirchner Nonet, has appeared at major festivals, concerts, and nightclubs since 1980. His latest CDs (on A-Records) are Trance Dance with the Nonet and Some Enchanted Evening, a collection of duets with pianists Michael Abene, Marc Copland, and Harold Danko. The Nonet also has recorded two albums for Sea Breeze Records:What It Is To Be Frank and Infant Eyes. For over a decade, Kirchner has been closely involved with jazz Recordings—as a producer and liner-notes annotator—for Blue Note, BMG, Challenge, Columbia, Denon/Savoy, Fantasy, GRP, Mosaic, the Smithsonian Collection of Recordings, Verve, and Warner Bros. He received a 1995 NAIRD Indie award for “Best Liner Notes” for the Smithsonian’s Big Band Renaissance: The Evolution of the Jazz Orchestra and a 1996 Grammy for “Best Album Notes” for Miles Davis and Gil Evans: The Complete Columbia Studio Recordings. He teaches advanced jazz composition, jazz history, and score analysis at the New School University in New York City. He also teaches graduate courses at New Jersey City University and a Duke Ellington course at Manhattan School of Music.

Tue, 11/13/2012 - 3:01 pm

The Louis Armstrong House Museum Gala will be held on Tuesday, December 4, 2012 at the Manhattan Penthouse, 80
Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10011. The cocktail hour begins at 6:00 pm; dinner and the awards ceremony follow at 7:15 pm featuring a special performance by David Ostwald’s Louis Armstrong Centennial Band. Business attire is welcome.The Gala Celebration honors Stanley Crouch, distinguished author and President of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation; Jimmy Heath, saxophonist, composer, arranger, and Queens College Professor Emeritus; and George Wein, legendary jazz impresario and Chairman of the Newport Festivals Foundation, for their pioneering work to preserve and promote the cultural legacy of Louis Armstrong. Stanley Crouch is an awarding-winning writer and co-founder of Jazz at Lincoln Center. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. has written about Mr. Crouch: "Each generation has a moment, or an embodiment, of hard-earned integrity and the keenest insight. Among our generation of writers, Stanley Crouch is that moment."  Crouch’s writings on Louis Armstrong are considered some of the finest in the literature of music.  He serves on the Board of Trustees of the Museum. Jimmy Heath was named an NEA Jazz Master, Jazz’s highest honor, in 2003 for   his monumental contributions to Jazz as a saxophonist, composer, and arranger.  He founded the graduate program in Jazz Studies at Queens College in 1987 and retired in 1998 as Professor Emeritus.  He was an early advocate for the establishment of the Louis Armstrong House Museum and a charter member of the Museum’s Advisory Board.George Wein, legendary producer, promoter, founder of the Newport Jazz Festival, and Chairman of the Newport Festivals Foundation, invented the concept of the jazz festival.  In recognition of the thousands of jazz performances that he produced, he was named an NEA Jazz Master in 2005.  He has been called "the most famous jazz impresario" and "the most important non-player... in jazz history."  A decades-long Armstrong fan, he produced some of Armstrong’s most notable concerts and is a member of the Museum’s Advisory Board.Michael Cogswell, the Museum’s Director, recalled that, “I’ve attended many galas over the years, but the Louis Armstrong House Museum’s inaugural gala in 2011 was the first gala I have seen at which, at the end of the evening, no one wanted to leave!  The music was so gorgeous and the vibe was so welcoming, that all the guests continued to hang out.  I hope for the same this year.”The Louis Armstrong House Museum is the modest home of Louis and Lucille Armstrong in Corona, Queens.  The Museum’s programs feature house tours, jazz concerts, educational events and community outreach. It is a National Historic Landmark and New York City Landmark; and what was once a stack of 72 shipping cartons of “Satchmo’s stuff” has grown to become the largest research archives in the world for any jazz musician.

Tue, 11/27/2012 - 1:24 pm

The Louis Armstrong House Museum is offering special guided Historic Holiday House Tours beginning December 4th through December 30th with regular museum admission. These house tours will feature rare audio clips from Louis's personal recordings of himself and family celebrations at home including an at-home reading of "Twas the Night Before Christmas, A Visit from St. Nicholas.''  The tours will also feature seasonal recordings including: “Zat You Santa Claus” and Louis listening to Nat King Cole sing “All I Want for Christmas is My Two Front Teeth” with an impromptu duet by Louis himself.In keeping with Louis and Lucille's tradition, the house will be brightly decorated for the holidays.  Free candy canes are included with museum admission.“We love recreating the holiday joy of Louis and Lucille's home at Christmas time.  It’s a great place to bring your friends and family and to take a break from the hustle and bustle that December often brings,” says Michael Cogswell, Director of the Louis Armstrong House Museum.The Historic Holiday House Tour is a 40-minute, guided interpretive tour of the only preserved home of a jazz legend in the world. Louis Armstrong House is a National Historic landmark and New York City landmark. Trained docents lead the Historic House Tours.  All of the furnishings are original giving the feeling that Louis and Lucille just stepped out for a minute since no one has lived in the house since Louis and Lucille Armstrong.The Louis Armstrong House Museum Store is the perfect destination for unique holiday gifts to jazz up the holiday season.  One treasure is the Louis Armstrong Ambassador Series CDs from Sweden, which contain rare and previously unreleased recordings. The Ambassador CDs feature Louis Armstrong on the radio, Louis live at Carnegie Hall, Louis with Benny Goodman's sextet, Louis jamming with Fats Waller and much more. The Museum is the world’s exclusive distributor of Ambassador CDs -- they are not sold in any other store or online.The Museum Store’s CD collection also includes: Satchmo at Symphony Hall 65th Anniversary: The Complete Performances, a legendary concert issued in complete form for the very first time thanks to the Museum’s Gösta Hägglöf Collection, and Louis Armstrong - The OKeh, Columbia and RCA Victor Recordings 1925-1933, a 10-CD set featuring Armstrong's most famous early recordings in one box.The Museum Store features many one-of-a-kind gifts including Armstrong T-shirts, caps, tote bags, and a “West End Blues” Frisbee that looks like a 78-record.  Books, children’s books, CDs, and DVDs provide one-stop shopping for “everything Armstrong.”  Foodies will be delighted to learn that the Museum is the northeast’s exclusive distributor of “Jazzmen Rice” (an aromatic jasmine rice grown in Louisiana), which displays a picture of Armstrong on the front of the bag.The Louis Armstrong House Museum is located at 34-56 107th Street in Corona, New York. The Museum is open Tuesday – Friday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm and Saturday/Sunday from 12:00 noon – 5:00 pm.  No reservations are necessary for individuals but groups of 8 or more should call 718.478.8274 or visit www.louisarmstronghouse.org to make a reservation.Parking is available within the neighborhood and the Museum is accessible by subway via the 7 Train.Admission is $10.00, $7.00 for seniors, students and children and free LAHM members and children under 4. Groups with reservations enjoy a discount on admission. The Louis Armstrong House Museum is closed on all Mondays and the following Holidays: Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day.  It is always open on the 4th of July, in honor of Louis’s traditional birthday.Thanks to the vision and funding of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, the Louis Armstrong House Museum welcomes visitors from all over the world, six days per week, 52 weeks per year.

Tue, 12/04/2012 - 7:59 am

This December, The National Jazz Museum in Harlem continues to offer a wide range of top quality free programming and affordable concerts from jazz’s most celebrated musicians, educators and historians.

Harlem Speaks, our flagship public program of oral histories, offers in depth conversation with two pianists from different places and generations, but who both found an individual voice: Richard Wyands and Jean-Michel Pilc.

This month’s Jazz For Curious Listeners examines the museum’s world-renowned Savory Collection, a treasure trove of classic jazz recorded in the 1930’s that was never heard for over 70 years. We’ll hear Ellington, Basie, Holiday, Goodman, Hawkins, Waller and many more in sounds that can only be heard presently at our home.

Saturday Panels will feature 2012 jams on highlights from the Savory Collection, as well as a panel of jazz musicians listening to and reacting to the classic recordings for the first time.

Jazz Is: Now! has become the museum’s most popular program – hosted by Jonathan Batiste and is Stay Human band, it’s a must for people who want to feel the live buzz and electricity of jazz in the moment.

So, as you can see, it’s an action packed month for us, as usual. We hope to see you, your family and friends at as many of our events as you can make during this exciting month at The National Jazz Museum in Harlem. You’re bound to meet other similarly exciting, interesting and vital people – like yourselves!
 
Tuesday, December 4, 2012
 
Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Savory Collection: An Update
Basie/Ellington+: The Big Bands
7:00 – 8:30pm    
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
 
The sounds of the big bands is an essential element in the story of America. Join us for music you have never heard before from Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Bob Crosby, Tommy Dorsey and others.
In 2010, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem made headlines across the country with the acquisition of the legendary Savory Collection, an extraordinary archive of live musical recordings from the Swing Era.  Recorded between 1935 and 1941 by audio engineer and jazz enthusiast William Savory, the Savory Collection features never-before-heard live recordings of jazz legends at the height of their careers, including Billie Holiday, Fats Waller, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, and Louis Armstrong.  The Savory Collection expands the Museum’s archives of jazz artifacts, ephemera and recordings, which include its extensive Duke Ellington and Ralph Ellison collections.  The Jazz Museum makes these holdings available to the general public through its jazz library, exhibitions, live performances, audio research stations, artist talks, workshops, and youth education programs. 
 
With support from the Grammy Foundation, the New York Community Trust and other funders, the Jazz Museum has completed the first phase of a project to preserve these important recordings by transferring them to CD or DVD format.  The digitization process has been completed to high standards, assuring that these recordings are no longer at risk but will be accessible in perpetuity.  As we move forward, the next phases of this project will focus on working to restore these recordings to even higher audio standards; completing the discography to ensure the thoroughness and accuracy of the documentation for each recording; and making the recordings broadly available to the jazz scholars and aficionados who are eager to hear them – and to study, analyze and contextualize what they reveal about the jazz artists, music and culture of a historic era.
 
Thursday, December 6, 2012
 
Harlem Speaks
Richard Wyands, Pianist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
 
Richard Wyands made his first recordings in 1946, and three years later recorded with Charles Mingus. Over the intervening six decades he has remained at the top of his game, playing with elegance with many of the greatest musicians in the world. Wyands started working in local clubs when he was 16, graduated from San Francisco State College, and gained experience playing in the San Francisco Bay area. Wyands, who was a sideman on a few early dates for Fantasy, spent time accompanying Ella Fitzgerald (1956) and Carmen McRae. He moved to New York in 1958, where he played with Roy Haynes, Charles Mingus (1959), Gigi Gryce's quintet, Oliver Nelson, Etta Jones, Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, and Gene Ammons, among others.Wyands was associated with Kenny Burrell, with whom he toured extensively during 1964-1977, and has played with many other top musicians, including Freddie Hubbard, Zoot Sims, Frank Foster, the Illinois Jacquet Big Band, Benny Carter, Ernie Andrews, and Milt Hinton, among others. Richard Wyands has also headed his own trios, but has only had a handful of sessions as a leader thus far, including a 1978 date for Storyville and sessions for DIW (1992) and Criss Cross (1995). Join us for a rare night hearing from a jazz veteran whose story will fascinate you.
 
 
Tuesday, December 11, 2012
 
Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Savory Collection: An Update
Jam Sessions with Lester Young and Friends
7:00 – 8:30pm   
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
 
Among the treasures of the Savory Collection are studio jam sessions that include Lester Young, Benny Goodman, Eddie Condon, Bobby Hackett, Charlie Shavers, Bunny Berigan, Chu Berry and many others. You can hear them during this rare opportunity to sample music unheard for several decades.
 
In 2010, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem made headlines across the country with the acquisition of the legendary Savory Collection, an extraordinary archive of live musical recordings from the Swing Era.  Recorded between 1935 and 1941 by audio engineer and jazz enthusiast William Savory, the Savory Collection features never-before-heard live recordings of jazz legends at the height of their careers, including Billie Holiday, Fats Waller, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, and Louis Armstrong.  The Savory Collection expands the Museum’s archives of jazz artifacts, ephemera and recordings, which include its extensive Duke Ellington and Ralph Ellison collections.  The Jazz Museum makes these holdings available to the general public through its jazz library, exhibitions, live performances, audio research stations, artist talks, workshops, and youth education programs. 
 
With support from the Grammy Foundation, the New York Community Trust and other funders, the Jazz Museum has completed the first phase of a project to preserve these important recordings by transferring them to CD or DVD format.  The digitization process has been completed to high standards, assuring that these recordings are no longer at risk but will be accessible in perpetuity.  As we move forward, the next phases of this project will focus on working to restore these recordings to even higher audio standards; completing the discography to ensure the thoroughness and accuracy of the documentation for each recording; and making the recordings broadly available to the jazz scholars and aficionados who are eager to hear them – and to study, analyze and contextualize what they reveal about the jazz artists, music and culture of a historic era.
 
Wednesday, December 12, 2012
 
Jazz Is: Now! * note new location
Hosted by Jonathan Batiste and the STAY HUMAN band
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,
NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126th
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                
Jazz Is: Now has evolved into a tremendously successful and totally original program headed by NJMH Associate Artistic Director Jonathan Batiste. Audience members participate throughout the evening, playing/singing/dancing/organizing the music (yes!), and having their endorphin levels raised at the same time. If this sounds too good to be true, then make sure you join us for this rousing celebration of the joy of music.
 
 
Thursday, December 13, 2012
 
Harlem Speaks
Jean-Michel Pilc, Pianist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Born in 1960 in Paris, and now an American citizen, self-taught Jean-Michel Pilc has performed with numerous giants in the music field such as: Roy Haynes, Michael Brecker, Dave Liebman, Jean Toussaint, Rick Margitza, Martial Solal, Michel Portal, Daniel Humair, Marcus Miller, Kenny Garrett, Lenny White, Chris Potter, John Abercrombie, Mingus Dynasty & Big Band, Lew Soloff and Richard Bona. He has also worked with Harry Belafonte, as his musical director and pianist. Jean-Michel Pilc moved to New York City in 1995. There, he formed a trio with François Moutin (bass) and Ari Hoenig (drums). They recorded a one-week engagement at the legendary jazz club Sweet Basil and, in 2000, released two CDs: Jean-Michel Pilc Trio - Together - Live at Sweet Basil, NYC - Vol. 1 & 2 (A- Records). In 2004, Jean- Michel released his first solo album, Follow Me (Dreyfus). Jean-Michel Pilc then went back to trio format to record Live at Iridium, NYC, in 2004, New Dreams in 2006,and True Story in 2009, all three for Dreyfus Jazz. Since 2006, Pilc has  been a NYU Steinhardt faculty member. There, he is giving private lessons (piano and other instruments), ensemble classes and improvisation workshops. He was also co-director of NYU Summer Jazz Improv Workshop in 2010. Jean-Michel is also teaching for the New School in NYC, as well as privately. Pilc is also currently working on a pedagogical book and on educational videos about jazz, improvisation and piano playing. Join us for a special evening of conversation with a unique artist.
 
 
Saturday, December 15, 2012
 
Saturday Panels
Savory Jam Contemporary reactions to the glories of the Savory Collection
12:00 – 4:00pm   
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                
 
A rare chance to hear musicians listen to, comment on, and play creative new music based on the treasures of the Savory Collection.
 
In 2010, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem made headlines across the country with the acquisition of the legendary Savory Collection, an extraordinary archive of live musical recordings from the Swing Era.  Recorded between 1935 and 1941 by audio engineer and jazz enthusiast William Savory, the Savory Collection features never-before-heard live recordings of jazz legends at the height of their careers, including Billie Holiday, Fats Waller, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, and Louis Armstrong.  The Savory Collection expands the Museum’s archives of jazz artifacts, ephemera and recordings, which include its extensive Duke Ellington and Ralph Ellison collections.  The Jazz Museum makes these holdings available to the general public through its jazz library, exhibitions, live performances, audio research stations, artist talks, workshops, and youth education programs. 
 
With support from the Grammy Foundation, the New York Community Trust and other funders, the Jazz Museum has completed the first phase of a project to preserve these important recordings by transferring them to CD or DVD format.  The digitization process has been completed to high standards, assuring that these recordings are no longer at risk but will be accessible in perpetuity.  As we move forward, the next phases of this project will focus on working to restore these recordings to even higher audio standards; completing the discography to ensure the thoroughness and accuracy of the documentation for each recording; and making the recordings broadly available to the jazz scholars and aficionados who are eager to hear them – and to study, analyze and contextualize what they reveal about the jazz artists, music and culture of a historic era.
 
 
Tuesday, December 18, 2012
 
Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Savory Collection: An Update
Odds and Ends: Louis Jordan+
7:00 – 8:30pm   
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
 
Some of the items in the Savory Collection don’t fall into easy categories – like the very first broadcasts of the little known Louis Jordan band broadcasting from Harlem, or out takes of Dinah Shore, or an all night jam session with the pianist Joe Sullivan. You’ll hear them tonight!
 
In 2010, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem made headlines across the country with the acquisition of the legendary Savory Collection, an extraordinary archive of live musical recordings from the Swing Era.  Recorded between 1935 and 1941 by audio engineer and jazz enthusiast William Savory, the Savory Collection features never-before-heard live recordings of jazz legends at the height of their careers, including Billie Holiday, Fats Waller, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, and Louis Armstrong.  The Savory Collection expands the Museum’s archives of jazz artifacts, ephemera and recordings, which include its extensive Duke Ellington and Ralph Ellison collections.  The Jazz Museum makes these holdings available to the general public through its jazz library, exhibitions, live performances, audio research stations, artist talks, workshops, and youth education programs. 
 
With support from the Grammy Foundation, the New York Community Trust and other funders, the Jazz Museum has completed the first phase of a project to preserve these important recordings by transferring them to CD or DVD format.  The digitization process has been completed to high standards, assuring that these recordings are no longer at risk but will be accessible in perpetuity.  As we move forward, the next phases of this project will focus on working to restore these recordings to even higher audio standards; completing the discography to ensure the thoroughness and accuracy of the documentation for each recording; and making the recordings broadly available to the jazz scholars and aficionados who are eager to hear them – and to study, analyze and contextualize what they reveal about the jazz artists, music and culture of a historic era.

Thu, 12/20/2012 - 8:34 am

On Tuesday, Dec. 4th the Manhattan Penthouse was swinging as Louis Armstrong lovers from around the world gathered to celebrate Armstrong’s legacy and raise funds for the Louis Armstrong House Museum.The Museum honored Stanley Crouch, distinguished author and President of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation; Jimmy Heath, saxophonist, composer, arranger, and Queens College Professor Emeritus; and George Wein, legendary jazz impresario and Chairman of the Newport Festivals Foundation, for their pioneering work to preserve and promote the cultural legacy of Louis Armstrong. Each honoree received a “Louie” award.  The great Wynton Marsalis surprised the crowd joining the festivities to introduce Stanley Crouch.After the awards ceremony, David Ostwald’s Louis Armstrong Centennial Band gave a performance that had the crowd cheering. Jimmy Heath sat-in on soprano saxophone and performed “What a Wonderful World.”The Louis Armstrong House Museum is the perfectly preserved home of Louis and Lucille Armstrong in Corona, Queens.  The Museum’s programs feature house tours, jazz concerts, educational events and community outreach. It is a National Historic Landmark and New York City Landmark; and what was once a stack of 72 shipping cartons of “Satchmo’s stuff” has grown to become the largest research archives in the world for any jazz musician.More information about the Louis Armstrong House Museum can be found online or by calling the Museum at 718.478.8274.  The Museum is located at 34-56 107th Street in Corona, Queens.Thanks to the vision and funding of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, the Louis Armstrong House Museum welcomes visitors from all over the world, six days per week, 52 weeks per year.

Wed, 01/09/2013 - 2:11 pm

This January, The National Jazz Museum in Harlem continues to offer a wide range of top quality free programming and affordable concerts from jazz’s most celebrated musicians, educators and historians.Our flagship educational program, Jazz For Curious Listeners, focuses on the visionary work of composer/saxophonist Wayne Shorter, with a series of events that shed light on various aspects of his genius. This series is presented in collaboration with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, which is presenting Mr. Shorter in concert at Carnegie Hall on February 1.Jazz at the Players returns with Israeli multi-reed player Anat Cohen, in duo with pianist Bruce Barth.Trombonist Luis Bonilla and clarinetist Andrew Sterman bring their ensembles to the Rubin Museum of Art for the NJMH’s longest running concert series, Harlem in the Himalayas.So, as you can see, it’s an action packed month for us, as usual. We hope to see you, your family and friends at as many of our events as you can make during this exciting month at The National Jazz Museum in Harlem. You’re bound to meet other similarly exciting, interesting and vital people – like yourselves!** Please note that our Visitors Center is closed for renovations through February 4th, and open only for evening events. Tuesday, January 8, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersWayne’s World (Shorter, That Is)images: Wayne on film7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: Maysles Cinema(343 Lenox Avenue between 127th & 128th)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300Highlights on film by the master musician Wayne Shorter, from his first days with At Blakey in 1959 to his current quartet. Wednesday, January 9, 2013Jazz Is: Now!Hosted by Jonathan Batiste and the STAY HUMAN bandSpecial Guest Monica Yunus, Soprano and Co-Founder of Sing for Hope7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126thFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Jazz Is: Now has evolved into a tremendously successful and totally original program headed by NJMH Associate Artistic Director Jonathan Batiste. Audience members participate throughout the evening, playing/singing/dancing/organizing the music (yes!), and having their endorphin levels raised at the same time. If this sounds too good to be true, then make sure you join us for this rousing celebration of the joy of music. Friday, January 11, 2013Harlem in the HimalayasLuis Bonilla7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street) $20/Door $18/Advance | For more information: rmanyc.orgLuis Bonilla, tromboneIvan Renta, saxophoneBruce Barth, pianoRobert Sabin, bassJohn Riley, drums"Bonilla slips, slides and scurries around some mesmerizing patterns from the rhythm section, neatly balancing the cerebral and the down-and dirty.” – Jazz TimesThe California raised, Costa Rican trombonist, composer and arranger is one of those rare artists whose work is always expanding, taking in more and more while remaining singular and focused: “Bonilla may be a trombonist used to handling that big long sliding thing, but when it comes to execution of his ideas, he lets nothing slide” -- All About JazzOf his first two albums on the Candid label, Pasos Gigantes and iEscucha! (2000) the former made Jazziz's top ten Latin list of 1998. His next album, 2007's Terminal Clarity was a celebration, reflection and aesthetic extension of his years working with Lester Bowie. While retaining the brash harmonic structures of his mentor's work from Brass Fantasy to his earlier and justly famous work with the Art Ensemble of Chicago, Bonilla adds a "contagious exuberance"  (Jazzwise magazine) that is at the heart of his artistic vision. Without in any way diminishing Bowie's audacity, Bonilla manages to balance "the cerebral and the down-and-dirty (Jazz Times), taking "bold steps to merge Latin genres, free jazz and a variety of other influences (Latin Jazz Corner).A heady mix of swing, rock, free jazz, funk, movie soundtracks, avant-garde noise and ballads, I Talking Now (2009), for all its musical diversity, speaks with one voice. It is a distinctly American vision, a gentle craziness that suggests that every one and every sound can co-exist if we just keep on taking in more and more. Luis Bonilla is moving in directions that are expanding our notions of jazz and leading us into startling new realms with "remarkable creativity and versatility" (Newsday). Tuesday, January 15, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersWayne’s World (Shorter, That Is)footprints: the early years with Blakey and Davis7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Extended listen and look the classic bands that made Wayne Shorter an international name, led by the fiery dynamo Art Blakey and jazz’s ultimate trendsetter, Miles Davis. Wednesday, January 16, 2013 Jazz at The PlayersAnat Cohen/Bruce Barth Duo7:00pmLocation: The Players(16 Gramercy Park South)$20 | For more information: 212-475-6116Clarinetist-saxophonist Anat Cohen has won hearts and minds the world over with her expressive virtuosity and delightful stage presence. Reviewing Anat’s 2008 headlining set with her quartet at the North See Jazz Festival, DownBeat said: “Cohen not only proved to be a woodwind revelation of dark tones and delicious lyricism, but also a dynamic bandleader who danced and shouted out encouragement to her group – whooping it up when pianist Jason Lindner followed her clarinet trills on a Latin-flavored number.With her dark, curly, shoulder-length hair swaying to the beat as she danced, she was a picture of joy.” Anat has been voted Clarinetist of the Year six years in a row by the Jazz Journalists Association, as well as 2012’s Multi-Reeds Player of the Year. That’s not to mention her topping of critics and readers polls in DownBeat magazine several years running. Anat has toured the world with her quartet, headlining at the Newport, Umbria, SF Jazz and North Sea jazz festivals as well as at such hallowed clubs as New York’s Village Vanguard. In September 2012, Anzic Records releases her sixth album as a bandleader, Claroscuro.The album ranges from buoyant dances to darkly lyrical ballads, drawing inspiration from New Orleans and New York, Africa and Brazil. In its ebullient, irresistible variety, Claroscuro encapsulates the description Jazz Police offered of Anat in full flight: “She becomes a singer, a poet, a mad scientist, laughing – musically – with the delight of reaching that new place, that new feeling, with each chorus.” Claroscuro takes its title from the Spanish word describing the play of light and shade (chiaroscuro in Italian).The album showcases Anat’s fluency in a global set of styles, from creolized New Orleans chanson and the evergreen swing of an Artie Shaw tune to African grooves and Brazilian choro, samba and more. Playing clarinet, bass clarinet and tenor and soprano saxophones, she was joined in the studio by her top-flight working band – pianist Jason Lindner, double-bassist Joe Martin and drummer Daniel Freedman – as well as special guests: trombonist/vocalist Wycliffe Gordon, percussionist Gilmar Gomes and star clarinetist Paquito D’Rivera. Recorded at Avatar Studios in Manhattan, Claroscuro comprises music from America, France, Brazil and South Africa played by kindred spirits from Israel, America, Brazil and Cuba. Reflecting on the naturally communicative, one-take spontaneity of the album, Anat says: “I’m playing with some of my favorite musicians in the world, and we all speak a common language, no matter where we come from.”Jazz pianist and composer Bruce Barth has been sharing his music with listeners the world over for more than two decades. Deeply rooted in the jazz tradition, his music reflects both the depth and breadth of his life and musical experiences. In addition to traveling widely performing his own music, he has also performed with revered jazz masters, as well as collaborated with leading musicians of his own generation. And most notably, his performances feature material from his large book of very powerful and imaginative original compositions, written in a voice that is both deeply personal and expressive. In a recent review in the Newark Star-Ledger, Zan Stewart writes “No one sounds quite like Barth. His solos are characterized by robust swing, his ability to tell a story, and by his rich, beguiling sound.”Bruce has performed on over one hundred recordings and movie soundtracks, including ten as a leader. He is equally at home playing solo piano (American Landscape on Satchmo Jazz Records), leading an all-star septet (East and West on MaxJazz), and composing for a variety of ensembles. His trio has recorded live at the legendary Village Vanguard in New York City, and he recently released a new DVD, Live at Café del Teatre, on Quadrant, recorded live at the Lleida Jazz Festival in Catalunia.Bruce arrived on the New York jazz scene in 1988, and soon joined the great tenor saxophonist Stanley Turrentine; their musical collaboration spanned a decade. Shortly thereafter, he toured Japan with Nat Adderley, and toured Europe and recorded with Vincent Herring’s quintet with Dave Douglas.In 1990, Bruce joined the Terence Blanchard Quintet; the band toured extensively, and also recorded six CDs, as well as several movie soundtracks. In 1992, Bruce played piano on-screen in Spike Lee’s Malcolm X.While in Terence Blanchard’s band, Bruce recorded his first two CD’s as a leader, In Focus and Morning Call for the Enja label; both were chosen for the New York Times’ top ten lists. These recordings displayed not only Bruce’s powerfully fluent piano playing, but also the scope of his own compositions and his imaginative arrangements of jazz standards.Throughout his professional life, Bruce has had extended collaborations with Tony Bennett, Steve Wilson, Terell Stafford, Luciana Souza, and Karrin Allyson and David Sanchez. And he has performed with James Moody, Phil Woods, Freddie Hubbard, Tom Harrell, Branford Marsalis, Wynton Marsalis, Art Farmer, Victor Lewis, John Patitucci, Lewis Nash, and the Mingus Big Band.Originally from Pasadena, California, Bruce was born into a musical family, and started banging on the piano almost before he could walk. By age five, he was taking lessons, although he preferred to play by ear. When he turned eight, his family moved to New York, where he studied piano and musicianship with Tony and Sue LaMagra for the next decade. For his fifteenth birthday, Bruce’s older brother, Rich, gave him his first jazz record, Mose Allison’s Back Country Suite. Bruce fell in love with both the music and the genre. Inspired, he taught himself to play jazz by listening to records and imitating his many favorite pianists and horn players. Later on, he studied privately with Norman Simmons and Neil Waltzer, and eventually enrolled in New England Conservatory in Boston, where he studied with Jaki Byard, Fred Hersch, and George Russell. Bruce’s first professional recording was Russell’s masterpiece, The African Game, captured live on Blue Note Records. In 2001, Bruce released East and West, which Stereophile called “one of the best jazz albums in recent memory.” It featured an all-star septet playing Bruce’s compositions based on his childhood memories of the western United States, with its deserts, ranches and ghost towns. Bruce continues to compose extensively for that septet, which has appeared at major jazz clubs in Manhattan including The Jazz Standard and Smoke, as well as at many European jazz festivals.In recent years, Bruce has made three solo piano tours of Japan, and has also performed with his trio throughout the United States and Europe. All About Jazz has described the trio, as heard on the Live at Café del Teatre DVD (featuring Doug Weiss on bass and Montez Coleman on drums) as “marked by keen empathy, sensitivity, and power.”Bruce’s frequent collaborators and band members have included: Adam Kolker, Tim Armacost, Scott Wendholt, George Robert, Dave Stryker, Carla Cook, Paula West, Rene Marie, Brad Leali, Sam Newsome, Luis Bonilla, Doug Weiss, Vicente Archer, Ed Howard, Ugonna Okegwo, Montez Coleman, Dana Hall, Adam Cruz, Pat O’Leary, Dayna Stephens, Chris Lightcap, and Rudy Royston.Bruce served two years on the panel for the U.S. State Department “Jazz Ambassadors” program, choosing jazz bands to represent the United States overseas. He is also a Grammy nominated producer, with more than twenty CDs to his credit.Finally, Bruce is a dedicated teacher, with more than ten years on the jazz faculty of Temple University in Philadelphia. He has also taught at Berklee College of Music, Long Island University, and currently teaches private lessons to City College University and New School students. Bruce has participated in many workshops, clinics, and seminars in the U. S. and abroad; he also maintains a private teaching studio, with students from the U.S., South America, Europe, and Japan. Friday, January 18, 2013Harlem in the HimalayasAndrew Sterman7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street) $20/Door $18/Advance | For more information: rmanyc.org Andrew Sterman's music has attracted praise from New York ( NYTimes: "beautiful and sensitive playing" ) to Paris ( Liberation: "Fabuleuse") and Australia ( The Age: "a sound as pure as moonlight" ). In addition to presenting his original ensembles, he has performed with a huge variety of major artists from Frank Sinatra, Philip Glass, Freddie Hubbard, Dizzy Gillespie, Sarah Vaughan, Aretha Franklin, to New York's premier new music ensembles, ISCM, EOS Orchestra, Bang On A Can, MATA, and of course is well known for his work in the Philip Glass Ensemble. Equally committed to composed and improvised music, Sterman's Comprovisations integrate both approaches into a wholly new concept. In the concept of Comprovisation , the piece and the performance are inseparable; performers are free to play their parts in a highly intuitive way, while the written composition controls the fundamental expression of the piece. This inspires improvisations unique to each piece which could not occur in another setting. In Sterman's music, traces of classic American song, contemporary composition, free-jazz, world music and many other influences come together to create a unique and deeply moving whole. Tuesday, January 22, 2013Jazz for Curious ListenersWayne’s World (Shorter, That Is)weather report plus7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Shorter’s years with the legendary band that included innovators Jaco Pastorius and Joe Zawinul will form the core of this evening’s event, plus interesting projects that grew out of that initial collaboration. Tuesday, January 29, 2013Jazz for Curious ListenersWayne’s World (Shorter, That Is)boundaries: new music +7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: NJMH Visitors Center(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300So much of Shorter’s music is, as Ellington liked to put it, “beyond category”. We’ll delve into the many facets of his Shorter that didn’t fit into the previous week’s session

Tue, 01/15/2013 - 11:25 am

When critics speak of Sonny Fortune, names like Coltrane, Cannonball, Young, Bechet, Hawkins and Parker are mentioned. Quite a legacy - but well deserved - for Sonny Fortune embodies all of the finest qualities of those late, great musicians: hard work, dedication to his art, and exceptional music. Lucky for us, Sonny is still here and blowing hard.The Philadelphia native (born 1939) has been on the jazz scene since his move to New York City in 1968.  Over all these years he's performed and recorded with many of the most notable jazz artists; Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, McCoy Tyner, Elvin Jones, Frank Foster, Mongo Santamaria and Buddy Rich to name a few. He's been a leader of his own groups and has released over a dozen recordings including three for the legendary Blue Note label.He's been featured on CBS TV's 48 Hours with Dan Rather; a featured soloist on the soundtrack for the Jack Nicholson film, The Crossing Guard, and was the subject of a CBS Sunday Morning feature with Billy Taylor. He headlined the first Chicago Playboy Jazz Festival and was the featured jazz performer at the Atlanta Montreaux International Music Festival. Sonny continues to tour with appearances at major festivals and clubs in the U.S., Canada, Europe and Japan. The noted author and critic Howard Mandel had this to say about Sonny Fortune:"Of all of Trane's lasting contributions, perhaps the greatest to the future of improvised music was his example of spiritual integrity and physical drive. Sonny blows with both."

Thu, 03/07/2013 - 7:55 pm

We’re jam packed with first-rate programming this month – we hope you can join us! And please note that our VISITORS CENTER has reopened, and you are welcome Monday thru Friday, 10AM – 4PM to spend some time getting…jazzed!  March 8, 2013Harlem in the HimalayasSteve Lehman Trio7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$18 in advance | $20 at door |For tickets: RMA Box Office or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344Described as "one of the transforming figures of early 21st century jazz," by The Guardian(UK) and as "a quietly dazzling saxophonist," by The New York Times, Steve Lehman (b. New York City, 1978) is a composer, performer, educator, and scholar who works across a broad spectrum of experimental musical idioms. Lehman's pieces for large orchestra and chamber ensembles have been performed by the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), So Percussion, Kammerensemble Neue Musik Berlin, the JACK Quartet, and the Talea Ensemble. His recent recording, Travail, Transformation & Flow (Pi 2009), was chosen as the #1 Jazz Album of the year by The New York Times.March 12, 2013Jazz for Curious ListenersApollo Stomp: An Evening of Dance on Film with Jacquie Tajah Murdock7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: Maysles Cinema(343 Lenox Avenue between 127th & 128th)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300 Harlem dance legend (and recent Lanvin model) octogenarian Jaquie Tajah Murdock hosts an evening of film and memories celebrating Harlem dance legends, from Alvin Ailey to Sammy Davis to Honi Coles and Gregory Hines. March 13, 2013Harlem in the HimalayasBen Wendel/ Dan Tepfer Duo7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$18 in advance | $20 at door |For tickets: RMA Box Office or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344Ben Wendel, SaxophoneDan Tepher, Piano NYC musicians Dan Tepfer and Ben Wendel will be playing the Rubin Museum for the release of their first duo album together, Small Constructions, out March 12th on Sunnyside Records. Pianist/composer Tepfer, a frequent collaborator of jazz great Lee Konitz's, has been described by the New York Times as "a player of exceptional poise who is drawn to the deeper currents of melody". The LA Times has praised saxophonist / bassoonist Wendel, a founding member of the Grammy-nominated band Kneebody, as "a composer with a restless ear". On Small Constructions, Wendel and Tepfer range from kaleidoscopic Monk and a remodeled standard to classical variations and melody-rich originals, creating a set of songs that expresses their mutual love of jazz, classical, pop and more. "A summit meeting of two steadily rising talents." -LA Times. http://dantepfer.com & http://benwendel.com March 13, 2013Jazz Is: Now!Hosted by Jonathan Batiste and the STAY HUMAN band with SPECIAL GUEST!7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: TBAFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Jazz Is: Now has evolved into a tremendously successful and totally original program headed by NJMH Associate Artistic Director Jonathan Batiste. Audience members participate throughout the evening, playing/singing/dancing/organizing the music (yes!), and having their endorphin levels raised at the same time. If this sounds too good to be true, then make sure you join us for this rousing celebration of the joy of music. March 14, 2013Harlem SpeaksJack Walrath, Trumpet6:30 – 8:30pmLocation: Flushing Town Hall(137-35 Northern Blvd., Flushing, NY | get directions)FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300Grammy-nominated trumpeter and arranger Jack Walrath has worked with Charles Mingus, Ray Charles, Miles Davis, Quincey Jones, Elvis Costello, and Gunther Schuller to name a few. He has written compositions and arrangements for Charles Mingus, Red Rodney, Ira Sullivan, Cecil Brooks III, the Brooklyn Symphone Orchestra and the Charli Persip Superband amongst many others.Jack has written soundtracks as well as liner notes and articles for Downbeat and the Music Review. In addition to leading his own jazz groups, The Jack Walrath Group, Wholly Trinity, Hard Corps, The Masters of Suspense, and a quintet, he was also the leader of the Mingus Dynasty and The Charles Mingus Big Band.In addition to conducting seminars all around the world and teaching master classes in NewYork City, Jack continues to record as a sideman and leader and is currently writing a book on his experiences with Mingus, influential recordings, and the music business. March 15, 2013Harlem in the HimalayasDave Eggar + Fred Hersch7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$18 in advance | $20 at door |For tickets: RMA Box Office or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344Dave Eggar, Cello Fred Hersch, Piano A musical prodigy as a child, Dave Eggar began playing the cello and piano at age three. By the age of seven Eggar had performed on Broadway and with the Metropolitan Opera. He had his debut at Carnegie Hall at the age of fifteen. Eggar is a graduate of Harvard University and the Julliard School's Doctoral Program. His mission to "not just cross over, but to cross through" multiple genres of music is apparent in all of his releases. Whether it's classical, reggae, bluegrass, jazz, pop, or world music, Eggar finds a common voice within his musical vocabulary and introduces it with his own unique imaginative vision.Pianist and composer Fred Hersch has earned his place among the foremost jazz artists and creative musicians in the world today. He is widely recognized for his ability to steadfastly create a unique body of original works while reinventing the standard jazz repertoire--investing time-tested classics with keen insight, fresh ideas, and extraordinary technique.Hersch's many accomplishments include two Grammy nominations for Best Jazz Instrumental Performance and one for Best Instrumental Composition, and a 2003 Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship for composition."Hersch's work has developed an intensity of intelligence and emotional directness unparalleled among his peers." - Steve Futterman, The New Yorker

Sun, 04/07/2013 - 5:11 pm

This April, The National Jazz Museum in Harlem continues to offer a wide range of top quality free programming and affordable concerts from jazz’s most celebrated musicians, educators and historians. With International Jazz Day on April 30th our Jazz For Curious Listeners series this month focuses on international artists discussing and demonstrating jazz from around the world and culminates with an international jazz jam blowout with Jonathan Batiste on April 30th at MIST Harlem. Our Scandinavian and European followers may be able to join Loren Schoenberg's IJD events in Norway and The Netherlands.For our friends on the West Coast, join the museum’s Artistic Director Loren Schoenberg for a discussion on the Savory collection at Stanford University’s Cantor Arts Center.We hope to see you, your family and friends at as many of our events as you can make during this exciting month at The National Jazz Museum in Harlem. You’re bound to meet other similarly exciting, interesting and vital people – like yourselves!Tuesday, April 2, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersInternational Jazz @ NJMH Featuring Ole Mathisen (Norway)7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126thFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300  Saxophonist, composer, and producer, Ole Mathisen presents and discusses tracks spanning his 25 year career as a recording artist. Emphasizing cross-cultural jazz projects, the session will encompass collaborations starting in Boston right after graduating from Berklee College of Music in Boston with drummer extraordinaire Bob Moses, all the way up until todays work with cutting edge groups like the chamber jazz ensemble FFEAR, Iraqi maqam and jazz infused Two Rivers, and contemporary latin jazz ensemble, Afromantra. The session will include a short demonstration of developing a micro-tonal and a fluid odd-meter rhythmic language on the saxophone.Tuesday, April 9, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersInternational Jazz @ NJMH Featuring Rez Abbasi on South Asian Jazz7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126thFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Leading up to our April 30th International Jazz Day concert at MIST, Jazz For Curious Listeners is focusing on the global influence of jazz with NYC’s premiere jazz musicians from around the world. This evening, join guitarist Rez Abbasi as he discusses South Asian music and its connection to Jazz. For over a decade, Abbasi has been blazing a new trail as a leading figure in South Asian - American cutting edge jazz. His work spans far and wide, performing in award-winning groups as Rudresh Mahanthappa’s Indo- Pak Coalition and Kinsmen and Indian Juno award winning vocalist, Kiran Ahluwalia’s group along with many other projects. In 2012, Abbasi was voted #2 Rising Star Guitarist in Down Beat magazine's prestigious International Critic's Poll. Rez Abbasi migrated to the US from Pakistan at age four. Since an early age he has immersed himself in both western and eastern music, studying and performing with a variety of Indian classical musicians as well as jazz musicians. His compositions and playing reflect his individuality and create an ideal hybrid of modern jazz and world inflections.  Rez has released several albums as a leader, from acoustic guitar driven quartet music, to electrified organ trio featuring Indian vocals. His ultra - modern quintet, Invocation pulls all aspects of his persona into a cohesive, distinctive voice, rarely paralleled in today’s jazz. Including band mates, Mahanthappa, Vijay Iyer, Dan Weiss, Johannes Weidenmueller and guest, Kiran Ahluwalia, Invocation’s debut release, Things To Come (sunnyside 2009) was included in Downbeat magazine’s ‘best albums of the decade’. That same year Rez received the prestigious Chamber Music America New Works grant for composition. For Invocation’s second release, Suno Suno (enja 2011) and his eighth recording, Rez’s compositions focused on a musical form from Pakistan called, Qawwali. With hard-driving grooves and sophisticated melodies, Suno Suno ended the year on many critics ‘best of’ lists. Thursday, April 11, 2013 Jazz Is: Now! Hosted by Jonathan Batiste and the STAY HUMAN Band7:00 – 8:30pmLocation: Dance Theatre of Harlem466 W 152nd St, New York, NY 10031FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 Jazz Is: Now! has become the museum’s most popular program – hosted by Jonathan Batiste and is Stay Human band, it’s a must for people who want to feel the live buzz and electricity of jazz in the moment! Join us back at the Dance Theatre of Harlem for a very special night- you’re in for a treat! Friday, April 12, 2013 PBS: American Songbook and the NJMH Savory Collection Look for the NJMH on PBS’s acclaimed MICHAEL FEINSTEIN’S AMERICAN SONGBOOK series on Friday 4/12. Liza Minnelli and others are also featured in the broadcast.The Museum’s Savory Collection (over 100 hours of previously unknown classic jazz from 1936-46) brought Michael to Harlem, where he did an impromptu jam with NJMH Artistic Director Loren Schoenberg, and to Grammy-award winning sound engineer Doug Pomeroy’s studio to get an in-depth look and listen to these historic recordings. Read the great NY Times Article on the Savory Collection here.MICHAEL FEINSTEIN’S AMERICAN SONGBOOK airs as part of PBS ARTS, one of broadcast television’s only programming blocks dedicated to the best in performing arts, on Fridays, April 5, 2013, 9:00-11:00 p.m. ET and April 12, 2013, 10:00-11:00 p.m. ET on PBSFriday, April 12, 2013 Harlem in the Himalayas                                                                         Adam Kromelow Trio7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$20/Door $18/Advance | For more information: rmanyc.org Described as “the real deal” by All About Jazz and “a sensational pianist, and brilliant young musician” by The Buffalo News, pianist Adam Kromelow is making a name for himself in today’s music scene. Originally from the north suburbs of Chicago, Adam grew up listening to all kinds of music, and fostered a love for playing piano at an early age. When he was eighteen, he moved to New York City to study at the prestigious Manhattan School of Music from which he graduated in 2011. There, he was fortunate enough to study with modern jazz piano icons Jason Moran and Vijay Iyer. Adam’s trio has been turning heads with the release of their debut album Youngblood on ZOHO Records. This album, produced by Grammy-winning pianist Arturo O’Farrill, reached #14 on the College Music Journal radio charts and has been widely acclaimed by critics. It was chosen as one of the Top Ten CDs of 2012 by The Philadelphia Inquirer, named the Debut Album of the Year by Nippertown Magazine, and hailed as “one of the most captivating discs by a jazz trio in years” by The Toledo Blade. Aside from his trio, Adam has been performing throughout the country with numerous ensembles. In the winter of 2010, he made his debut with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra as a guest soloist for their Welcome Yule concerts at Chicago’s Symphony Hall. In addition, Adam was selected by pianist Brad Mehldau to perform in his solo piano master class held by the Carnegie Hall Professional Training Workshop. Tuesday, April 16, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersInternational Jazz @ NJMH Featuring James Shipp on Swinging Across Cutlures: Celtic, Caribbean, and Brazilian Rhythms and more!7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126thFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300     Leading up to our April 30th International Jazz Day concert at MIST, Jazz For Curious Listeners is focusing on the global influence of jazz with NYC’s premiere jazz musicians rooted in cross-cultural collaboration. Shipp plays a wide variety of instruments and styles, most which are based in or around jazz, which he refers to as the “big tent” in the international music world.A comparative discussion and demonstration of what it means (and how it sounds) to be 'swinging' in the contexts of jazz, traditional Irish music, South American musics, and music from northern Africa, including both recorded examples and live examples played by percussionist James Shipp on the vibraphone, the Irish bodhran, the Brazilian pandeiro, the Peruvian cajon, and the Moroccan Qraqeb.Brooklyn-based James Shipp is a vibraphonist, percussionist, and composer/songwriter in the creative music scene of New York City. As a multi-instrumentalist and cultural explorer, he enjoys constantly performing in new, exciting, and dispirate musical situations. As a bandleader, he enjoys blurring the lines between jazz, Brazilian music, UK folk, and open improvisation in his duo with trumpeter Nadje Noordhuis, his Brazilian band Choro Dragão, and his eclectic song-focused Irish project, Nós Novo, James studied jazz vibraphone in his conservatory days, and has since expanded into playing percussion for Afro-Brazilian and Celtic groups, as well as with several of New York’s top genre-blurring singer-songwriters and modern large ensembles. James has performed with numerous masters of the jazz world and beyond, including vocalists Kurt Elling and Kate McGarry, saxophonists Paquito D‘Rivera, Anat Cohen, and Jane Ira Bloom, and tabla legend Ustad Zakir Hussain. In the fall of 2011, James was asked to take part in developing the percussive accompaniments to the songs of Sting’s forthcoming musical, ‘The Last Ship.’  Join us for a unique demonstration and discussion on the threads between Brazilian, Caribbean, and Celtic traditions and rhythms- not a combination you find every day!http://www.jamesshipp.com Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Jazz at The PlayersBill Kirchner, Carol Fredette, Marc Copland7:00 pm   Location: The Players ,16 Gramery Park South$20 | Reservations: reservations@theplayersnyc.org or 212-475-6116 Join us for an exquisite evening of chamber-jazz organized by soprano saxophonist Bill Kirchner, playing alongside two long-time associates. This promises to be a unique evening of improvised music in the best jazz tradition."Bill Kirchner is one of those rare musicians who is able to synthesize an awareness of the past with his own voice, taking jazz in new directions that are firmly based on tradition.” – Benny Carter “Carol Fredette is everything you need in a jazz singer. She thinks, swings and phrases like a creative instrumentalist, yet her way with words captures the essence of a lyric” – Dan Morgenstern, author, jazz historian, critic On Marc Copland “A quiet giant of his instrument…the stuff of legend” – All About Jazz.com Thursday, April 18, 2013 NJMH and Stanford Live Presents Jazz Talks @ The Cantor             The Savory Collection Side B: The Great Bands12:00pmLocation: The Cantor Arts Center @ Stanford UniversityFree | For more information: museum.stanford.edu Loren Schoenberg, artistic director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, shares treasures from the Savory Collection, an archive of recently unearthed, rare recordings made during the swing era. “Side B”, the lecture of a series of three, includes live recordings of the great bands of Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, and Chick Webb. Tuesday, April 23, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersInternational Jazz @ NJMH Featuring Scholar Aryeh Tepper on The Problematic Power of Music7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126thFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300     Leading up to our April 30th International Jazz Day concert at MIST, Jazz For Curious Listeners is focusing on the global influence of music. The title of this talk, “The Problematic Power of Music," might sound strange. What exactly is the problem? With an MP3 file in hand there’s no limit to when and where you can commune with the muse. And when the headphones come off, music is the background sound that soothes you while you're put on hold and the beat that moves you while you shop. You like what you like, and I like what I like, so what’s the problem?But a little reflection should help us remember that music is a mysterious thing. Play the right song and you can stimulate a man to make love, or war - and sometimes the love is adulterous while the war is just. Music holds out the promise of marrying the rational and passionate parts of our soul and fashioning a harmonious personality, but it can also damn the voice of reason and, in a romantic swirl of emotion, supply the soundtrack for murder. Music is, in other words, a power, and a very ambiguous power at that.In this talk we'll begin by taking a look at the political-philosophical tradition stretching from Plato to Nietzsche that is aware of music's ambiguous power and that takes seriously the power of music for public purposes. We'll then examine the Hebrew Bible’s two-fold teaching regarding music’s ambiguous power. The Biblical view will be deepened through philosophical, theological, and literary variations on, and illustrations of, the original Biblical principles, from Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus to Al-Ghazali's Sufi teaching. We'll conclude by exploring the limits of the Biblical teaching.Tuesday, April 30, 2013SPECIAL EVENT: International Jazz Day with NJMH                                            The National Jazz Museum in Harlem Presents: International Jazz Day Jam Session Ft. Jonathan Batiste and Global Jazz Artists!            Doors at 7:00pm Show at 8:00Location: MIST Harlem, 46 West 116th StreetFREE with Suggested Donation of $20 | For more information: 212-348-8300      In honor of International Jazz Day, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem will illuminate the truly global roots of jazz with an international jam session led by Jonathan Batiste. Jonathan, the museum’s Artistic Director-At-Large, will engage with musicians from all over the world to demonstrate the universal language of jazz. Featuring artists from 7 different countries the session will bring together Punjabi dhol beats from Red Baraat’s Sunny Jain, Malian kora and vocals from master griots Yacouba Sissoko and Awa Sangho, deep and thoughtful bass grooves from Japan’s Noriko Ueda, Brazilian, Caribbean and Celtic percussion and vibes by James Shipp, Bolivian folk and jazz vocals from Gian-Carla Tisera and more!We hope you’ll join us for this evening of improvisation and ear-opening collaboration at MIST Harlem!

Tue, 04/16/2013 - 8:46 am

Due to increased demand, the International Jazz Day event Louis Armstrong at Freedomland: Never Before Heard Recordings of an American Icon, a Listening Session & Lecture on April 30th has been relocated to the Langston Hughes Community Library and Cultural Center located at 10001 Northern Boulevard, Corona, NY 11368. The program presented by the Louis Armstrong House Museum and the Jazz Journalists Association was originally to be held at the Louis Armstrong House Museum in Corona. The event is free and open to the public and includes a soul food reception; the program begins at 2:00 pm.This event celebrates International Jazz Day (sponsored by UNESCO), and the culmination of Jazz Appreciation Month (a major initiative of the Smithsonian Institution) with the public premier of newly discovered recordings by the beloved trumpeter and entertainer, Armstrong, at a fabled although short-lived Bronx amusement park in 1961. Highlights from Armstrong's live performances from the 85-acre park billed as the "World's Largest Entertainment Center," which boasted more than 63,000 guests for its opening day in 1960, will be played. These recordings, recently donated to the Museum by the son of Freedomland sound engineer Peter Denis, have never been circulated or issued, and are not listed in jazz discographies.The program will be presented and interpreted by Ricky Riccardi and Dan Morgenstern.  Mr. Riccardi is the Museum's Archivist and the author of What a Wonderful World: The Magic of Louis Armstrong's Later Years.  Dan Morgenstern, newly added to the program, recently retired Director of the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers University and a Lifetime Achievement in Jazz Journalism honoree of the JJA's. He is a jazz historian and archivist, author, editor, and educator who has been active in the jazz field since 1958. A prolific annotator of record albums, Morgenstern has won seven Grammy Awards for Best Album Notes (1973, 1974, 1976, 1981, 1991, 1995, 2006, and 2009). He received ASCAP's Deems Taylor Award for Jazz People in 1977 and in 2005 for Living with Jazz. In 2007, Dan Morgenstern was named the National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master, the nation’s highest honor in Jazz.New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has issued a proclamation honoring International Jazz Day, which will be presented as part of the program.Following the presentation, the Jazz Journalists Association will toast Armstrong at a special soul food reception to mark the finale of its JazzApril media campaign at in support of Jazz Appreciation Month, International Jazz Day and grassroots jazz activism in the U.S. and beyond.Reservations for this free event can be made by calling the Louis Armstrong House Museum at 718.478.8274.Further information about the Jazz Journalists Association is available from President@jazzjournalists.org. The Jazz Journalists Association media campaign for JazzApril can be found online at www.JazzApril.com. The Louis Armstrong House Museum can be found online at www.LouisArmstrongHouse.org

Wed, 04/17/2013 - 10:21 am

Harlem Blues & Jazz Band founder Al Vollmer was seized by the jazz bug at age sixteen while growing up in Sweden. He came to the US in 1947 and never left.  He went on to become an orthodontist and to follow his dream of meeting and getting to know some of the musicians he had only heard on recordings. He did just that and in 1973 the Harlem Blues & Jazz Band, was founded by King Oliver's trombonist/blues singer Clyde Bernhardt and Al Vollmer, dedicated to keeping the significant side-men of the Classic Jazz Period working and not forgotten.The band has always had a strong link to Louis Armstrong from its inception. George James, the first saxophonist in the band, was with Armstrong in the '30's and participated in Armstrong's first triumphant return to his Native New Orleans. Bassist Johnny Williams joined and remained with the band for 25 years until his death in 1998 at the age of 90. He had been with Armstrong in the late '30's and again in the early '40's. (On occasion he would vocalize with Louis on the famous number "Rockin' Chair".)An impressive number of musicians from the Classic and Swing eras have graced the various groups throughout the years, thereby giving an enviable authenticity and historical significance to the band's performances and recordings.The Harlem Blues & Jazz Band was showcased in a documentary film by Anja Baron and Al Vollmer titled "The Last of the First". The documentary was acclaimed (2004) at prestigious film festivals in New York (Tribeca), Los Angeles and Newport R.I. Dr. Vollmer served as jazz consultant and Executive Producer for this crucial documentation of a significant part of jazz history. The most recent documentary film on the band is by Yuliya Tikanova  from Kazakhstan, acclaimed in Hollywood and Mumbi India.Past members who have graced the band: Trumpets: Franc Williams "Doc" Cheatham, Bill Dillard  Trombone: Clyde Bernhardt, Eddie Durham Saxophone: George James, Charlie Holmes, Eddie Chamblee, George Kelly Piano: Sammy Benskin, Ram "Ramirez", Lloyd Meyers  Guitar: Al Casey (18 yrs) Bass: Johnny WIlliams (25 yrs), Al Hall Drums: Tommy Benford, Johnny Blowers (20 yrs)  Vocalist: Miss Rhapsody, Laurel Watson, Maxine SullivanSaint Peter's Church 619 Lexington Avenue @ 54th Street7:30 pm, followed by reception and photo exhibit, $20. donationAdvance tickets: 516-992-2010, Email: cobijazz@optonline.net | Contact: Al Vollmer 914-659-2257

Fri, 04/26/2013 - 2:08 pm

When Sly and The Family Stone hit the scene back in the late ‘60s, the world – socially, culturally and politically – was in a state of upheaval.  And their music perfectly evangelized the moment.  Today, we stand dangerously at the edge of a similar precipice – and that message of celebratory potential and jubilant clarity is sorely needed.  With that concept squarely implanted in his mind’s eye, visionary conceptualist, producer, arranger, composer and keyboard wizard Jason Miles has created the extraordinary Sly Reimagined on the Zoho Roots label.  With his groundbreaking, genre-defying borderless mothership Global Noize providing the vehicle, Miles takes on eight classic Sly Stone journeys into the wilds of a reality nearly half a century beyond their point of inception.Nobody is more capable or qualified to take on a project like this than the Grammy-winning Miles.  His groundbreaking synth programming for Miles Davis’ ‘80s masterpieces Tutu, Music from Siesta and Amandla; along with his contributions to a genre-crossing array of artists - including Luther Vandross, Aretha Franklin, Michael Jackson, Ruben Blades, David Sanborn, Whitney Houston, Grover Washington Jr., The Crusaders, Chaka Khan and so many others - have led to a variety of legacy-based dedications to Marvin Gaye, Ivan Lins, Vandross, Grover…and now Sly.Reimagined is the ideal description as the music on this CD doesn’t simply pay homage, but also defines the timelessness of the music by translating it to the forefront of musical thinking here in 2013.  Global Noize – with its triumvirate of Miles, turntable master DJ Logic and vocalist Falu – is accompanied on this recording by an astonishing array of nearly two dozen musical powerhouses, including Nona Hendryx, Roberta Flack, Jay Rodriguez, Amanda Ruzza and the original Family Stone drummer Greg Errico.The nine vocalists and seventeen instrumentalists are woven masterfully into the musical context of each piece – no contrivance, no excess, no aural gymnastics, just extraordinary musicianship, impeccable tastefulness and a relentless sense of groove.  The musicians weave in and out, emerging at the always appropriate moment and then sinking back into the perfect mix.  There is a visceral sense of ensemble playing, as live and cohesive as the 1968 concert performance at the Fillmore East where Jason first experienced Sly and The Family Stone, becoming forever connected to its unique musical expression.  But while that group never could have existed without the foundation of James Brown, vocal groups from the Orioles through the Temptations, jubilant jazz of Louis Jordan through Mingus and Sun Ra, and all strains of Gospel and Blues, Sly Reimagined shows the influences of the post-Sly environment of P-Funk, Prince and the many explorers stimulated by Sly and The Family Stone.  All cross-bred with the borderless context of the here and now at its richest.Two songs are given dual treatments.  It’s a Family Affair – both with Roberta Flack on lead vocals – receives a Groove Vibe Version and the Falu Mumbai Mix.  The former a deeply grooved percussive blend with horns, voices, rhythm and DJ Logic all circling around in an infectious round-robin; the latter sparer, leaner, meaner and tinged with Eastern harmonic and rhythmic flavors that offer testimony to the sub-title.  Nona Hendryx sings lead on both versions of The Same Thing. The straight-up version is an extremely funky excursion with a dark gurgle of baritone sax (courtesy Jay Rodriguez) all swaggering, staggering and lurching forward like a super-hip drunk on a fervent mission for The Funk.  The Mulholland Drive Mix plows similar ground, but coupling a deep bass groove with a strong spicing of the classic tenor/organ combo tradition.The Big Horn tenor style – this time in the hands of Ron Holloway - is also featured on Fun with a raucous solo that evokes the irresistible sound of Gene Ammons and Arnett Cobb.  Surrounding it is a vividly syncopated groove kick, a passionately soulful vocal by Maya Azucena, DJ Logic’s turntable magic, a chanting chorus and lots of undiluted fun.Maya’s vocals also take the lead on two other pieces.  You Can Make It If You Try, a richly layered celebration with a distinct P-Funk feel, the funky trumpet of Ingrid Jensen, and Rodriguez updating Jr. Walker into the 21st Century.  On Stand, a proudly upright and emphatic take on the anthem, Maya soars over a chorus of vocalists chanting it out in Funkadelicized Gospel jubilation.  She also provides playful and expressive support for Nona Hendryx’s lead on In Time, an easy-grooved percussive jaunt stoked by rich synthesizer textures.Global Noize regular Falu is up front on the brilliant Thank You For Talking To Me Africa – with a side trip to India via her Carnatic vocal approach.  An ultra-thick body built on a saxophone choir (arrangement and all saxes by Jeff Coffin), sets a tantalizing groove that oozes like a lava flow and just keeps digging deeper and deeper and deeper into the darkest lustre of pure funk. Falu’s exotic, sinuous style is also ideal for Dreams, an appropriately ethereal and evocative soundscape built upon a pastiche of electronica that closes out this remarkable album in a most palpably emotional manner.The presence of Jason Miles is at the core of every element of this truly remarkable album.  Not only does the concept flow stem from the heart and soul of his remarkable musical vision; but also the keyboards, synthesizer and programming that comprise his instruments of aural expression permeate every moment of this music, holding it together and binding all of the parts into a most singular sensibility.  Sly Reimagined is an album that can be experienced for its sheer joy, or dug into more deeply for in unlimited depth of artistic expression.For more information about Jason Miles and this album, visit http://www.jasonmilesmusic.com and http://www.zohomusic.com

Mon, 04/29/2013 - 2:31 pm

The National Jazz Museum in Harlem continues to offer a wide range of top quality free programming and affordable concerts from jazz’s most celebrated musicians, educators and historians. This May, NJMH will take a closer look into different mediums of storytelling with fresh new programming that approaches the theme from several angles ranging from conversations to performances to film to poetry slams!Harlem Speaks, our flagship public program of oral histories, is taking a new direction this month as we present our first ever poetry slam! Born out of the jazz-infused poetry of the Harlem Renaissance, slam poetry is goldmine of oral histories and with two nights on the themes of Harlem and Jazz we will hear fresh new stories on the neighborhood and music we love.This month’s Jazz For Curious Listeners transports us into Christian McBride’s living room as he sits down with us and catches us up on the big year he’s had. From leading the Monterey Jazz Festival On Tour ensemble to traveling across the globe with his own band and others. Christian will have wonderful stories from the road to share with us.This May the museum launches the new Parallax Conversation Series. Parallax is defined as “the effect whereby the position or direction of an object appears to differ when viewed from different positions.” In this series we will pair two fascinating people who approach a common idea from vastly different perspectives or mediums to improvise on a theme. We begin with master storyteller from Sierra Leone in conversation with the head of the StoryCorps Griot Initiative and then pair kora player and griot with a tap dancer. All four participants are deeply rooted in the world of storytelling but come from opposite ends of the spectrum. We hope you’ll join us to find out what happens when we put them together!So, as you can see, it’s an action packed month for us, as usual. We hope to see you, your family and friends at as many of our events as you can make during this exciting month at The National Jazz Museum in Harlem. You’re bound to meet other similarly exciting, interesting and vital people – like yourselves! Friday, May 3, 2013 Harlem in the Himalayas                                                                         Roy Assaf Trio7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$20/Door $18/Advance | For more information: rmanyc.orgBeer Sheba-born, Tel Aviv-raised, and New York-based Roy Assaf brings his trio and their Middle Eastern/Latin American jazz melding to the Rubin. One of the most promising young pianists and composers on the scene today, Assaf has already racked up some prestigious prizes, including an ASCAP Young Jazz Composer award, and Down Beat student performance and arranging awards. He's played on more than 20 albums as a sideman and co-leader, and released his first solo disc, Respect, in 2012. Tuesday, May 7, 2013 Parallax Conversation SeriesKewulay Kamara and Melvin Reeves 7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126thFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                Parallax: noun- The effect whereby the position or direction of an object appears to differ when viewed from different positions.In the first of our Parallax Conversation Series we bring together Sierra Leonian poet/storyteller Kewulay Kamara and StoryCorps Griot manager, Melvin Reeves for an evening of improvisation. Both ardent preservers, collectors, and presenters of stories they no doubt have plenty to talk about but what happens when we give them one word to riff on: “why”? Please join us for what promises to be a wild evening. Get to know the participants!Kewulay Kamara is a poet/storyteller, multi-media artist and an internationally renowned performer  who has performed at major venues and cultural centers, including The Cathedral of St John the Divine, The Kitchen, Symphony Space, Gerald Lynch Theater, City Center, The Museum of Natural History and Oxford University, and participated in the Langston Hughes Festival and more. He is the recipient of numerous grant awards from major foundations including the Ford Foundation, New York State Council on the Arts, National Geographic, and National Endowment for the Arts. Kewulay Kamara is working on a forthcoming documentary of epic poetry and history.Melvin Reeves came to StoryCorps in September 2006 to manage StoryCorps Griot, a one-year initiative that collected the stories of 1750 African Americans around the country.  He has also planned initiatives that focused on Alaskan, Latino, Jewish and LGBTQ communities.  He is the Associate Director for Education and Special Projects, and he is currently focusing on StoryCorps U, a program designed to place StoryCorps content and process in schools around the country. More on StoryCorps here:www.storycorps.orgTuesday, May 14, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersCatching up with Christian7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: Maysles Cinema(343 Lenox Avenue between 127th & 128th)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                It’s been a while since Christian McBride has sat down and talked with us, and we miss him as much as he misses us. Christian has had a busy year- so what else is new?-and has a lot to lay on us. From leading the Monterey Jazz Festival On Tour to performing across the globe with his group and others, we have a lot of catching up to do. Join us as we get transported into his living room as he regales us with stories from the road and updates us on the great projects he is working on. Wednesday, May 15, 2013 Harlem SpeaksPortraits of Harlem Poetry Slam Competition- Theme: Harlem6:30-8:30Location: MIST Harlem(46 West 116th Street)Suggested Donation of $20 | For more information: 212-348-8300     It's only a hop, skip and jump from the poetry of the Harlem Renaissance to slam poetry. Please join us on May 15th and 29th as the National Jazz Museum in Harlem hosts two amazing evenings of contemporary creativity. You're invited to participate, and there'll be prize as well. From Langston Hughes to Claude McKay to Jean Toomer, the poets of the Harlem Renaissance created stunning and powerful portraits of Harlem and the African-American experience. Jazz musicians were doing the same thing with music, and the marriage of the two laid the foundation for the modern art form of slam poetry. This two-night poetry slam competition will premiere contemporary vignettes of our neighborhood and the music. Poets from all ages, backgrounds and neighborhoods can send in sample work for consideration and 14 will be chosen to kick-off the competition with the theme as “Harlem.” On the second night, with the topic being “Jazz”, the poets will improvise with musicians and judges will select one grand-prize winner. Peppered with live music and quick-fire poetry improvisation, the event will be the first of its kind for us and we hope you’ll join us as we showcase the new stories of our beloved Harlem and jazz! To submit your work for consideration please send a sample to Meera Dugal at mdugal@jmih.org.                                                                           Tuesday, May 21, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersCatching up with Christian7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126thFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300 It’s been a while since Christian McBride has sat down and talked with us and he misses it! Christian has had a busy year from leading the Monterey Jazz Festival On Tour to performing across the country with his group Inside Straight and we have a lot of catching up to do. Join us as we get transported into his living room as he regales us with stories from the road and updates us on the great projects he is working on!                                                                              Tuesday, May 28, 2013 Parallax Conversation SeriesAndrew Nemr and Yacouba Sissoko7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: Metropolitan Community United Methodist Church,NE Corner of 126th Street and Madison Avenue, enter on 126thFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 Parallax: noun- The effect whereby the position or direction of an object appears to differ when viewed from different positions.What happens when you pair two storytellers together? Two great stories, right? What happens when one is an American tap dancer and the other is a Malian kora player? Join us for the second installment of the Parallax Conversation Series to find out as these two master storytellers of different mediums get together for a spontaneous reaction to the word “Jazz.” Anything can happen with these two together- you won’t want to miss it! Get to know the participants!Andrew Nemr, mentored by Gregory Hines, is considered one of the most diverse tap dance artists today. Andrew has garnered a reputation for impeccable musicianship and sensitivity, and respect for the craft that he loves. Andrew received an NEA Masterpieces: Dance Initiative Grant to reconstruct the works of classic tap dance soloists, garnering critical and popular acclaim upon their presentation in Echoes In Time. An experienced soloist, Andrew has performed in various venues nationally and internationally including the Blue Note Jazz Club, NY, Town Hall Theatre, NY, The Duke Theatre, NY and more. Andrew was featured alongside Jazz greats Clark Terry, Jimmy Heath, Hank Jones, James Carter, and John Faddis in A Great Night in Harlem at the Apollo Theatre, NY. He has also been the featured tap dancer with the Duke Ellington Orchestra presenting Duke Ellington: The Sacred Concerts, and with the Lionel Hampton Orchestra. Andrew performed regularly with the legendary Les Paul at the Iridium Jazz Club, NYC. Andresw is also a founding member and dance captain of Savion Glover’s TiDii.Yacouba Sissoko is a Master Kora player from the Djely griot tradition. He was born in Kita, Mali. His grandfather, Samakoun Tounkara, began teaching Yacouba when he was 9 years old.In 1993, Souleymane Koli,the leader of the Ensemble Koteba of Abidjan recruited him. Yacouba spend the next 5 years performing all over the world with this 45-piece band. In his career, he has traveled to almost every nation on the African continent, as well as most of Europe, Canada, the US and Australia. He is in demand as one of the best kora players in the world, playing with jazz, Latin and R & B bands as well as traditional African ceremonies.  As leader of his own band, Siya, and member of the group Super Mande, Yacouba continues to record with many famous musicians, including the groups Source, Tamalalou and Fula Flute.  Currently, Yacouba plays with a variety of well known artists such as Regina Carter, Awa Sangho, Rachel Brown, Kavita Shah, Kakande and Leni Stern. Yacouba also has had the opportunity to record with Harry Belafonte and Paul Simons.  In addition, Yacouba works in partnership with La Maison d'Art Gallery in Harlem as a collaborator in bringing some other musicians as part of the galleries' events. Wednesday, May 29, 2013 Harlem SpeaksPortraits of Harlem Poetry Slam Competition: Theme: Jazz6:30-8:30Location: MIST Harlem(46 West 116th Street)Suggested Donation of $20 | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                               It's only a hop, skip and jump from the poetry of the Harlem Renaissance to slam poetry. Please join us on May 15th and 29th as the National Jazz Museum in Harlem hosts two amazing evenings of contemporary creativity. You're invited to participate, and there'll be prize as well. From Langston Hughes to Claude McKay to Jean Toomer, the poets of the Harlem Renaissance created stunning and powerful portraits of Harlem and the African-American experience. Jazz musicians were doing the same thing with music, and the marriage of the two laid the foundation for the modern art form of slam poetry. This two-night poetry slam competition will premiere contemporary vignettes of our neighborhood and the music. Poets from all ages, backgrounds and neighborhoods can send in sample work for consideration and 14 will be chosen to kick-off the competition with the theme as “Harlem.” On the second night, with the topic being “Jazz”, the poets will improvise with musicians and judges will select one grand-prize winner. Peppered with live music and quick-fire poetry improvisation, the event will be the first of its kind for us and we hope you’ll join us as we showcase the new stories of our beloved Harlem and jazz!

Fri, 05/10/2013 - 11:01 am

Baseball was Louis Armstrong’s favorite sport and he followed it passionately. A longtime Brooklyn Dodgers fan, Louis switched to the New York Mets in the late 60s, even attending the deciding game 5 of the 1969 World Series. The new exhibit debuting at the Louis Armstrong House Museum – Swinging with the All Stars: Louis Armstrong & Baseball includes photos and artifacts exploring Louis's relationship with the game including Louis’s handwritten list of “my four choice Dodger players at all times,” a photo of Louis backstage with Dodgers Don Newcombe and Junior Gilliam, a rare Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald “baseball card” from Holland, and one of Louis’s famed tape box collages featuring a photo of the trumpeter with New York Yankees Phil Rizzuto and Joe Collins.The exhibit will also contain information about Louis’s “Secret 9” baseball team.  In the summer of 1931, Louis returned to New Orleans for the first time since leaving it for Chicago in 1922. While there, Armstrong took interest in a sandlot team, bought them brand new equipment and uniforms and renamed them “Armstrong’s Secret 9.” The exhibit will include a photo of the Secret 9, an advertisement for one of their games taken from one of Louis’s oldest scrapbooks, and a humorous excerpt from an unpublished 1955 manuscript in which Armstrong details how the players were so proud of their new uniforms that they refused to slide and lost every game!Though a Mets and Dodgers fan, the new exhibit will also feature Louis’s connections to the Yankees, namely through his manager, Joe Glaser, who was a legendary Yankee fan who attended nearly every home game. When Louis was mobbed by fans during a tour of Buenos Aires in 1957, he asked Glaser to have Yogi Berra send a catcher’s mask to protect his “chops.” Swingin’ with the All Stars includes a photo of Louis in Yogi’s mask!Swingin’ with the All Stars: Louis Armstrong & Baseball will be on exhibit now through August 31st and is free with museum admission. Remember, Louis Armstrong House Museum is just seven blocks away from Citi Field, home of the 2013 All Star Game!The Louis Armstrong House Museum is located at 34-56 107th Street in Corona, New York. The museum is open Tuesday – Friday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm and Saturday/Sunday from 12:00 noon – 5:00 pm.  Travel directions and more at www.LouisArmstrongHouse.org or 718.478.8274.  Parking is available in the neighborhood and the museum is accessible by subway via the 7 train.  Admission is $10.00, $7.00 for seniors, students and children and free LAHM members and children under 4. Groups with reservations enjoy a discount on admission. The Louis Armstrong House Museum is closed on all Mondays and the following Holidays: Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New  Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day.  It is always open on the 4th of July, in honor of Louis’s traditional birthday.Thanks to the vision and funding of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, the Louis Armstrong House Museum welcomes visitors from all over the world, six days per week, 52 weeks per year. 

Tue, 05/14/2013 - 6:09 am

The Lost Jazz Shrines series is dedicated to bringing legendary NYC jazz clubs back into the consciousness of the world with a thorough remembrance and celebration. In celebration of the resonant history of Birdland, we will examine the musical and stylistic legacy of Charlie Parker through three completely different lenses and cultural perspectives. This will be achieved through the efforts of three exceptional alto saxophonists.

Rudresh Mahanthappa will present recontextualizations of Charlie Parker’s work as well as new material based on extractions of Bird’s vocabulary as both composer and improviser. Mahanthappa's celebrated groundbreaking approach of synthesizing the traditions of jazz with modern musical concepts exemplifies the spirit of Bird. With some of NYC’s finest instrumentalists as a rhythm section, this evening will highlight the relevancy of Parker as a contemporary and timeless icon of modern music. Film screening: Celebrating Bird: The Triumph of Charlie Parker at 7PM, FREE - A revealing look at an enigmatic yet endlessly appealing man. It includes a TV appearance with Dizzy Gillespie and rare footage with jazz greats including Thelonious Monk and Louis Armstrong among others.

"Charlie Parker Place. That's my corner, just down from Bird's house, now a historic landmark in the East Village. At times I imagine hearing him practice as I go by, infusing each rhythmic step and melodic turn with his characteristic sense of exaltation. "Bluing a new cartography of flight" is how poet Arthur Brown put it. The May 31st concert will celebrate that Bird's music points us forward, combining music with the images and syntax that he and his compatriots inspired in poets, then and now." - Marty Ehrlich.

Call (212) 220 - 1460 or visit Ticketing Services (12PM - 6PM, Tue. - Sat.). Order single tickets online at www.tribecapac.org
 
BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center is located on the campus of the Borough of Manhattan Community College. A valid photo ID is required when attending an event.Performers Subject to change. 
Wed, 05/29/2013 - 9:28 am

Magnetic, Terence Blanchard’s stunning new album is set for release May 28 on Blue Note Records. The album features ten original songs written by Blanchard or a member of his quintet: saxophonist Brice Winston, pianist Fabian Almazon, bassist Joshua Crumbly, and drummer Kendrick Scott. Magnetic also showcases special guest appearances from bass legend Ron Carter, as well as label-mates saxophonist Ravi Coltrane and guitarist Lionel Loueke. Magnetic is yet another genre-defying chapter in this innovative musician and film composer's life - only to be followed June 15 by the World Premiere of Champion, an “Opera in Jazz.”  The release of Magnetic will be accompanied by tour dates worldwide including the Newport Jazz Festival in August.Magnetic is Blanchard’s first album since the critically-acclaimed 2009 album, Choices, and marks Blanchard’s return to Blue Note, which last released A Tale of God’s Will, his Grammy-winning triumphant 2007 requiem for his home city, New Orleans, in the wake of the devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina. Magnetic was produced by Blanchard, Robin Burgess and Frank Wolf and recorded at Avatar Studios in New York City. The vast array of approaches undertaken by the ensemble throughout the album is striking, from the blistering bop of “Don’t Run” to the fragile ballad “Jacob’s Ladder”; the psychedelic electronic haze of “Hallucinations” to the urgent edginess of “Another Step.” As Blanchard says, “It’s a wide range of musical ideas that come together through the efforts of the guys in the band.”On June 15th, Opera Theatre of Saint Louis and Jazz St. Louis will combine forces to premiere Blanchard’s first opera, Champion, an “Opera in Jazz” based on the story of the boxing champion Emile Griffith. Continuing their individual traditions of commissioning music that showcases the talents of the world’s best contemporary composers, Opera Theatre of Saint Louis and Jazz St. Louis have joined forces in the development of Champion, featuring a powerhouse team of writers and performers. With music by Blanchard and libretto by the Pulitzer Prize-Winning Playwright Michael Cristofer, Champion blends the uniquely American tradition of jazz with the dramatic power of opera. The opera will star Denyce Graves, Arthur Woodley, Robert Orth, Aubrey Allicock, and Meredith Arwady. Directed by Opera Theatre of Saint Louis Artistic Director James Robinson and conducted by George Manahan, Champion will receive its world premiere June 15-30 as part of Opera Theatre’s 2013 Festival Season. Champion follows his recent score for Emily Mann’s Broadway production of Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire.UPCOMING LIVE APPEARANCESMAY5/29- 6/2 – Jazz Standard, New York, NY – QuintetJUNE6/12-6/13 – Whitaker Music Festival, St.Louis, MO 6/15 – Champion, An Opera in Jazz, St.Louis, MO  6/19 – Champion, An Opera in Jazz, St. Louis, MO 6/21 - Champion, An Opera in Jazz, St. Louis. MO 6/22- Christian Brothers Academy, Lincroft, NJ6/28 – Tanglewood Jazz Festival, Tanglewood, MA 6/30 - Champion, An Opera in Jazz, St. Louis. MOJULY7/7 – Love Supreme, London, England 7/8 Brick in the Wall  Manchester England7/11 New Morning, Paris, France7/12 – North Sea Jazz Festival, Rotterdam, Holland7/13 Copenhagen, Denmark7/14 Perugia Festival, Perugia, Italy7/16 – Bohemia Jazz Festival, Liberec, Czech Republic7/17 Bossano, Italy7/18- Almunecar Jazz festival, Almunecar, Spain 7/19 – Torrente Jazz Festival, Torrente, Spain7/21 Madrid, Spain 7/26 – Lensic Arts Center, Santa Fe, NM with Special Guest Lionel Loueke7/27-7/28  Dazzle Jazz Club  Denver, CO7/30-7/31  Hollywood Bowl  Los Angeles, CA  with Dr. John  AUGUST8/1  The Music Hall  Portsmouth, NH8/2  Sculler's Jazz Club  Boston, MA8/3  Newport Jazz Festival  Newport, RI With special guest Lionel Loueke8/8-8/11  Blues Alley  Washington, DC 8/11  Richmond Jazz Festival  Richmond, Virginia 8/19-8/24  Dinaledi Stage  Johannesburg, S. Africa with Special Guest Lionel Loueke

Thu, 05/30/2013 - 8:37 am

NYC’s summer concert season just got very cool with the Hot Jazz / Cool Garden 2013. Three hot NYC jazz bands will play in Louis’s Garden this summer: Bria’s Hot Five with Bria Skonberg on July 4th – Louis Armstrong’s birthday, Jon-Erik Kellso and the EarRegulars on July 20th and Peter & Will Anderson Sextet on August 17th.  Each concert is at 2:00 pm. Concerts include complimentary red beans n’ rice (Louis’s favorite recipe) & sweet tea. And, since Louis always celebrated his birthday on July 4th birthday cake will be served during the Fourth of July event to celebrate!For the first time, the museum has launched advance ticket sales for this series. All advance tickets include a Historic House Tour pass (good for 6 months).  Advance single tickets are $18. A series subscription is available for $45 and includes reserved VIP seats.  Tickets at the door are $20. Advance tickets can only be purchased online at LouisArmstrongHouse.org. Meet the Bands:On Thursday, July 4th Bria’s Hot Five with Bria Skonberg will perform with Adrian Cunningham, reeds; Sean Cronin, bass; Darrian Douglas, drums; and Dalton Ridenhour, piano.  Hailing from Chilliwack, BC, and now living in New York City, award winning trumpeter/vocalist/ composer Bria Skonberg is "poised to be one of the most versatile and imposing musicians of her generation." She recently earned a 2013 Jazz Journalists’ Association nomination for “Up and Coming Jazz Artist of The Year.”On Saturday, July 20th Jon-Erik Kellso and The EarRegulars perform.  Since moving to New York City in 1989 to join Vince Giordano's Nighthawks, trumpeter Jon-Erik Kellso has enjoyed performing concerts and festivals all over the world with many of jazz greats, as well as co-leading The EarRegulars with guitarist Matt Munisteri at the Ear Inn on Sunday nights since 2007. He recently played a week at Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola with Wynton Marsalis' Louis Armstrong Continuum.  In addition to Kellso and Munisteri, The EarRegulars will also feature Harvey Tibbs on trombone and Vince Giordano (featured on HBO’s Boardwalk Empire) on bass.The Peter and Will Anderson Sextet perform on Saturday, August 17th, featuring the two Juilliard-educated masters of the clarinet and saxophone. They will be bringing along trumpeter Jon-Erik Kellso, pianist Ehud Asherie, bassist Clovis Nicolas and drummer Phil Stewart. “Virtuosos on clarinet and saxophone” (New York Times) and “Remarkable” (Wall Street Journal), identical twins Peter and Will Anderson have distinguished themselves as top-level jazz players and composers in New York City. Their recent CD, Correspondence, has been garnering rave reviews. “They’re two young men who seem to have been implanted with a lifetime of experience at birth,” Marc Myers wrote in a review of the CD. “Now they have jazz world by the tail. It will be interesting to see how they swing it.” About the Louis Armstrong House Museum:The Louis Armstrong House Museum is located at 34-56 107th Street in Queens, New York. The museum is open Tuesday – Friday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm and Saturday/Sunday from 12:00 noon – 5:00 pm.  Travel directions and more at LouisArmstrongHouse.org or 718.478.8274. Currently on exhibit: Swingin’ with the All Stars: Louis Armstrong & Baseball now through August 31st and is free with museum admission. Parking is available in the neighborhood and the museum is accessible by subway via the 7 train. Thanks to the vision and funding of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, the Louis Armstrong House Museum welcomes visitors from all over the world, six days per week, 52 weeks per year.

Thu, 05/30/2013 - 12:23 pm

The National Jazz Museum in Harlem continues to offer a wide range of top quality free programming and affordable concerts from jazz’s most celebrated musicians, educators and historians. May was an exciting month for us with the launch of our Parallax Conversation Series and two Harlem Speaks poetry slams! We continue with fresh programming this June as we draw inspiration from the current Gordon Parks exhibit at the Studio Museum in Harlem to bring you a series on polymaths in the jazz world and a blowout interactive concert at the end of the month!Harlem Speaks, our flagship public program of oral histories, is honored to have a true veteran of jazz, and one of its most in-demand sideman, multi-reedman Jerry Dodgion,  who has performed and recorded with the likes of Herbie Hancock, Benny CarterRed NorvoBenny Goodman, Marian McPartland among many others.This month’s Jazz For Curious Listeners focuses on the Gordon Parks’s of right now, meaning polymaths who are professional jazz musicians and then some. These Renaissance men and women also split their time as scientists, photographers, and --- in addition to making great contributions to the music we love. The sessions wrap up with Hank O’Neal discussing the extra-photography work of Gordon Parks- did you know he was also a prolific composer?This May the museum launched the new Parallax Conversation Series. Parallax is defined as “the effect whereby the position or direction of an object appears to differ when viewed from different positions.” For this next installment of the Parallax Conversation series inspired by the “A Harlem Family 1967” Gordon Parks exhibit at the Studio Museum in Harlem, we are bringing two artists whose work centers on combatting negative portrayals of Harlem and African Americans.This month offers several opportunities for live music with our packed Harlem in the Himalayas series at the Rubin Museum of art with Romanian pianist-composer Lucian Ban and US violist Mat Maneri, bassist Gary Peacock and pianist Marilyn Crispell and Norway’s Christian Wallumrod Ensemble. Tuesday, June 4, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersPolymaths: ADEMOLA OLUGEBEFOLA7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: The National Jazz Museum in Harlem(104 East 126th Street, Suite 2C)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                 This month’s Jazz For Curious Listeners are inspired by the “A Harlem Family 1967” Gordon Parks exhibit at the Studio Museum in Harlem. We are presenting four polymaths who lives have a significant intersection between jazz and other interests.Ademola Olugebefola is a renowned contemporary artist whose work has set standards of innovative excellence. Widely collected and published in hundreds of books, catalogs, magazines and newspapers, his work has also been featured in major museums, universities, galleries and on television in the USA, the Caribbean, Africa, Europe and Japan. His  paintings, graphics and mixed media work is shown extensively on the internet. Born in the US Virgin Islands and raised in New York City, Ademola has expanded his national exhibitions to New York State’s mid Hudson Valley over the last few years. TransArt has presented his work in Newburg, Kingston and has presented his major 5 acre environmental art as part of Jazz In The Valley. In a career that spans three decades, Ademola feels these 5 acre environmental art installations Nature Symphony and MAMBO: A Tribute to Tito Puente, in concert with the music, is a portal to new spiritual and creative frontiers.Among a spectrum of recent art, culture and special projects activity, Albany International Airport hosted his paintings and a lecture as part of a landmark exhibition in October 2000. In June 2001  Poughkeepsie’s Albert Shahinian Gallery presented Olugebefola and painter Helen Douglas in a critically acclaimed exhibition. Recent solo exhibitions and educational presentations include: IRADAC at City College; Vassar College, Poughkeepsie NY; CHI Gallery in Oakland, California; Rush Arts in Chelsea, NY; and recent group shows at Fire Patrol #5 Art and Gallery X in Harlem and Danny Simmon’s Corrider Gallery in Brooklyn. And his most recent multimedia solo shows Blues And The Abstract Truth and Goddesses and Gurus: Earth, Wind and Fire April 2005 at Savacou Gallery in the east village, are highlights of his recent work over the last few years. Having just returned from Salvador, Bahia and Rio deJaniero Brazil in February 2005 Ademola will be seen as part of a Caribbean region PBS special documentary on similarities in Brazilian culture, the British and US Virgin Islands where he was born. Friday, June 7, 2013 Harlem in the Himalayas                                                                         Lucian Ban and Mat Maneri7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$20/Door $18/Advance | For more information: rmanyc.org The album Transylvanian Concert marks an ECM debut for Romanian pianist-composer Lucian Ban and a welcome return for US violist Mat Maneri, in his 9th appearance for the label. Part of the ECM CD Release Concert Mini-Series Transylvanian Concert marks an ECM debut for Romanian pianist-composer Lucian Ban and a welcome return for US violist Mat Maneri, in his 9th appearance for the label. The album documents a spontaneously organized performance in Targu Mures, in the region where Lucian Ban grew up. A large, highly-attentive audience follows Ban and Maneri through a program of their self-penned ballads, blues, hymns and abstract improvisations, plus Mat’s chilling solo performance of the spiritual "Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen," the whole informed by the twin traditions of jazz and European chamber music. Rain, drumming upon the stained-glass windows of the Culture Palace, offers occasional melancholy commentary. In all, a uniquely compelling set.Tuesday, June 11, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersPolymaths: Tom Artin7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: The National Jazz Museum in Harlem(104 East 126th Street, Suite 2C)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300   This month’s Jazz For Curious Listeners are inspired by the “A Harlem Family 1967” Gordon Parks exhibit at the Studio Museum in Harlem. We are presenting four polymaths who lives have a significant intersection between jazz and other interests.Tom Artin was born in 1938 in Bloomington, Indiana, the youngest son of a prominent mathematician.  In 1946, the family moved to Princeton, NJ, where his father joined the mathematics faculty of the University.  In the heady academic atmosphere of this family, it was expected that he would pursue a similar career path.Following graduation from Princeton High School in 1956, he did in fact enter Princeton University as a freshman, and took a B.A. degree in English in 1960.  He taught secondary school English for several years, before returning to Princeton to take a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature, with a concentration in medieval literature.  His first major teaching job after graduate school was at Swarthmore College, where he was a member of the English Department for four years.  His primary field of expertise there was Chaucer, though he also taught a course in the theory of poetry.  He continued his career in college teaching until 1979, the year he was granted tenure at SUNY Rockland Community College, when he resigned to take up a career as a full-time jazz trombonist.He continued to pursue his scholarly interests, which now included the operas of Richard Wagner.  He wrote “The Wagner Complex,” which was published last year, joining several other scholarly books on his resume, along with “Earth Talk:  Independent Voices on the Environment,” a journalistic report of the 1972 U.N. Conference on the Human Environment.  He has also published a volume of poetry:  “Ephemera and Other Poems.”Tom had begun playing jazz in Junior High School in a band organized by the now celebrated American composer John Harbison.  When he was a sophomore in high school, he was recruited by an undergraduate jazz band at Princeton University, with which in the summer of 1955 he made a tour of Europe.  Since then, he has played throughout the U.S. and Europe with a number of world renowned jazz groups including the Smithsonian Jazz Repertory Ensemble (1981-84), the Louis Armstrong Alumni All-Stars, the World of Jelly Roll Morton, the World's Greatest Jazz Band, and Wild Bill Davison.  He played lead trombone in Mel Tormé's big band, recorded live at Michael's Pub in New York, and has played with Bob Wilber's Benny Goodman revival big band.  Festival credits include Kool Jazz in New York and Baltimore, the Illinois Jazz Festival, the North Carolina Jazz Festival, the Atlanta Jazz Party, the Guinness Jazz Festival in Ireland, the Floating Jazz Festival aboard the S.S. Norway, The Lugano Jazz Festival and the Ascona Jazz Festival, both in Switzerland.  For about five years he was the house trombonist at Eddie Condon's in New York, having inherited the seat of his childhood idol, Vic Dickenson. In 1994, he performed at the White House for the annual Christmas Congressional Ball.  In 1999, he appeared as guest artist at Rome's celebrated jazz club Alexanderplatz.  Beginning in 2006, he has appeared regularly as guest artist with John Harbison at the Token Creek Chamber Music Festival.  He has played on movie and television soundtracks, and appears on numerous recordings.Another childhood passion that Tom took up again professionally in later years was photography.  His subjects range from landscapes, seascapes and cityscapes to portraits, florals and still lifes.  He also does a significant amount of commercial photography for both print and the web.  Artin began taking, developing and printing images in the early 1950s.The majority of Artin’s photographs originate as medium format images shot on film with vintage Rolleiflexes and a Hasselblad, though he also works with 4"x5" and 8"x10" view cameras.  In recent years, he has added digital cameras to his toolbox.  In the digital lightroom, he processes images scanned from negatives and transparencies in Photoshop, and prints onto water-color type papers via Conetech Piezography, a Quad-tone digital black and white printing process developed for the Epson inkjet printers.In the 1950’s Artin outfitted his own dedicated dark-room at home, and devoted his high school senior chemistry project to the chemistry of photography, which included fabricating and printing on his own photographic paper. In 1956, he worked as photographic assistant to William Vandivert, staff photographer for Life and Time magazines, and one of the founders of Magnum.  Tom’s photographic career ran in parallel with a career as medieval scholar and college teacher, and then as a professional jazz musician.  He has had numerous solo exhibitions, both in the U.S. and in Germany.  Many of his images have been printed and are distrusted as posters by McGaw Graphics.  Most recently, he has published “March On!,” a book of his photographs of the August 28, 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Thursday, June 13, 2013 Parallax Conversation SeriesIlene Squires (photographer) and Andre Woolery (mixed media artist)7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: The National Jazz Museum In Harlem,104 East 126th Street, Suite 2CFREE | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                                Parallax: noun- The effect whereby the position or direction of an object appears to differ when viewed from different positions.For this next installment of the Parallax Conversation series inspired by the “A Harlem Family 1967” Gordon Parks exhibit at the Studio Museum in Harlem, we are bringing two artists whose work centers on combatting negative portrayals of Harlem and African Americans. Join us as we throw these two into the ring to riff on Harlem, the visual arts, jazz, Gordon, it all fair game! Get to know the participants:Trained at the International Center of Photography, Ilene came to a career behind the lens after a studious tenure in Education Reform via Teach For America. Naturally easy around children and families, Ilene’s true niche is the photographic essay. Capturing the essence of time and place has become a huge influence on her body of work, specifically her current project on the re-gentrification of Harlem entitled, Faces of Harlem. Ilene shares her time between Harlem and Los Angeles.www.ilenesquiresphotography.comAndre Woolery was born in 1981 in New Jersey and  studied at Duke University in North Carolina. As a self-taught artist he began painting in 2009 and since 2011,  his work has been exhibited within New York City. This  has included recent participation in the eMerge: Danny  Simmons and Artists on the Cusp Group Show and Art in  Flux Show in Harlem, NY; a solo exhibition at the  FrontRunner Gallery in Manhattan, NY and BIT  Conference at SXSW in Austin, TX. His street art can be found at various locations in Harlem, NY and St. Ann’s  Bay, Jamaica. Andre Woolery lives and works in Harlem, NY.  www.andrewooleryart.com Friday, June 14, 2013 Harlem in the Himalayas                                                                         Gary Peacock and Marilyn Crispell7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$20/Door $18/Advance | For more information: rmanyc.orgWith their shared sense of lyricism, their individual compositional styles and their profound background in free playing, Peacock and Crispell are exceptional musical partners. The album Azure features beautiful duets by two great improvisers whose compatibility, though undocumented until now, has been proven through an extensive history. Tuesday, June 18, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersPolymaths: Scott Robinson7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: The National Jazz Museum in Harlem(104 East 126th Street, Suite 2C)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300This month’s Jazz For Curious Listeners are inspired by the “A Harlem Family 1967” Gordon Parks exhibit at the Studio Museum in Harlem. We are presenting four polymaths who lives have a significant intersection between jazz and other interests.One of today's most wide-ranging instrumentalists, Scott Robinson has played tenor sax with Buck Clayton's band,  trumpet with Lionel Hampton's quintet,  alto clarinet with Paquito D'Rivera's clarinet quartet, and  bass sax with the New York City Opera. On these and other instruments including theremin and ophicleide, he has been heard with a cross-section of jazz's greats representing nearly every imaginable style of the music, from Braff to Braxton. Scott has been heard numerous times on film, radio and television, and his discography now includes more than 200 recordings. His releases as a leader have garnered five-star reviews from Leonard Feather, Down Beat Magazine and other sources worldwide, and have appeared in many "Best of  Year" lists. Scott's collaborators on disc have included Frank Wess, Hank Jones, Joe Lovano, Ron Carter, and Bob Brookmeyer, and he has been a member of Maria Schneider's Orchestra for twenty years.A busy traveller, Scott has performed in some fifty nations  in such diverse and prestigious venues as Carnegie Hall, the Village Vanguard, and the Vienna Opera House, and has served as Artist-In-Residence at festivals in Italy, Hungary, Germany and Denmark. His performances for dignitaries worldwide have included a U.S. Presidential Inauguration and a command performance honoring the birthday of the king of Thailand. In 2001 Scott was selected by the US State Department to be a Jazz Ambassador, completing an eight-week, eleven-country tour of West Africa performing his arrangements of the compositions of Louis Armstrong (later featured on his CD Jazz Ambassador). Scott has also written magazine articles and liner notes, and was an invited speaker at the Congressional Black Caucus Jazz Forum in Washington, D.C. Scott and his unusual instruments have been profiled in books by Nat Hentoff, Royal Stokes and others, and on CNN news, and he has been recognized with multiple fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, DownBeat, and the Jazz Journalists Association.Scott's many works as a composer cover a very wide range, from solo performance pieces, jazz tunes and songs, and chamber works such as his Immensities for Large Instruments, on up to large-scale compositions for wind band, symphony orchestra, and even combined orchestras. A recent CD featured twelve compositions based on 1930s Doc Savage pulp adventure novels.Under the auspices of his new company, ScienSonic Laboratories, Scott has constructed a studio/laboratory for sonic research, containing an astonishing assortment of instruments and devices. Five highly creative and far-reaching projects have so far been released, with many more on the way including collaborations with Roscoe Mitchell, Marshall Allen and Henry Grimes. In 2012, ScienSonic's recordings were certified by the Space Foundation as Certified Space Imagination Products, entitled to bear the Foundation's certification seal.In addition to his many musical activities such as performing, composing and educating, Scott has many outside interests which inform his work. He is a passionate collector of 1950s and 1960s science fiction cover paintings by noted artist Richard Powers, and has secured exclusive rights from the estate to use these works on his ScienSonic CD covers. He is both a collector and restorer of antique instruments, and has brought many silent treasures back to life. A devoted enthusiast of lighter-than-air flight who once travelled to Friedrichshafen, Germany to ride aboard the new Zeppelin, Scott maintains an "Airship Room" in his house which is full of artifacts including a postcard mailed on the Hindenburg in 1936, and actual remnants of the Akron, Shenandoah, and Graf Zeppelin airships. Scott also enjoys camping, fishing, gardening, skywatching, making things out of wood, and brewing beer in the basement of his Teaneck, NJ home.Thursday, June 20th, 2013 Harlem SpeaksJerry Dodgion, Saxophone6:30-8:30Location: The National Jazz Museum in Harlem(104 East 126th Street, Suite 2C)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                               Jerry Dodgion is a musician’s musician, a multi-woodwind master who in the course of his six-decade career, has been a first-call player for hundreds of classic projects. Among the countless number of musical associations that Dodgion has had throughout the years were with Gerald Wilson, Benny CarterRed NorvoBenny GoodmanOliver Nelsonthe Thad Jones/Mel Lewis OrchestraHerbie HancockDuke PearsonCount Basie, and Marian McPartland among many others. We’re thrilled to have Jerry join us for our oral history series and we hope to see you there as he gives a unique insight into the music world. Friday, June 21, 2013 Make Music New York DayWord Beyond Jazz Trio and the Lucky Chops Brass Band1:00 – 4:00pmLocation: The National Jazz Museum in Harlem(104 East 126th Street, Suite 2C)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300Come visit the museum this Friday for live music all afternoon as part of Make Music New York Day. MMNY, “the largest music event ever to grace Gotham” (Metro New York), is a unique festival of free concerts in public spaces throughout the five boroughs of New York City, all on June 21st, the first day of summer. MMNY takes place simultaneously with similar festivities in more than 514 cities around the world — a global celebration of music making and this year we have the Words Beyond trio and the Lucky Chops Brass Band bringing their bright sounds to the Visitors Center. We might even spill on to the streets- come by to find out! Friday, June 21, 2013 Harlem in the Himalayas                                                                         Christian Wallumrød Ensemble7:00pmLocation: Rubin Museum of Art(150 West 17th Street)$20/Door $18/Advance | For more information: rmanyc.org Part of the ECM CD Release Concert Mini-Series The ensemble of Christian Wallumrød continues to evolve in its own idiosyncratic way on the new album Outstairs. By now, Wallumrød’s compositional signature is instantly recognizable. Nobody else writes pieces like this – multi-dimensional chamber music inspired by the sonorities of Norwegian folk and church music, influenced by early music and the post-Cage avant-garde, and liberated by jazz’s freedom of thought. This time around, the ensemble members share the arranging credits between them, making the music still more organic and flexible as new sound combinations emerge.With Christian Wallumrød on piano, harmonium, and toy piano, Eivind Lønning on trumpet, Gjermund Larsen on violin, hardanger fiddle, and viola, Espen Reinertsen on tenor saxophone, Tove Törngren on cello, Per Oddvar Johansen on drums and vibraphone. Tuesday, June 25, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersPolymaths: Hank O’Neal on Gordon Parks7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: The National Jazz Museum in Harlem(104 East 126th Street, Suite 2C)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300  This month’s Jazz For Curious Listeners are inspired by the “A Harlem Family 1967” Gordon Parks exhibit at the Studio Museum in Harlem. We are presenting four polymaths who lives have a significant intersection between jazz and other interests. As a child in Texas, Hank O’Neal first experienced photography when he watched his father print his World War II photographs and family portraits in a kitchen darkroom. A few years later, in 1952, he won a Brownie Hawkeye in a drawing at a small grocery store and began taking and processing his own pictures. Child in Spacesuit, 1953, is a product of those times.Twenty years later, in 1973, O’Neal had a better camera, his first book, The Eddie Condon Scrapbook of Jazz, was published, and he had his first modest photography show, Winona, Texas, at The Open Mind Gallery, an appropriately modest establishment in the soon to blossom Soho district of New York City. By then, photography had become a serious avocation, and during that period O’Neal formed lasting friendships and working relationships with such noted photographers as Berenice Abbott, Andre Kertesz, all the living Farm Security Administration photographers and many others. Additionally, he came to know many dealers, critics, and curators interested in the art of photography, particularly Lee Witkin and those associated with his gallery, as well as Harry Lunn. His relationship with The Witkin Gallery continued until it ceased operation in 1999, and with Harry Lunn until his death in 1998. More recently he has been associated with Howard Greenberg.In 1972, O’Neal met Berenice Abbott and began a working relationship with her that lasted nineteen years. It was Abbott who convinced him of the merits of a large format view camera, suggesting that if he’d buy one, she’d teach him how to work it. He did and she did, in an abbreviated thirty-minute session. About the same time, Bert Stern suggested there was equal merit in medium format cameras and gave O’Neal a spare Rolleiflex to prove the point. No lesson was involved.Now, equipped with a Leica, Nikon, Rolleiflex, and Deardorff, O’Neal began to take serious photographs. His visual boundary was provided by a conversation with John Vachon, who told him, "I knew I would only photograph what pleased or astonished my eye, and in the way I wanted to see it," and this sounded like a fine philosophy. Abbott provided the intellectual boundary, when she admonished O’Neal, saying, "Don’t take photographs willy-nilly, you have to have a project."Walker Evans added another point, when he told O’Neal, "It doesn’t count unless you find it yourself." He paid attention to all three of these fine artists and for the next four decades followed their advice, accumulating a large body of work in the process. O’Neal has constantly discovered subjects he feels to be visually astonishing, and has integrated them into various projects. Except for those photographs taken for a specific assignment or publication, until his major one-man show at The Witkin Gallery, he elected to keep most of his work private. Since the Witkin retrospective, he has shown and published his work with increasing regularity.Many of O’Neal’s photographs are often work-related, portraits for LP jackets and CD booklets, documenting recording sessions, illustrating books or producing booklets for his music festivals. Since 1971, he has produced over 200 LPs or CDs for his companies, Chiaroscuro Records and Hammond Music Enterprises. Since 1983, he and his partner, Shelley Shier have produced over one hundred music festivals, through their New York City-based production company, HOSS, Inc. Along the way, O’Neal has also published a number of books and monographs, including the now classic work on the Farm Security Administration, A Vision Shared – A Portrait of America and Its People 1935 – 1943 and the landmark study of his friend, Berenice Abbott – American Photographer. His own photographs appeared in a variety of books and publications, the award-winning book, The Ghosts of Harlem in 1997, to be reissued in 2008), Hank O’Neal Portraits 1971 – 2000, and in 2006, Gay Day – The Golden Age of the Christopher Street Parade. One of his more unusual accomplishments was producing a series of photographs that accompanied a special Limited Editions Club edition of Robert Penn Warren’s All The King’s Men. A special portfolio of these gravure prints was issued along with the book.O’Neal has produced a wide ranging body of work, portraits of friends and associates, ironic images fromany parts of the world, and continually added to projects that have lasted two or three decades. Examples of his work may be seen in the photo section of hankoneal.com. The many illustrated books can be seen in the book section of hankoneal.com.In addition to the musical and photographic interests, O’Neal’s other activities are as varied as the subject matter of his photographs. He received a BA from Syracuse University in 1962, and was well on his way to an MA, when, in 1963, he was snared by the Central Intelligence Agency, with whom he was associated until 1976. While he was with this organization, he also served on active duty in the US Army, rising to the rank of Captain. O’Neal came to New York City from Washington, D.C. in 1967 and still resides in Greenwich Village. He joined the faculty of The New School University in 1970 and remains affiliated with that school as a member of the Board of Advisors of the Jazz and Contemporary Music Program. For the decade of the 1970s, he was associated with the modern dance company, Choreographer’s Theater, for whom he not only created sound and visual collages, but also, on occasion, danced. In the same decade, he built and operated two recording studios in Greenwich Village. During the years 1983 through 1995, he was an advisor to the Justice Department and is currently on the Board of Directors of various arts organizations, galleries and corporations, most prominently the Jazz Foundation of America/Jazz Musician’s Emergency Fund, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem and The Jazz Gallery. Thursday, June 27th, 2013 Special EventThe National Jazz Museum in Harlem and the Studio Museum in Harlem Present: The NJMH Allstars play Gordon Parks7:00-9:00pmLocation: The Studio Museum in Harlem144 West 125th Street (Btwn Lenox and 7th Ave)General Admission $20, Studio Museum Members $15 | For more information: 212-348-8300 June’s Gordon Parks-inspired programming culminates in an evening of exciting improvisation on his “A Harlem Family 1967” exhibit at the Studio Museum in Harlem. Join the National Jazz Museum in Harlem All-Stars band for an interactive concert as they perform a selection of photographs from the collection. Come see if you can identify the sound of a sleeping child, a busy Harlem street corner, a family at their kitchen table and more! Tickets will be on sale through the Studio Museum website at www.studiomuseum.org.

Thu, 06/27/2013 - 9:10 am

The National Jazz Museum in Harlem continues to offer a wide range of top quality free programming and affordable concerts from jazz’s most celebrated musicians, educators and historians. June’s focus on Gordon Parks brought in a fascinating array of contemporary jazz polymaths for the Jazz For Curious Listeners series and we sparked new discussion on the Harlem Arts community and representations of African Americans in art with the third installment of our Parallax Conversation Series. This month's Jazz For Curious Listeners events reach across the world, highlighting the connections jazz between Arab, Israeli, North African, and Spanish musical traditions. We are making a strong case against the artificial divisions that stop us from hearing what these great traditions share with jazz. Join us as we delve into the connections between Jewish and North African music with Nadav Remez and his work with the New Jerusalem Orchestra, explore the Arab musical tradition as transplanted to New York City with Sami Abu Shumays, and hear Middle Eastern, Israeli and Latin inspired jazz with Alon Nechushtan.The fourth installment of the Parallax Conversation Series continues on the same theme of musical unity with what promises to be a scintillating conversation between Spanish Flamenco singer Alfonso Cid and Israeli trumpeter-composer Itamar Borochov. They have both collaborated with a Jewish-Moroccan linguist so with this as a jumping off point we hope you’ll come along for our Pan-Arab, Pan-African, Spanish conversation right here in Harlem!Our Harlem Speaks guest this month, David Chevan has long been championing and creating new music with his work as co-founder of the Afro-Semitic Experience- an ensemble dedicated to preserving, promoting and expanding the rich cultural and musical heritage of the Jewish and African diaspora. Come listen to him discuss and share examples of how these traditions overlap. Tuesday, July 2, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersNadav Remez7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: The National Jazz Museum in Harlem(104 East 126th Street, Suite 2C)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300 Israeli-born guitarist Nadav Remez is one of today’s emerging voices on the NYC Jazz scene, and his music is gaining the attention of both fans and music critics worldwide. His melodic abilities on the guitar have been described as “haunting”, and his music as an intriguing combination of modern Jazz, Alternative Rock and Jewish Folk. Join us as he discusses his career and plays selections of his projects that highlight the connections between his Israeli and jazz musical style.Nadav is a graduate of Berklee College of Music and New England Conservatory. His latest CD, “So Far” was released on Brooklyn Jazz Underground Records and has been critically acclaimed (4-stars on Jazzwise). Nadav has collaborated with some of today’s leading figures in Jazz: Omer Avital, Greg Tardy, Jason Lindner, Myron Walden and Jamey Haddad, to name a few, at some of the world’s largest jazz festivals, including Montreux Jazz Festival, Bologna Jazz Festival, Atlanta Jazz Festival, and Palatia Jazz FestiTuesday, July 9, 2013 Jazz for Curious ListenersNew Jerusalem Orchestra- Eternal Love (“Ahavat Olamim) hosted by Nadav Remez 7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: Maysles Cinema(343 Lenox Avenue between 127th & 128th)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300    The New Jerusalem Orchestra (NJO) is a world-class musical ensemble dedicated to creating new music that draws on African and Middle Eastern musical traditions, including Middle Eastern piyyut (Jewish traditions of sacred music), and is informed by a sophisticated and joyous jazz sensibility. The film, "Eternal Love," documents a spirited and moving live performance from the 2010 Israel Festival, featuring the virtuoso musician, gifted bandleader and founding member of the NJO, the bassist Omer Avital, together with the celebrated saxophonist, Greg Tardy, and the master of Moroccan piyyut, Rabbi Haim Louk.  Thursday, July 11th, 2013 Special Event: The Jazz and Democracy Project with Wes Watkins6:30-8:30Location: The National Jazz Museum in Harlem(104 East 126th Street, Suite 2C)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300                                                                               The Jazz & Democracy Project manifests a hypothesis that Wesley J. Watkins, IV, Ph.D. has been investigating since he was an undergraduate: a music-centered curriculum with genuine links to the other subject areas can increase student identification with school, impact academic engagement, and have a subsequent positive effect on overall academic success among students who have an affinity for music. “Dr. Wes,” as his students now call him, first proposed such a curriculum as part of the Stanford University School of Education Undergraduate Honors Program. The key ingredient, Dr. Wes hypothesized, is genuine connections to the other subject areas. That is, having students create a rap to memorize their history lesson is one way to integrate music, but integration can occur at much deeper levels when the arts content in some way mirrors or demonstrates core concepts from social studies, literature, science, or mathematics. Such is the depth of integration found in The Jazz & Democracy Project: to learn about the jazz process is to learn about the democratic process.Dr. Wes is an avid music lover—especially Jazz and Latin Jazz—who enjoys interviewing and writing about his favorite artists. Beginning in 2003, Dr. Wes operated “The List”—first an e-mail notification and then a blog—that educated the public about great live music in the Bay Area. In 2009, Dr. Wes began posting his interviews with top musicians, including international and local stars Poncho SanchezRebeca Mauleón and Marcus Shelby, as well as world renowned masters Horacio “El Negro” Hernández and Ahmad Jamal. In April, 2009, he began hosting the We’re Talkin’ Jazz series of pre-concert talks at The Jazz Heritage Center. In partnership with the San Francisco Yoshi’s this series opened with a sold-out interview with Terence Blanchard, followed by interviews with Rachelle FerrellPat MartinoTony LindsayJacky Terrasson, and Mike Stern with Randy Brecker.To learn more visit www.jazzanddemocracy.com.Tuesday, July 16, 2013Jazz for Curious ListenersSami Abu Shumays 7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: The National Jazz Museum in Harlem(104 East 126th Street, Suite 2C)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300  In our efforts to illuminate the musical continuities within the Middle East and draw out the region’s relationship to jazz, we are thrilled to have  Palestinian-American violinist Sami Abu Shumays as part of Jazz For Curious Listeners to discuss how his musical career fits and reflects contemporary New York City.  Originally a composer and scholar of Western Classical music, he began studying Arabic violin with renowned Arabic violinist and oud player Simon Shaheen in New York, where he concurrently pursued graduate studies in composition and ethnomusicology at C.U.N.Y. after receiving his B.A. in Music from Harvard. Seeking a deeper immersion in Arab musical culture, Sami studied in Cairo, Egypt on a Fulbright fellowship, with Dr. Alfred Gamil, and continued his studies in Aleppo, Syria, with Mohammed Qasas, Abdel-Basit Bakkar, and Abdel-Minaim Senkary–experiences that led him to devote himself to Arabic music.                                                                                                                                                         Thursday July 18th, 2013Harlem SpeaksDavid Chevan6:30-8:30Location: The National Jazz Museum in Harlem(104 East 126th Street, Suite 2C)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300 As co-founder of the Afro-Semitic Experience, Jewish-American jazz bassist David Chevan is a perfect fit for Harlem Speaks with his extensive study on the connections  between Jewish and African American sacred traditions. When the group was first formed they collaborated on a mission statement: “The Afro-Semitic Experience is an ensemble dedicated to preserving, promoting and expanding the rich cultural and musical heritage of the Jewish and African diaspora.”Bassist and composer, David Chevan was born in Philadelphia in 1960, and grew up in Amherst, Massachusetts.  His early passion for music has led him to explore a wide range of musical realms from singing in synagogue, to playing in Gospel groups, Polka bands, Klezmer bands, and Italian wedding bands, and finally to Jazz and contemporary composition.  He has composed music for a wide range of artists and ensembles, including several collaborations with dance and film.  His most recent compositions have focused on melding jazz improvisational practice with Jewish liturgy.  In addition to performing regularly in a duo with pianist Warren Byrd and leading their group, The Afro-Semitic Experience, Chevan has had the opportunity to perform and record with, Joe Beck, Harold Danko, Mat Darriau, Jason Kao Hwang, Laura Wetzler, Giacomo Gates, Frank London, Herb Robertson, and Cookie Segelstein. He is a Professor of Music at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven and is proud to be a member of the board of trustees of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation. "Never before have I heard this lyrically powerful a fusion of Jewish and jazz souls on fire.” Nat Hentoff, The Wall Street Journal on The Afro-Semitic Experience Tuesday, July 23, 2013Parallax Conversation SeriesAlfonso Cid and Itamar Borochov7:00 – 8:30pm   Location: The National Jazz Museum in Harlem(104 East 126th Street, Suite 2C)Donation Suggested | For more information: 212-348-8300 Parallax: noun- The effect whereby the position or direction of an object appears to differ when viewed from different positions.For our fourth installment of the Parallax Conversation series we are thrilled to bring together the virtuosic, Spanish Flamenco singer, Alfonso Cid, with unique Israeli trumpeter-composer, Itamar Borochov. You might ask what these two could possibly have in common, they’ve both worked with the famous Jewish-Moroccan liturgist Rabbi Haim Louk for starters, but that’s what we hope you’ll join us to find out!More about the participants:Alfonso Cid was born and raised in Seville, the heartland of Flamenco music. His mother, an amateur singer from Triana, a Flamenco enclave in Seville, and his grandfather, an aficionado of Flamenco were his earliest influences.  He also had the opportunity of attending the activities of one the most significant Flamenco clubs in Andalusia, the Peña Flamenca Torres-Macarena since 1987. Alfonso enrolled at the Seville Conservatory in 1990 to study flute and music theory.  For the following 5 years he received a classical training. He also attended the classes at the Cristina Heeren Foundation for Flamenco Art in 2007 and 2008 in Sevilla, Spain, where he studied with maestro Paco Taranto and the new talent of Rocío Márquez and Elena Morales.In 1997 Alfonso moved to the United States, since then he is based in New York City.  He has made many guest appearances at important venues including Madison Square Garden, American Airlines Arena (Miami), Amway Center (Orlando) and Staples Center (Los Angeles) with the popular Latin artist Romeo Santos.  He had the honor of recording backing vocals in the song titled “Mi Santa” by Santos in which the great flamenco guitarist Tomatito was a featured guest artist.  He also performed at the 92 Y with singer songwriter and peace activist David Broza; Carnegie Hall’s Weill Hall, Lincoln Center Out of Doors Festival, Town Hall, London’s Royal Albert Hall and Sala Covarrubias in Mexico City to name a few.  He has worked with all of the significant artists in the flamenco ambiance through out the USA, performing and touring in the Tri-State area, Washington DC, San Francisco, Portland, OR; Chicago, Detroit, Kentucky, Toronto, Ottawa, British Columbia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, the United Kingdom and Spain. Since February of 2008 he has been teaching flamenco “cante” (flamenco song) at Flamenco Latino Studios and has given several flamenco “cante” for dance workshops at Lotus Music and Dance Studios.  That includes a series of lecture/demonstrations in 2010, 2011 and 2012 titled “El Baile Flamenco” in which he shares the structure of flamenco singing, guitar playing and choreography.  In partnership with Carlota Santa’s Flamenco Vivo Alfonso produced in 2010 “La Música Flamenca” (The Flamenco Music) for the Lincoln Center Institute.  Itamar Borochov brings a unique sound with him wherever he goes. Deeply immersed in the Jazz tradition, Borochov’s search for his personal roots resulted in an ever-expanding love for Arab and Pan- African musical sensibilities – a natural palette for a trumpeter-composer raised in Jaffa, an integrated Muslim-Jewish-Christian city.  Itamar fell in love with Jazz in his teens, and dedicated himself to its study, eventually moving to New York in 2006, to attend The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music. There he studied with Junior Mance, Charles Tolliver, Jimmy Owens, Cecil Bridgewater, Jo Chambers, and quickly gained international recognition as a young innovator on today’s Jazz scene.  Since then, Itamar has had the privilege to both perform and record with legendary artists such as Curtis Fuller, Candido Camero, Arnie Lawrence, Bobby Sanabria, Aaron Goldberg, Greg Tardy, and Omer Avital.While deeply immersed in the Jazz tradition, Borochov’s search for his personal roots resulted in an ever-expanding love the musical traditions of the Arab world. Resulting in collaborations with the great Jewish-Moroccan liturgist Rabbi Haim Louk, the world music phenomenon Debka Fantasia, The New Jerusalem Orchestra, and Israeli rock singer Dudu Tassa. In 2009, his good friends and collaborators, Ravid Kahalani and Omer Avital, invited Itamar to become a core member of the world music sensation Yemen Blues and to help build its unique sound.  Itamar Has performed in prestigious venues and festivals around the globe, such as Lincoln Center (NY), The Kennedy Center, (Washington DC), Summer Stage at Central Park (NY), Roskilde Festival (Denmark), Ethnoport Festival (Poland), and more. He has performed at music showcases such as Babel Med (France), Womex (Denmark), and International Exposure (Israel).  Nowadays, Itamar is quickly gaining international recognition as a young Jazz innovator. His music reflects on his rich global-landscape through the Jazz tradition. We can’t wait to hear where he goes next.

Sat, 07/20/2013 - 8:39 am

Carline Ray, one of the great jazz pioneers, an activist in women's rights, a performer and educator, and an active member of Saint Peter's Church, died at Isabella House in Manhattan on July 18, 2013. She was 88 years old.Carline is survived by her daughter, Catherine Russell, also a great musician, her sister Irma Sloan, and nieces, nephews, and cousins.Carline Ray was born 21 April 1925, New York City, New York, USA.Although her father, Elisha Ray, was a gifted musician, he had been unable to find steady employment in music. Even so, he played with James Reese Europe's band and was also offered work with the New York Philharmonic. Carline herself sang and played piano, and at the age of 16 entered the Juilliard School of Music, from which her father had graduated in 1925. While at Juilliard, Ray studied composition and she also first played jazz, joining Edna Smith, a fellow student and bass player, gradually becoming adept on this instrument.  In 1946, upon graduating from Juilliard, she and Smith joined the International Sweethearts Of Rhythm. In addition to playing guitar with the band, Ray also sang. In 1948, after the Sweethearts disbanded, Ray joined Erskine Hawkins And His Orchestra as a singer but also played guitar rather than simply sitting idle between vocal numbers. After the Hawkins engagement, Ray and Smith teamed up with fellow Sweetheart Pauline Braddy to form a trio that played in New York clubs, including one managed by pianist and Orchestra leader, Luis Russell, whom Ray married in 1956. At this time, Ray added the Fender bass to her growing arsenal of instruments and she and Smith would sometimes switch instruments. In addition to working with the trio, Ray also played with various other bands, in particular a Latin band led by pianist Frank Anderson.She continued to study, gaining a master's degree in voice in 1956. Throughout the next two decades Ray worked constantly, singing and playing all the instruments upon which she was proficient, in a wide variety of musical settings. In 1981 she was awarded a grant to study the acoustic bass under renowned jazzman Major Holley. Comfortably adapting to the differing demands of jazz, popular music, classics, and choral works, Ray was a complete professional, finding in music a lifetime of challenge and fulfillment. Some of her performing credits as bassist include working with Sy Oliver Orchestra, Duke Ellington Orchestra directed by Mercer Ellington, pianist/composer Mary Lou Williams, trombonist-composer Melba Liston, and singer Ruth Brown. Nevertheless, Carline met her share of the prejudice that greets women in jazz. As she remarked to author Sally Placksin, '... I would rather be taken seriously as a musician, and the fact that I'm female - I just happen to be female, that's all'.In 2005, Carline was the recipient of the Kennedy Center’s Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Festival Award, and in 2008, she received an IWJ (International Women In Jazz) Award.Carline is also featured in the documentary film 'The Girls in the Band,' directed by Judy Chaikin and in 2013 she released her debut recording produced by her daughter Catherine Russell, Carline Ray "Vocal Sides".Carline's memorial liturgy will be held at Saint Peter's Church later this Fall where her ashes will be inurned.

Tue, 08/20/2013 - 7:08 pm

City Parks Foundation proudly announces the 21st edition of the beloved late summer jazz favorite, the Charlie Parker Jazz Festival. In the world of modern music, few figures loom as large or cast as long a shadow as saxophonist Charlie Parker, best known as “Bird” (short for “Yardbird”) to generations of musicians. He was born in 1920, and almost sixty years since his death in 1955, he is universally celebrated for single-handedly inventing bebop and bringing jazz into the modern era. The Charlie Parker Jazz Festival is an annual salute to the legendary saxophonist. City Parks Foundation is proud to produce this historic festival, and for the second year will have an expanded schedule featuring contemporaries of Charlie Parker as well as up and coming jazz musicians that continue to shape and drive the art form. This year’s festivities will begin at The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music’s Jazz Performance Space with screenings of two films important to jazz culture – “Beacons of Jazz” and “Girls in the Band.” An interactive family Jazz concert will kick off the festival’s highlight: 3 days of brilliant jazz performances in the park, including the world premiere of a newly re-commissioned “Bird is the Word.” The original piece was commissioned  by the festival in 2004, and now nearly 10 years later returns reworked for and performed by Jimmy Heath and his Big Band. This year the festival falls just days before Parker’s birthday, with performances uptown on Friday evening and Saturday afternoon in historic Harlem’s Marcus Garvey Park (in the Richard Rodgers Amphitheater), blocks from the clubs in which bebop was born; and downtown on Sunday afternoon in Tompkins Square Park, across the street from the apartment that Parker called home. Join us to learn something new about Bird, listen to artists you love, discover some new favorites, and reconnect with old friends- but most of all to ENJOY the enduring legacy of Charlie Parker and jazz in New York City. The complete Charlie Parker Jazz Festival schedule follows.  For the most up-to-date scheduling and line-up for all SummerStage programming, follow SummerStage via the below links and visit www.SummerStage.org for festival information.

Tue, 11/12/2013 - 2:15 pm

The Louis Armstrong House Museum’s Gala 2013 on December 11, 2013 will be a night to remember with a special performance by the Grammy Award-winning Vince Giordano & the Nighthawks and an impressive slate of honorees. The museum will honor Quincy Jones, Jay Hershenson, Dan Morgenstern and Grace Lawrence with the exclusive “Louie” award for their dedicated work to preserve and promote the cultural legacy of Louis Armstrong.Quincy Jones will be introduced by his friend, George Avakian, a legendary producer in his own right and the mastermind behind classic Armstrong albums such as Louis Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy and Satch Plays Fats.  Avakian himself was a Louis Armstrong House Museum Gala Honoree in 2011 and his introduction of Jones will constitute a momentous meeting of two of the most important producers in the history of 20th century music.The joint will be jumpin’ on Wednesday, December 11, 2013 at the Manhattan Penthouse, 80
Fifth Avenue in New York City.  The cocktail hour begins at 6:00 pm; dinner and the awards ceremony follow at 7:15 pm. It’s time to swing that music to support Louis’s house.For information about Gala tickets, leadership tables, and journal advertising contact Jennifer Walden Weprin at 718.997.3581, via email at Gala@LouisArmstrongHouse.org or by visiting the Museum online at LouisArmstrongHouse.org.

Sat, 01/04/2014 - 9:21 am

The Bucky Pizzarelli 88th Birthday Bash will feature 3 guitarists who have all grown up with and studied and played with the iconic Bucky Pizzarelli.Gene Bertoncini, who shared the Tonight Show Band seat with Bucky, has been a long time friend and playing partner.  Both are alumni of the great Benny Goodman sextet as well as countless recording sessions that they have been a part of. (www.genebertoncini.com)Frank Vignola, who plays with Bucky frequently has always held a special place in is heart for this master of the seven-string guitar.  Frank tours the world these days with his playing partner Vinnie Raniello and constantly wow crowds wherever they perform. (www.frankvignola.com)Ed Laub began his relationship with Bucky at the age of 16 when he became one of his first students on the 7-string guitar 46 years ago.  Today Ed and Bucky work as a duo on a steady basis whenever Bucky is not playing with his ultimate partner, his son, John Pizzarelli.  Ed provides the vocal backup to the quartet as well as Bucky's key accompanist.  A new 7 String Acoustic guitar trio CD featuring Bucky, Ed and John Pizzarelli will be released in Feb. 2014 (www.edlaub.com)John "Bucky" Pizzarelli is a world-renowned jazz guitarist who was born in Paterson, NJ on January 9, 1926. His uncles Peter and Bobby Domenick, musicians who also hailed from New Jersey, taught Bucky the guitar.His career spans over 60 years from the Vaughn Monroe Orchestra, to the Johnny Carson Tonight Show. Hundreds of jazz concerts worldwide, including White House performances with Benny Goodman, Frank Sinatra, and Claude "Fiddler" Williams, with Presidents Reagan and Clinton add to the list.Bucky has also been honored with many prestigious awards, which include the Jazz Wall of Fame by ASCAP in 2005, two honorary Doctors of Music degrees from Hamilton College in Clinton, NY and the University of Southern Illinois@ Edwardsville in 2003.  In 2002 he received the Lifetime Achievement Award for the Manhattan Association of Cabarets.  Most recently in June of 2011 Bucky was inducted into the New Jersey Hall of Fame.Last year, Bucky became one of the very first musicians in New Jersey to have two of his guitars, along with a recorded history of his lifetime in music, inducted into the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC.

Wed, 09/17/2014 - 2:15 pm

2014 Celebrates 15 years of the Django Reinhardt NY Festival which is has become a big event at Birdland and highly anticipated by the public.  The Festival Allstars tour the US twice a year at major venues and festivals such as The San Francisco Festival, The Newport Jazz Festival, The Kennedy Center, and many more.  See info below of the upcoming Fall tour.

Dorado Schmitt, legendary gypsy guitarist, has been coming to the Festival for over 10 years and along the way taught his sons, Samson, Amati, and Bronson,  the lessons of great gypsy guitar. Now they brace the Birdland stage  with their 'teacher,' ... father passing the lessons on as in gypsy manouche culture.  They come from Forbach, a gypsy community near Strasbourg in France, bringing the authenticity of the music to the NY stage.

Joining them are two favorites of the Festival, Ludovic Beier who Downbeat Magazine said of his performance at Newport this August ...'played as good a solo at Newport as was heard this year.'  The Downbeat article spoke of Samson Schmitt's lightening licks touching melodic genius..nothing short of sensational".  Pierre Blanchard on violin was also a sensation.  All this at Birdland on November 4th - 9th with Francko Mehrstein , a cousin of Dorado on rhythm guitar, and Xavier Nikq from France on bass.

The festival is produced by Pat Philips & Ettore Stratta who have  a long history with this music dating back to their many concerts and recordings with the great jazz violinist Stephane GrappelliDjango Reinhardt's partner in the Hot Club Quintette. It influenced them to launch this festival in 2000 having seen the enormous reaction to HOT JAZZ which Grappelli and Reinhardt created.  The music evolved in the 30's and 40's in France through this important musical partnership, influenced by the likes of Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong and the great American Songbook .  It took Europe by storm !

The Django Festival Allstars have been coming to America and  played alongside many of the tops in Jazz: George Benson, Joe Lovano, Paquito D'Rivera, Anat Cohen, Edmar Castaneda, Frank Wess, Lew Tabakin, Joel Frahm, and so many more.

The Festival Allstars will  embark on a major tour this fall: Oct. 24: Chicago Symphony Center, Oct. 26: Howard Theatre in Wash. DC, Oct. 31: Tilles Center for the Performing Arts/Greenvale, L.I., Nov. 1:  Paramount Theatre/ Peekskill NY,  Nov. 11: The Lobero Theatre/ Santa Barbera, Calif.,  Nov. 12:  The Ojai Arts Center, Nov. 13-16: The San Francisco Jazz Festival (4 concerts ), and  Nov. 17 Kuumwa Jazz Center before returning to Paris.  BIRDLAND, their 'home' is Nov. 4-9.

These talented artists swing like crazy and will break your heart with a ballad.  Each of them are composers and while this music can harken back to the great music of the past, their interpretations, arrangements, virtuosity, and original compositions bring a newness to Django's style and take it beyond. The Producers call it HIP HOT !...

Birdland, 315 W. 44th Street, NYC   Reservations:  212 581 3080

Full Dinner Menu, Parking Nearby
www.birdlandjazz.com

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 10:40 am

After standing ovations and rave reviews at The Newport Jazz Festival, The Django Festival Allstars return from Paris for two major tours and a week at their home, BIRDLAND on June 23 – 27 headed by lead guitarist, Samson Schmitt, gypsy from Forbach, France, son of the legendary Dorado Schmitt who will return to Birdland and for the 2nd tour in November.

Joining is Pierre Blanchard on Violin, a prodigy of Grappelli who is a sensation, and DouDou Cuillerier, monster rhythm guitarist and scat singer.  Brian Torff, who traveled the world on bass with Stephane Grappelli, holds it all together.  The Django Reinhardt NY Festival fired up a resurgence of ‘HOT JAZZ’ in the US created by the great gypsy guitarist Django Reinhardt teamed with Jazz Violin virtuoso Stephane Grappelli in the 30’s and 40’S in France.

Each night, there is a Special Jazz Guest who sits in with the band, creating a new excitement.

The tour in November will be headed by legendary guitarist/violinist   Dorado Schmitt joined by his young son, Amati, now 19, and once again by Ludovic Beier and Pierre Blanchard with French gypsy Francko Mehrstein on Rhythm and Xavier Nikq on Bass, all part of the Django Festival Allstars , the great players specially recognized by the public during the Festivals. The music is in the tradition of Django but taking it beyond - hip and hot!

November tour:

Nov. 5, 6, 7, 8: San Francisco Jazz Festival                 13: Kennedy Center Terrace Theatre
9:  Kuumbwa Jazz Center/ Santa Cruz                       14: Regatta Bar/Boston
10:  Lobero Theatre, Santa Barbara                            15: Paramount Theatre/ Peekskill
Special Guest:  Roger Kellaway                                17: 22 BIRDLAND        
11:  NJPAC/ Newark, NJ   

Tue, 06/09/2015 - 2:46 pm

It’s not summer in NYC until there is hot jazz and red beans ’n rice at the Louis Armstrong House Museum.  Louis Armstrong House Museum announces the line up for its signature summer concert series Hot Jazz / Cool Garden.  Now it its 9th season, Hot Jazz Cool / Garden features three hot NYC jazz bands in Louis’s garden: Saturday, July 4 with The Ladybugs; Saturday, July 18 with Jon-Erik Kellso & Friends; and Saturday, August 15 with Cynthia Sayer & Her Sparks Fly Quartet.
 
Meet the Bands:
 
The Ladybugs
The Ladybugs are a traditional jazz vocal group known for their intricate harmonies and experimental arrangements. Lead by Martina DaSilva, all members of the band sing while playing ukulele, guitar, trombone, bass, and drums. The Ladybugs’ repertoire includes favorites from the 1920s, ‘30s, and ‘40s, infused with old-school swing, country, and blues. The band has received high praise for recent performances at Jazz At Lincoln Center’s Generations in Jazz Festival, the NY Hot Jazz Festival, and the NYC Winter Jazzfest. With a sound that attracts all audiences, The Ladybugs effortlessly keep listeners smiling and moving.
 
Jon-Erik Kellso & Friends
At home in New York City Jon-Erik Kellso has been leading The EarRegulars featuring guitarist Matt Munisteri and various guest badasses at the Ear Inn on Sunday nights since 2007. On Mondays and Tuesdays Jon plays with Vince Giordano's Nighthawks at Iguana. Aside from these steadies, Jon can also be seen performing at all the great NYC venues, including Dizzy's, Mezzrow, Small's, Birdland, the Blue Note, the Jazz Standard, etc.
 
Recent engagements include a week in Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola with Wynton Marsalis celebrating Louis Armstrong's Hot 5s and 7s; leading the EarRegulars at the Detroit Jazz Fest and Moab Music Fest; various appearances on Garrison Keillor's "A Prairie Home Companion" live Public Radio International show, including a live cinecast to movie theaters everywhere with Elvis Costello; several jazz fest at sea cruises; concerts at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. with John Lithgow; tours of the U.S. and Japan with Ken Peplowski's Kingdom of Swing big band; annual appearances in jazz clubs and festivals in New Orleans; and jazz parties, festivals, and concerts all over the world.
 
Cynthia Sayer & Her Sparks Fly Quartet
Cynthia Sayer & Her Sparks Fly Quartet is a hot jazz quartet led by acclaimed jazz banjoist/vocalist Cynthia Sayer. Their classic jazz core pays tribute to Louis Armstrong, while their eclectic repertoire embraces many musical influences of the 1920s, ‘30s, and beyond. Comprised of top New York City musicians, Cynthia Sayer & Her Sparks Fly Quartet perform at festivals and in concert around the world. 
 
About Hot Jazz / Cool Garden:
Each concert begins at 2:00 pm at the Louis Armstrong House Museum. Advance tickets are $18 and the series subscription is $45.  Subscribers enjoy reserved VIP seats for all three concerts.  Advance tickets can be purchased online at LouisAmrstrongHouse.org. Tickets include red beans ‘n rice & sweet tea plus a complimentary historic house tour pass.  Birthday cake will be served on July 4th in honor of Louis Armstrong’s traditional birthday.  Advance tickets are suggested due to the popularity of the series. A limited number of tickets will be available at the door on a first-come bases. For more information, go to LouisArmstrongHouse.org.

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 12:11 pm

July 1, 2015 would have been Willie's 100th birthday. To honor this brilliant songwriter, producer, musician, and to celebrate his life and accomplishments, Blues Heaven Foundation is holding a free concert featuring Chicago's phenomenal blues guitarist, Melvin Taylor & the Taylor Made Band.

Willie Dixon was one of the most prolific songwriters of all time with over 500 songs to his credit.  He's been referred to as the "father of the modern Chicago blues".  His songs have been recorded by hundreds of artists across all genres - the Rolling Stones, Elvis Presley, Grateful Dead, Willie Nelson, Eric Clapton, Led Zeppelin, Tina Turner and Fleetwood Mac to name a few. Willie Dixon has been recognized by the Grammy Hall of Fame (2004), his influence in pop music was selected for preservation by the U.S. Library of Congress National Recording Registry.  Recently, June 2015, Willie Dixon was inducted in to the Songwriters Hall of Fame.

Melvin Taylor is a masterful performer, composer & producer. His extraordinary talent has taken him around the globe many times over the last 20 years. He began touring Europe at age 20 with Pinetop Perkins Legendary Blues Band. He made an immediate impact on the European circuit, and began opening for BB King for a couple of years. Melvin has performed at world class festival, theaters, held master classes at top music school and conservatories. He has 9 CD's to his credit. Please visit Melvin's website for complete history and information: www.melvintaylormusic.com

BLUES HEAVEN FOUNDATION

(Formerly Chess Records Studio)

2120 South Michigan Avenue

Chicago, IL

 

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Show Time:  5pm to 8pm

Concert in the Garden Area

Wed, 08/19/2015 - 11:46 am

City Parks Foundation is proud to announce the 22nd edition of the Charlie Parker Jazz Festival, made possible with the generous support of the Dalio Foundation. Founded in memoriam of beloved jazz musician Charlie Parker, this festival annually attracts thousands of fans to two historic parks in Manhattan. The festival will kick off the first of its three days on August 21st in Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem, blocks from the famous jazz clubs where Parker graced the stage, and move to Tompkins Square Park in the East Village on Sunday, just across the street from the late Parker’s apartment.

Prior to the launch of the festival, we invite fans to participate in a free panel hosted at The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music celebrating the musical legacy of Charlie Parker featuring two musicians participating in the shows, Oliver Lake and Rudresh Mahanthappa.

In the words of Miles Davis, “You can tell the history of jazz in four words: Louis Armstrong. Charlie Parker.” Almost sixty years after his passing, Parker is celebrated and credited for his contribution to modern music through rhythmically and melodically complex solos and his creation of the bebop sound. The acts in this year’s festival will offer a wide range of performances reflective of Parker’s music and of the ever-changing genre of jazz. From Dr. Lonnie Smith to Myra Melford, this year’s lineup will feature both jazz veterans and up-and-coming stars alike.

Come join us to celebrate Charlie Parker’s legacy – both to New York City and to the world of jazz.  

The complete Charlie Parker Jazz Festival schedule follows. For up-to-date scheduling and lineup for all SummerStage programming, follow SummerStage via the links below and visitwww.SummerStage.org

Wed, 08/26/2015 - 1:10 pm

Jazz guitar pioneer, Larry Coryell, and Kevin Mahogany, a masterful jazz vocalist, are set to headline the 2015 Amelia Island Jazz Festival, it was announced this week by AIJF Artistic Director Les DeMerle. A hugely influential guitar player, Coryell is a major figure in the jazz fusion movement of the 1970s and continues to turn out highly regarded recordings. He will appear on Friday, October 9, at the Omni Resorts Amelia Island Plantation. Veteran recording artist Kevin Mahogany, who will perform on Saturday, October 10 at the Omni, is a wide-ranging, spectacular singer who refines the jazz vocal legacies of Lambert, Hendricks & Ross, Eddie Jefferson and Al Jarreau into the myriad, interwoven dimensions of music – from gutbucket, the Great American Songbook, and gospel, to Charles Mingus to Motown.

Now in its 12th year, the AIJF will take place at various locations in Fernandina Beach, FL from October 4-11, and will kick off with its annual free concert in Amelia Park on Sunday, October 4, with U.S. Navy Band Southeast TGIF.   A new show, Jump Jive & Wail, a tribute to classic dance oriented swing music featuring the Dynamic Les DeMerle Little Big Band and gifted vocalist Bonnie Eisele, has been added to this year’s slate of events for Wednesday, October 7, at Sandy Bottoms.  Latin Jazz Night will take place in its traditional Thursday night slot, October 8, and will showcase the sizzling hot, award winning, and internationally famous Trio Caliente with their inimitable blend of Flamenco, Pop, and Brazilian Jazz, also at Sandy Bottoms.  Additionally, the always entertaining and fun late night Jazz Jams, featuring the AIJF’s 2015 musicians, will follow the headliner sets on October 9 and 10 in the Omni’s Verandah Restaurant at Racquet Park.  The festival is scheduled to end on a swinging note Sunday, October 11, with a Dixie to Swing Jazz Brunch, featuring DeMerle’s Jazztet plus Eisele with Former Ray Charles Saxophonist, Al Waters-Clarinet, Sax and Flute, at David’s Restaurant.

In addition to online, tickets may be purchased at the UPS Store, 1417 Sadler Road, in the Island Shopping Center, or at the AIFBY Chamber Of Commerce, Gateway to Amelia, A1A and Amelia Parkway.  A not for profit 501(c)(3) corporation, the Les DeMerle Amelia Island Jazz Festival, distributes proceeds toward a scholarship program to fund college educations for aspiring jazz musicians.

For more information, please contact the Festival Hotline at (904) 504-4772.  

Or visit the website:  www.ameliaislandjazzfestival.com

2015 AMELIA ISLAND JAZZ FESTIVAL SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
 
 Sunday, October 4
JAZZ IN THE PARK
Amelia Park. 2:00 - 4:00 pm
Free concert with the U.S. Navy Band Southeast, TGIF
 
Wednesday, October 7
JUMP, JIVE & WAIL
Swingin' Dance and Show
Featuring The Dynamic Les DeMerle 8-piece Little Big Band with vocalist Bonnie Eisele  
Sandy Bottoms, 7:00 - 10:00 pm
 
Thursday, October 8
LATIN JAZZ CONCERT AND DANCE
Featuring Trio Caliente, AIJF Debut
Washington D.C. award winning Latin Band Plus Special Guests
Sandy Bottoms, 7:00 - 10:00 pm
 
Friday, October 9
LARRY CORYELL, JAZZ GUITAR LEGEND IN CONCERT
Plus the Amelia Island Jazz Festival All Stars
Two Shows, 7 pm and 9 pm
Omni Resorts Hotel and Resorts, 
Includes admission to Late Night Jam Session
 
Saturday, October 10
KEVIN MAHOGANY, JAZZ VOCALIST EXTRAORDINAIRE IN CONCERT
Plus the Amelia Island Jazz Festival All Stars
Two Shows, 7 pm and 9 pm
Omni Hotel and Resorts 
Includes admission to Late Night Jam Session
 
Sunday, October 11
NEW ORLEANS STYLE MARDI GRAS JAZZ BRUNCH.
Featuring the Les DeMerle Jazztet with Former Ray Charles Saxophonist, Al Waters-Clarinet, Sax and Flute; Mike Levine-Piano; Dennis Marks-Bass;  Les DeMerle-Drums and Vocals; and Bonnie Eisele-featured vocals.
First Seating: 11:00 AM - 12:30 pm
Second Seating:  1:00 - 2:30 pm
David’s Restaurant

Fri, 11/13/2015 - 11:17 am

The Black Women in Jazz & the Arts Awards Association announced today its 2016 Lady Jazz Master Award recipient, Melba Joyce
 
The award will be presented at the 3rd Annual Black Women in Jazz & the Arts Awards held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel Atlanta Perimeter at Ravinia in Atlanta, Ga., on April 10, 2016.
 
“Melba Joyce is a Master of Jazz. She is indeed an accomplished woman: educated, beautiful, family oriented, intelligent, kind and elegant..." said Erika Mitchell, the association’s chair.
 
Joyce’s career has spanned six decades of sharing top billing with such giants of the music world as Louis Armstrong, Sarah Vaughn, Louis Jordan, Lionel Hampton, Tony Bennett, Joe Williams, Marvin Gaye, Smokey Robinson and many others. What's more, she has been twice nominated as best female vocalist by Downbeat Reader's Poll.
                
Other awardees during the event will include Cicely Tyson, who will receive The Arts Award and Joyce's daughter, Carmen Bradford, will also receive the Lady Jazz Master Award.
 
"The Award was established in 2013 to recognize an individual with 30 or more years of exemplary works, contribution and dedication to service to the community via jazz or performing arts,” said Sha Battle, director, Black Women in Jazz & the Arts Awards.
 
If you are in the New York City area on November 27, 2015, stop by Minton's Jazz Club, 206 West 118th Street, Harlem, NY, to hear jazz legend Melba Joyce sing. The two shows will begin at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Confirm your reservations at (212) 243-2222.
 
For more information about Joyce, visit www.melbajoyce.net

Wed, 01/27/2016 - 2:03 pm

This February for Black History Month, the Louis Armstrong House Museum will honor the most influential band in jazz history, Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five through its new exhibit: Hotter Than That – 90 Years of Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five.  The Hot Five began recording in November 1925 but really hit their stride with their records of February 1926, including hits such as "Heebie Jeebies" and "Cornet Chop Suey."
 
This exhibit celebrates these landmark recordings that were the first records ever to be issued under Armstrong’s own name and represents the ground breaking recorded legacy of Louis Armstrong and this immortal group, whose music continues to influence future generations. As Armstrong himself said of his Hot Five recordings in 1970, “Ain’t nothing like it since, and can’t nobody play nothing like it now. My oldest record, can’t nobody touch it.”
 
In honor of Black History Month, visitors to the museum will take home part of the exhibit with a special collectable reproduction of one of Armstrong's early scrapbook pages, charting his meteoric rise to stardom in Chicago in the 1920s. Each collectable will also feature an appreciation of the Hot Fives by Director of Research Collections Ricky Riccardi, which will include Armstrong's own words on this vaunted series of recordings. 
 
Ricky Riccardi, Director of Research Collections at the Louis Armstrong House Museum, noted, "Louis Armstrong's Hot Five recordings are the most important recordings in jazz history, bar none. Everything stems from them and from Louis specifically. We hope this exhibit pays proper tribute to this landmark group but most of all, we hope it will make visitors further explore their music."
 
And to further enrich visitor experience in February, visitors will hear commentary from Louis himself in his own words through the trumpeter's private reel-to-reel tape collection.  The selected recordings feature Armstrong's role as a Civil Rights pioneer, including his late-1950s decision not to go back to his hometown of New Orleans because of a ban against integrated bands performing in public. Visitors who only know the gentle, smiling side of Satchmo will come away with a new appreciation for Armstrong's role in breaking down racial barriers.
 
About the Louis Armstrong House Museum:
The Louis Armstrong House Museum is located at 34-56 107th Street in Corona, Queens, New York. The museum is open TuesdayFriday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm and Saturday/Sunday from 12:00 noon – 5:00 pm.  Travel directions and more atLouisArmstrongHouse.org or 718.478.8274.

Wed, 03/16/2016 - 10:02 am

Actor Ethan Hawke visits 92Y on Thursday, March 17 at 8 pm with his new film, the Chet Baker biopic Born to Be Blue. Following a preview screening, Hawke discusses the film and his career with 92Y Reel Pieces moderator Annette Insdorf.  

Tickets can be purchased online at 92y.org, or via phone, 212.415.5500.
 
Fresh from directing the documentary Seymour:An Introduction, Hawke is back playing the jazz trumpet icon Chet Baker. Born to Be Blue (in theaters on March 25) is a cinematic riff on musical genius — undermined by drug addiction — set in the late 1950s when Baker was being compared to Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie (both of whom are portrayed in the film). Carmen Ejogo gives a soulful performance as the loving woman who tries to keep Baker away from heroin.

As Stephen Dalton wrote in The Hollywood Reporter, “[Hawke] gives an unshowy and vanity-free performance, all soft-spoken mischief and brittle arrogance, but laced with just enough blood, sweat and tears."
 
In addition to receiving an Oscar nomination for Richard Linklater's Boyhood in 2015, Ethan Hawke starred in Good Kill, 10,000 Saints, and the upcoming Maggie's Plan. His previous films include Dead Poets' Society, Training Day, Gattaca, and Linklater's "Before" Trilogy. 
 
Annette Insdorf—Columbia University Film professor and author—has been bringing audiences the best in film for 35 years, including previews of Oscar winners Spotlight and Birdman.

About 92nd Street Y
92nd Street Y is a center for the arts and innovation, a convener of ideas, and an incubator for creativity. Founded in 1874, it seeks to create, provide and disseminate programs of distinction that foster the physical and mental growth of people throughout their lives.  92Y is built on a foundation of Jewish values, including the importance of civil dialogue, community, civic responsibility, education and the arts and a commitment to welcoming and serving people of all ages, races, religions and ethnicities.

Wed, 05/11/2016 - 10:53 am

The great Count Basie said, “If you play a tune and a person don’t tap their feet, don’t play the tune.” He could have easily been referring to Dave Bass and David Basse. Each artist’s music causes countless toes to tap, and now, performing together, they present a night of the Count’s music, their own tunes ... and beyond.

Composer, pianist, and arranger Dave Bass started his jazz career in the 1970s touring the world and performing with artists as diverse as Brenda Lee and Bobby McFerrin. After a 20-year break, and a successful legal career, he’s back with a vengeance. DownBeat gave Dave’s most recent recording, NYC Sessions, a coveted 4-star review and named it one of the “Best Albums of 2015.”

David Basse, much like Count Basie, has deep roots in Kansas City. His soulful vocals have drawn praise far and wide, and the great Maya Angelou exclaimed, “I love the soul that is your voice.”

Both artists recorded extensively with the late, great Phil Woods, and Bass & Basse are honored to include Phil's long-time rhythm section, Bill Goodwin and Steve Gilmore, on their Narrows and Deer Head Inn gigs.

Tour Dates:

May 19 Narrows Center / Fall River, MA 
www.narrowscenter.org
w/ Bill Goodwin and Steve Gilmore

May 20 Shapeshifter / Brooklyn, NY 
www.shapeshifterlab.com
w/ Harvie S and Paul Wells

May 21 Deer Head Inn / Delaware Water Gap, PA
 www.deerheadinn.com
w/ Bill Goodwin and Steve Gilmore

Wed, 06/01/2016 - 1:02 pm

On Saturday, June 4 at 6:30 p.m. the Mahwah Museum will host the Jazz and Blues Guitar Celebration at Ramapo College Trustees Pavilion, 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Mahwah.  There will be live and silent auctions of many special guitars and music memorabilia, live entertainment and a raffle drawing.   This event will be the culmination of the Museums yearlong celebration of Les Paul’s 100th birthday
 
The live auction items will include:

2014 New Gibson Les Paul Traditional Model-Cherry Sunburst Solid Body Electric Guitar- Autographed by Les Paul on pickguard. 20th Anniversary Model. Epiphone Les Paul Solid Body Electric Guitar. Rosewood Dot Neck, Autographed by Les Paul on Pickguard. Fender Stratocaster Solid Body Guitar Autographed by Steve Miller, Fender Squire Honey Color Solid Body Electric Guitar Autographed by Vinnie Martel (Vanilla Fudge), Roger Krieger (Doors) and Les Paul on Pickguard.
 
For a full list and description of all live and silent auction items, visit www.mahwahmuseum.org.
 
The raffle will have four winners, the prizes being: A new 2014 Les Paul Traditional guitar, autographed by Les Paul, a Fender Squire Strat guitar, autographed by Brian Wilson, a Smick Acoustic Sunburst guitar, autographed by Jose Feliciano, and a Stedman Pro dark burgundy guitar, autographed by Mick Taylor.
 
Bucky Pizzarelli, Lou Pallo, Ed Laub, Dave Stryker and Vic Juris will provide live entertainment.  Wine, hors d’oeuvres, and light fare will be served.
 
Admission tickets are $30 and can be purchased either online at www.mahwahmuseum.org or by visiting the museum at 201 Franklin Turnpike, Mahwah NJ, during our regular hours; Wednesday Saturday and Sunday 1-4 p.m. Raffle tickets are $20 and can only be purchased in person, by visiting the museum during our regular hours, or by mailing cash or check payable to the Mahwah Museum Society to 201 Franklin Turnpike Mahwah, NJ 07430 with the number of raffle tickets desired.
 
The Museum is open weekends and Wednesdays from 1-4 p.m. The Donald Cooper Model Railroad is open on weekends only from 1-4 p.m.  Admission to the Museum is $5 for non-members; children and members free. 

For information on these and other events, visit www.mahwahmuseum.org or call 201-512-0099.The Mahwah Museum receives operating support from the NJ Historical Commission, Department of State.

Wed, 06/01/2016 - 1:44 pm

Morristown Mayor Tim Dougherty has announced the line-up for the sixth annual Morristown Jazz & Blues Festival to be held on the Green on Saturday, August 20, from noon until 10:00 p.m. This year’s free concert will celebrate the 90th birthday of legendary jazz guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli who has become a regular fixture at the annual festival. In addition, many of the artists will pay tribute to the late Rusty Paul, the bass-playing son of the great Les Paul. Rusty passed away in January after a long illness and had a special relationship with the festival.  
 
This year’s festival begins at noon with the George Gee Swing Orchestra, considered by jazz fans and critics to be one of the best swing bands in the country. Under the leadership of George Gee, the band has many top-flight jazz musicians including vocalists John Dokes and Hilary Gardner, saxophonist Michael Hashim, trumpeter Freddie Hendrix and bassist Marcus McLaurine among others.  
 
At two o’clock, legendary guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli returns to the stage with his quartet featuring his long-time partner Ed Laub on guitar, his number two son Martin on bass and the always popular Aaron Weinstein on violin. This year marks Bucky’s 90th birthday which the festival will celebrate.
 
Then at four, thanks to the law firm of Sherman Wells, the festival is proud to present Louis Prima Jr. and the Witnesses  playing the music of his incomparable father, including such hits as “Jump Jive ‘an Wail,” “Just a Gigilo,” and “Sing Sing Sing.” As the executor of the Louis Prima Foundation, Sherman Wells works closely with the Prima Family and has made it possible for the festival to present this tribute set.
 
At six o’clock, the music turns the blues with guitar prodigy Quinn Sullivan and his band. Sullivan has been mentored by the legendary Buddy Guy and at the age of 16 is considered one of the best of the new generation of blues artists. He exploded onto the national scene at the age of seven and this summer will be touring the United States, Canada and Europe.  
 
The full day of music concludes with the sensational pedal steel guitarist Robert Randolph and his Family Band. Robert considers Morristown his hometown and visits often when not touring around the world. Rolling Stone Magazine named him one of the Top Greatest Guitarists of All Time.
 
Festival co-producer Linda Smith is pleased to have Robert Randolph as this year’s headliner. “Robert has wanted to give back to his hometown and so he was an obvious choice to close out the festival,” she said. “Not only is he extremely popular, but he leads one of the world’s best party bands and will have everyone up and dancing with their opening song. His friendship with our good friend Rusty Paul who passed away in January makes the tribute to Les Paul’s son even more special.”
 
Mayor Tim Dougherty, who initiated the festival in 2011, added “This year’s festival celebrates Bucky Pizzarelli’s birthday and we are honored to have him as a regular performer for this mid-August tradition. With great jazz in the afternoon and hot blues in the evening, there is something for everyone’s tastes and it’s a day to look forward to. We are so grateful to our generous sponsors for making this incredible festival possible.
 
Major sponsors for this summer’s Morristown Jazz & Blues Festival include Sherman Wells, ConnectOne Bank, Hampshire Real Estate, Inglesino Pearleman, JCP&L, KSA Capital Management, Normandy Real Estate, Riker Danzig and Transmar Commodity Group.

Additional sponsors include Alaimo Associates, Delaware Raritan, F.J. Rawding, George and Martha’s Restaurant, Greenbaum Rowe Smith, Lindabury McCormick, Morristown Municipal Airport, the Community Theatre at MPAC, The Office, Topology NJ, Villa Enterprises, Morristown Parking Authority, Trustees of the Morristown Green, Hot House Jazz, NJ Arts, WBGO and the New Jersey Jazz Society.

The Morristown Jazz & Blues Festival will take place on the Green in Morristown rain or shine from noon until 10:00 p.m. Admission is free and many local restaurants will be offering specials for festival attendees. Bring your lawn chairs and blankets. For more information, visit www.morristownjazzandblues.org.

Wed, 06/08/2016 - 4:30 pm

Summer in the city begins on July 4th, Louis Armstrong’s traditional birthday, when the Louis Armstrong House Museum kicks off its signature summer concert series Hot Jazz / Cool Garden now in its 10th year.  For three days this summer, hot jazz is served up with red beans ’n rice in the Armstrongs’ Japanese inspired garden.  Birthday cake will be served on July 4th and Hot Jazz / Cool Garden series subscribers will enjoy a soul food luncheon too. It’s a wonderful world at the Louis Armstrong House Museum.
 
Hot Jazz / Cool Garden 2016 highlights three outstanding NYC bands.  On Monday, July 4th the Gotham Kings featuring Alphonso Horne will present a repertoire inspired by the King Oliver Creole Jazz Band.  David Ostwald’s Louis Armstrong Eternity Band will perform on Saturday, July 23rd with a tribute to the great trumpeter and Jane Monheit will present a “Louis & Ella” Verve record anniversary tribute on Saturday, August 13th.  Downbeat for each concert is at 2:00 pm.  Advance single tickets are $18 and include free admission to the museum.  A series subscription is $45.  Tickets can be purchased online at LouisArmstrongHouse.org.

Meet the Bands
 
Gotham Kings featuring Alphonso Horne
Inspired by the King Oliver Creole Jazz Band, Gotham Kings, featuring trumpeters Alphonso Horne and Riley Mulherkar demonstrates the versatility, style, and bond to be had in a two-trumpet act. The virtuosity of the young Louis Armstrong and innovative genius of King Oliver is passed back and forth interchangeably between Horne and Mulherkar. Gotham Kings weaves the sound of New Orleans into a rich musical fabric that demonstrates the history of the trumpet and the story of jazz.
 
Trumpeter Alphonso Horne has performed with many renowned jazz artists including Wynton Marsalis, Wes Anderson, Marcus Roberts, Delfeayo Marsalis, Diana Reeves, Michael Feinstein, and Jane Monheit. Alphonso has won many including awards the National Trumpet Competition and in the Aug, 2011 issue of JET Magazine, world-renowned trumpeter, Wynton Marsalis included Alphonso in a list of 16 young jazz musicians entitled, “Wynton’s Picks: Who’s Got Next.”
In the 2013-2014 season, Mr. Horne subbed for Wynton Marsalis in the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, and toured with the orchestra for the 2013 25th Anniversary Tour. Mr. Horne also performed on Broadway in the 17-piece orchestra for the show “After Midnight” featuring guest artists Fantasia Barrino, Dule Hill, K.D. Lang, Babyface, Toni Braxton and many more.

Mr. Horne is a member of the Count Basie Orchestra and is currently premiering in the Broadway show, “Shuffle Along” featuring Savion Glover and Audra McDonald.  
 
David Ostwald’s Louis Armstorng Eternity Band
Inspired by the noble jazz pioneers Louis Armstrong, Bix Beiderbecke, Duke Ellington, Jelly Roll Morton and their colleagues, David Ostwald’s Louis Armstrong Eternity Band breathes life and passion into America’s own great art form.  The band is currently in its sixteenth season of its critically acclaimed weekly Wednesday evening engagement at New York City’s Birdland.  This gig attracts a who’s-who of NYC’s jazz scene, both on stage and in the audience.  Guest musicians have included Wynton Marsalis, Dick Hyman, Jon Hendricks, Clark Terry, Jon Faddis, and blues great Big Joe Turner, whose recording with the band was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1986.
 
Since 1980, this acoustically electrifying group has appeared nationally and internationally in varied settings including Lincoln Center’s Midsummer’s Night Swing, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Jazz in July at the 92nd Street Y, Lionel Hampton’s New Orleans-style funeral procession, and Scotland’s Nairn International Jazz Festival.
 
Jane Monheit
Blessed with “a voice of phenomenal beauty” (Stephen Holden, New York Times), Jane Monheit has had plenty of milestone moments in establishing herself as one of today’s best and most important vocalist-musicians.  With her new album, The Songbook Sessions: Ella Fitzgerald—the first to be released on her own Emerald City Records—the Long Island native has surprised even herself with her artistic leap. Jane had thought about recording an Ella tribute for a long time.  On this new offering, Monheit pays joyous tribute to Ella while sharing a definitive portrait of herself, guided by her producer, arranger, and trumpet great, Nicholas Payton
 
At the young age of 20, Jane became first runner-up in the 1998 Thelonious Monk Institute’s vocal competition behind the late, great Teri Thornton. Soon after, Jane released her stunning debut album, Never Never Land, featuring Kenny Barron, Ron Carter, and Lewis Nash. The first of four recordings for N-Coded—a label founded by Dave Grusin and Larry Rosen with Phil Ramone—the album was voted Best Recording Debut by the Jazz Journalists Association and stayed on the Billboard jazz chart for a year.
 
Come Dream with Me (N-Coded) followed in 2001 with a No. 1 debut on the Billboard jazz chart and including a wider range of Jane’s influences as well as popular jazz standards. Jane debuted six more critically acclaimed albums through 2013 reflecting Monheit’s dual interests in jazz and cabaret.  Monheit has also appeared on the albums of many other artists over the years, including Terence Blanchard, Tom Harrell, Freddy Cole, Mark O’Connor, David Benoit, and Ivan Lins.
 
About the Louis Armstrong House Museum:
The Louis Armstrong House Museum is located at 34-56 107th Street in Corona, Queens, New York. The museum is open TuesdayFriday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm and Saturday/Sunday from 12:00 noon – 5:00 pm.  This year, the museum will be open on Monday, July 4th in honor of Louis Armstrong’s traditional birthday.  Travel directions and more at LouisArmstrongHouse.org or 718.478.8274.
 
Currently on exhibit:  Hotter Than That: 90 Years of Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five.
 
Parking is available in the neighborhood and the museum is accessible by subway via the 7 train.
 
The Louis Armstrong House Museum, the long-time home of Louis and Lucille Armstrong, is a National Historic Landmark and New York City Landmark in Corona, Queens.  Since its opening in 2003, more than 100,000 visitors from all over the world have been introduced to the wonderful world of Louis Armstrong. The museum’s programs feature historic house tours, jazz concerts, and a wide variety of educational programs. The museum owns and administers the largest research archives in the world for any jazz musician.
 
Thanks to the vision and funding of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, the Louis Armstrong House Museum welcomes visitors, six days per week, 52 weeks per year.  The Louis Armstrong House Museum is a member of the American Alliance of Museums, Association of African American Museums, Museums Council of New York City, New York State Museums Association, National Trust for Historic Preservation, NYC & Co., and the Queens Tourism Council.  The museum is a cultural center of Queens College / CUNY and constituent of Kupferberg Center for the Arts.

Mon, 06/20/2016 - 4:32 pm

The Cafe welcomes this exceptional jazz quartet, featuring Dan Brubeck on drums, Mike DeMicco on guitar, Tony Foster on piano, and Adam Thomas on bass and vocals.

Dan is a renowned jazz drummer, with Adam and Tony being regular members of the Dan Brubeck Quartet. They are joined by Mike DeMicco, virtuoso guitarist and longtime member of the Brubeck Brothers Quartet.

Dan Brubeck is a renowned jazz drummer, and a member of one of America's most notable musical families. He is the son of legendary American jazz icon Dave Brubeck, and the rhythmic force behind the highly successful Brubeck Brothers Quartet, whose CDs have consistently been at the top of the jazz radio charts. Dan's recent CD with the Dan Brubeck Quartet"Celebrating the Music of Dave and Iola Brubeck", is Juno-nominated for best jazz vocal album of 2016. 

Dan was producer and drummer for the 1993 Grammy nominated Trio Brubeck album, and performed in the 1996 annual Grammy Award Ceremony as well as The 2009 Kennedy Center Honors. Dan has toured the international music circuit since his early teens, as the leader of his own groups, and as a featured soloist with many of the world's top symphonies, pop and jazz artists. Dan has recorded and toured the world extensively with Dave Brubeck. 

Dan's original drumming style, distinctive solos, and his mastery of polyrhythms have earned him the respect of critics worldwide.

The Dan Brubeck Quartet

Appearing @ The Rosendale Cafe

Saturday, June 25th, 2016 | 8:00pm

Rosendale, NY

Tue, 08/23/2016 - 2:11 pm

City Parks Foundation is proud to announce the 2016 Charlie Parker Jazz Festival. The festival is New York City's annual salute to the legendary saxophonist, featuring contemporaries of Charlie Parker as well as young jazz musicians that continue to shape and drive the art form.

In a world of modern music - not just jazz - few figures loom as large or cast as long a shadow as saxophonist Charlie Parker, best known as "Bird" (short for "Yardbird") to generations of musicians. He was born in 1920 and almost sixty years since his death in 1955, he is universally celebrated for single-handedly inventing bebop and bringing jazz into the modern era.

The festival is particularly significant this year given the upcoming centennial of the musical dawning of the term “jazz,” as well as what would have been the 100th birthdays of late jazz greats including Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, and Ella Fitzgerald. This year’s festival will feature performances on August 26 and 27 in Marcus Garvey Park, Harlem and August 28 in Tompkins Square Park in the East Village.

On the 26th, audiences can enjoy performances from Jason Lindner: Breeding Ground, the electrifying 11-piece band led by keyboardist Jason Lindner and jazz vocalist Antoinette Montague, accompanied by Jazzmobile friends.

Randy Weston African Rhythms Sextet will play jazz infused with influences of African culture, while jazz pianist and gospel musician Cory Henry will wow audiences with his full band sound on the 27th. 

August 28th, audiences will be introduced to DeJohnette - Moran - Holland, the first-time collaboration of influential jazz drummer Jack DeJohnette, innovative pianist Jason Moran, and prolific double bassist Dave Holland. Listeners will be delighted by performances from award winning jazz vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter Allan Harris and acclaimed saxophonist Donny McCaslin, who will perform his newest album accompanied by his group.

New this year, the Charlie Parker Jazz Festival will feature film screenings at The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music’s Jazz Performance Space. “The Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story,” will show on August 24th and feature a post-film discussion with alto sax star and Frank’s protege Grace Kelly, and Frank’s manager Reggie Marshall. “Bill Evans: Time Remembered” will be screened on the 25th,featuring a post-film discussion with the producer Bruce Spiegel.

The complete Charlie Parker Jazz Festival schedule follows or can be found on the City Parks Foundation website here:  Charlie Parker Jazz Festival.

Wednesday

Aug 24

7:30 PM

Charlie Parker Jazz Festival Screening: Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story 

The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music’s Jazz Performance Space

MN

Film

Thursday

Aug 25

7:30 PM

Charlie Parker Jazz Festival Screening: Bill Evans Time Remembered

The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music’s Jazz Performance Space

MN

Film

Friday

Aug 26

6:30 PM

Charlie Parker Jazz Festival:

Jason Lindner: Breeding Ground / Antoinette Montague and Jazzmobile Friends /  DJ Greg Caz

Marcus Garvey Park

MN

Music

Saturday

Aug 27

2:00 PM

Charlie Parker Jazz Festival:

Randy Weston African Rhythms Sextet / Cory Henry & the Funk Apostles / The Artistry of Jazzmeia Horn / Charles Turner III / Master Class: Samuel Coleman

Marcus Garvey Park

MN

Music

Sunday

Aug 28

3:00 PM

Charlie Parker Jazz Festival:

DeJohnette - Moran - Holland / Allan Harris / Donnie McCaslin Group / Grace Kelly

Tompkins Square Park

MN

Music

Thu, 10/06/2016 - 12:10 pm

Going stronger than ever The Django Reinhardt NY Festival and The Allstars have taken the US by storm.  They are headed to NY from Paris.  They land at Birdland, their official home, where it all started in 2000, with an ‘idea’ inspired by Producers Ettore Stratta and Pat Philips due to their work with famed Jazz Violinist Stephane Grappelli, Django’s partner, back in the 30’s and 40’s when they took Europe and the world by storm.   The Producers set out to bring Django’s style out from underground to ‘overground’ and spread the word!  HOT JAZZ is better than ever and here to stay!
 
Legendary gypsy guitarist DORADO SCHMITT, a real Django look alike, (who is also a Violinist and Compser) returns. He first came in 2002 and hasn’t missed a year yet, coming from a gypsy community Forbach, near Germany.  Family members have also been coming, growing up, marrying, having their own children, and becoming virtuosos … we get to see the Schmitt family evolve right on the Birdland stage.  Son, AMATI SCHMITT, who joined the show, was 6 when it all started…now a true gypsy guitar great.  Brother, Samson, who comes in the summer, turned into a major artist and leader.
 
Rooted in gypsy culture The Festival is authentic in ‘heart and soul’, real atmospheric sounds of excitement and romance with rip roaring performances and beautiful melodies telling of love with ‘original music’ that brings Django’s style to today.  
 
They are Joined by accordion whiz LUDOVIC BEIER who also plays accordion of whom Downbeat Magazine said - “heartwrenching…as great a solo as was heard at Newport (2014)”.  On Violin is PIERRE BLANCHARD who swings like crazy, a prodigy of Stephane Grappelli.  On bass is Xavier Nikiq with Dorado’s cousin, Francko Mehrstein on rhythm Guitar.
 
Each night there is a special Jazz Great as Guest:
              Tues, Nov.   15:  Jorge Continentino/Flute/Sax
                                   16:  Jazzmeia Horn/Vocalist,
                                        (Recent Winner of the Monk  Institute Vocal Competition)
                                   17:  Grace Kelly/Sax  
                                       (Recent Winner of the Hot House Jazz Saxophone Award)            
                                   18 & 19: Edmar Castaneda/Jazz Harp
                                    20:  Joel Frahm, Sax
 
A CROWD FAVORITE AND TOP CANDIDATE FOR THE HARDEST SWINGING BAND AT THE NEWPORT JAZZ FESTIVAL!”  Allen Morrison, Downbeat Magazine
 
TOUR DATES:
                                     15 – 20:  BIRDLAND
                                     Nov. 22 & 23:  The Dokata, Minn., Minnesota
                                     25 – 27  :  The San Francisco Jazz Festival
                                     29 :  San Diego Atheneum
                                      Dec. 4:   Home Concert, Altadena, Calif.
                                      8 & 9:   Mizner Park Performing Center, Boca Raton,  Florida
                                      11     The Faena Theater, Faena Hotel, Miami, Florida

Tue, 11/15/2016 - 1:09 pm

Going stronger than ever The Django Reinhardt NY Festival and The Allstars have taken the US by storm.  They are headed to NY from Paris.  They land at Birdland, their official home, where it all started in 2000, with an ‘idea’ inspired by Producers Ettore Stratta and Pat Philips due to their work with famed Jazz Violinist Stephane Grappelli, Django’s partner, back in the 30’s and 40’s when they took Europe and the world by storm.   The Producers  set out to bring Django’s style out from underground to ‘overground’ and spread the word!  HOT JAZZ is better than ever and here to stay !
 
Legendary gypsy guitarist DORADO SCHMITT , a real Django look alike, (who is also a Violinist and Compser) returns. He first came in 2002 and hasn’t missed a year yet, coming from a gypsy community Forbach, near Germany.  Family members have also been coming, growing up, marrying, having their own children, and becoming virtuosos … we get to see the Schmitt family evolve right on the Birdland stage.  Son, AMATI SCHMITT, who joined the show, was 6 when it all started…now a true gypsy guitar great.  Brother, Samson, who comes in the summer, turned into a major artist and leader.
 
Rooted in gypsy culture The Festival is authentic in ‘heart and soul’, real atmospheric sounds of excitement and romance with rip roaring performances and beautiful melodies telling of love with ‘original music’ that brings Django’s style to today.  
 
They are Joined by accordion whiz LUDOVIC BEIER  who also plays accordina of whom Downbeat Magazine said - “heartwrenching…as great a solo as was heard at Newport (2014)”.  On Violin is  PIERRE BLANCHARD who swings like crazy, a prodigy of Stephane Grappelli.  On bass is Xavier Nikq with Dorado’s cousin, Francko Mehrstein on rhythm Guitar.
 
Each night there is a special Jazz Great as Guest:
              Tues, Nov.   15:  Jorge Continentino/Flute/Sax
                                   16:  Jazzmeia Horn/Vocalist,
                                        (Recent Winner of the Monk  Institute Vocal Competition)
                                   17:  Grace Kelly/Sax  
                                       (Recent Winner of the Hot House Jazz Saxophone Award)            
                                   18 & 19: Edmar Castaneda/Jazz Harp
                                    20:  Joel Frahm, Sax
 
“A CROWD FAVORITE AND TOP CANDIDATE FOR THE HARDEST SWINGING BAND AT THE NEWPORT JAZZ FESTIVAL!”  Allen Morrison, Downbeat Magazine
 
TOUR DATES:
                                     15 – 20:  BIRDLAND
                                     Nov. 22 & 23:  The Dokata, Minn., Minnesota
                                     25 – 27  :  The San Francisco Jazz Festival
                                     29 :   Athenaeum Music and Arts Library
                                      Dec. 3:   Home Concert, Altadena, Calif. (davidnaiditch@charter.net)
                                      8 & 9:   Mizner Park Performing Center, Boca Raton,  Florida
                                      11     The Faena Theater, Faena Hotel, Miami, Florida

Thu, 01/05/2017 - 8:30 am

Released in 1977, Elegant Gypsy was the follow-up album to Al Di Meola’s debut release.  The distinctive music on the album is a fusion of jazz and rock, with Di Meola’s lightning-fast guitar riffs intermixed with lyrical acoustical passages.  The album was named Best Guitar Album in Guitar Player magazine and is generally regarded as a masterpiece in the rock-jazz fusion music genre.

A bona fide guitar hero and perennial poll-winner, Al Di Meola has been recognized internationally over the past four decades as a virtuoso of the highest order. A prolific composer and prodigious six-string talent, Di Meola has amassed over 20 albums as a leader while collaborating on a dozen or so others with the likes of Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke, Lenny White, John McLaughlin, Paco de Lucia, Jean-Luc Ponty and more. And while his dazzling technique on both acoustic and electric guitars has afforded him regal status among hordes of frettboard aficionados who regularly flock to his concerts, the depth of Di Meola's writing and compositions along with the soulfulness of his guitar expressions have won him legions of fans worldwide.

Al Di Meola's “40th Anniversary Meet & Greet Package” includes:
Admission to sound check
20 Minute Q & A session delivered by Al Di Meola from onstage
Meet and Greet
Autographed 40th Anniversary Poster
Contact Box Office for details!

BUY TICKETS

Thu, 01/05/2017 - 9:04 am

At 91 years old, legendary Guitar Master, Bucky Pizzarelli continues to make great music. 

His protégé, Ed Laub (guitar and vocals) will once again join him to celebrate Bucky’s Birthday Bash 2017. These two guitar virtuosos will not be alone in this year’s celebration. 

Bucky’s son, Martin Pizzarelli will return on bass. Konrad Paskudzki (piano) will take the seat behind our concert grand. Born in Western Australia, Konrad spent years playing piano with the likes of the Clayton/Hamilton Jazz Orchestra and the Jeff Hamilton Trio. In 2013, he joined the Johnny Pizzarelli Quartet. Also on the stage will be Dag Markus (drums) and one of New York City’s most sought-after clarinetists and saxophonists, Linus Wyrsch.

This birthday party promises to be one of the best! Special pricing: $20 in advance, $25 at the door.

Morris Museum

6 Normandy Heights Road

Morristown, NJ 07960

BOX OFFICE: 973.971.3706 EMAIL: info@morrismuseum.org

Thu, 01/05/2017 - 11:41 am

Composer and trumpeter Terence Blanchard said that "Music and art have the power to change hearts and souls.” It is a belief brought to life through the work of Blanchard and his E-Collective, a revolutionary ensemble that thrives off of the perfect mixture of Blanchard’s genius and the innovations of four young musical pioneers: guitarist Charles Altura, pianist Fabian Almazan, bassist David “DJ” Ginyard, Jr., and drummer Oscar Seaton. "This band represents the best of America's ideals. We're five very different personalities with different visions who play together for a common goal: creating music that hopefully heals hearts and opens minds.”

Blanchard was overwhelmed by the healing impact of his music on the audience during a poignant E-Collective performance in Staten Island this past August. In attendance were many friends and family of Eric Garner — a local man who had been fatally injured in an altercation with police and to whom the E-Collective’s debut album, Breathless (2015), is dedicated. Motivated by this experience, the E-Collective’s next album, tentatively titled, Caravan, will be recorded live in cities around the country that have been similarly impaired by racial tension.  The recordings began on January 2-3 in St. Paul, MN at the Dakota Jazz Club;and continue on  January 4-5 in Cleveland, OH at BopStopJanuary 7th in Dallas, TX at The Wyley Theatre.

The recordings end on January 8th in New York at Ginny's Supper Club at The Red Rooster. Set times are 7:00pm & 9:30pm. For a complimentary ticket to either set, please contact Brian Reid at b.reid@imnworld.com to make a reservation as space is limited.

As a five-time Grammy-winning composer and musician, Terence Blanchard extends a jazz tradition that embodies the work of Louis Armstrong and is grounded in their shared hometown of New Orleans. The Wall Street Journal said, "Blanchard's sound is advantageous without losing its grip on creativity." As a performer and composer, Blanchard's individuality can be heard in director Spike Lee’s films; Emmy winner Anthony Hemingway’s Red Tails; his opera “Champion"; an upcoming FOX drama; a dance collaboration with Desmond Richardson’s Complexions; two commissions for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and the Los Angeles Philharmonic; and two Broadway plays.  Blanchard has defined his place in contemporary culture that extends well beyond jazz’s reach.

Thu, 02/02/2017 - 8:58 am

While many of its architects – the creators of the sound, style and form of Bossa Nova and Samba - are no longer with us, two talents who shortly followed in their footsteps are coming to Birdland in an exciting collaboration.

This magical collaboration of MARCOS VALLE and CELSO FONSECA, direct from Rio in Brazil, holds up the tradition of the era of Bossa Nova and Samba, bringing melodic genius and fabulous infectious swinging Brazilian rhythms along with their wonderful Band, consisting of the beautiful/talented Vocalist Patricia Alvi, famed Brazilian drummer Renato Massa, the very talented Itaiguara Brandao on bass, and  exciting Trumpeter Jesse Sadoc, also from Brazil.

MARCOS VALLE – The charismatic Composer, Keyboardist, Singer, has had a 50-year career, following in the footsteps of the Jobim/Lyra generation with over 500 songs to his credit composed and recorded by the greats Sarah Vaughan, Chicago, Dizzy Gillespie, Oscar Peterson, Ramsey Lewis, Dave Brubeck, Toots Thielemans,  Jay Z, Kanye West and so many more .  Some of his hits include “Summer Samba”, “The Face I Love’, and “Batucada” known around the world .
 
CELSO FONSECA  - also brilliantly talented, - Singer, Composer, Producer, has had his songs recorded by Caetano Veloso, Gal Costa, Gilberto Gil, Milton Nascimento, Nana Caymmi, Maria Bethania, Vinicius Cantuaria, and of course Marcos Valle and many more important artists.  With 14 critically acclaimed ‘solo vocal albums’,  dating back to 1966 such as “Minha cara”, “O som do sim”, and many more…all the way to recent years with “No meu filme” in 2011 and  “Like Nice” in 2015 , nominated 4X for a Latin Grammy in 2016 

Brazilian music found a new home at Birdland  once it opened it’s doors almost 10 years ago  to the sounds and rhythms of Brazil to great success thru Producers  Pat Philips and Ettore Stratta, known for their Brazilian music productions  and love of this genre of music …” Bossa Nova and Samba”… in an effort to keep this important music alive and performed by many of the greats.
 
Birdland:  315 W. 44th Street, NYC    
Reservations:  212 581 – 3080 or www.birdlandjazz.com

Fri, 02/03/2017 - 9:12 am

Tito Puente, Jr.’s vibrant mambo and salsa tunes are coming to energize the Paramount Hudson Valley Theater! Following in the footsteps of his father’s acclaimed career, Tito Puente, Jr. has embarked on a musical trip of his own, crafting a mixture of old and new into a powerful, unique sound.

Puente, Jr. has become an audience favorite in casinos, performing arts centers, symphony halls, and jazz festivals worldwide, performing more than 300 shows over the past five years. He continues on his journey to keep the legacy of his late father alive and expose a new generation to this joyful musical style.

Puente, Jr.’s 2004 album, In My Father’s Shoes, featured classic Puente titles and was spun into a BET Jazz TV special. Got Mambo?, Puentes Jr.’s second album, signaled the flourishing of a joyful personal style and has received heavy praise from Tropical and Latin Jazz critics alike. He has also appeared on ABC’s soap opera hit One Life to Live and has performed with the National Symphony Orchestra.

The younger Puente is determined to nurture the musical legacy left by his father. He refuses to let his father become a distant memory.

“People who don’t know anything about Latin music know my father and people always, always smile when they say my father’s name,” he says. “That is a very special gift I have been given.”

Learn more / purchase tickets.

Mon, 02/06/2017 - 6:22 pm

50 Years since it's conception - Jon Hendricks’ masterful lyricisation of the legendary Miles Davis/Gil Evans album, MILES AHEAD, receives a February premiere in Manhattan. In the presence of the master wordsmith himself – Miles Ahead will be performed by the London Vocal Project (a 20-piece choir plus rhythm section), featuring special guest soloists - all of whom have a long and deep association with Jon and his music.

Propelled by the success of 'Sing a Song of Basie' - the seminal Lambert, Hendricks and Ross album, Jon Hendricks started work on his lyricisation of Miles Ahead almost fifty years ago. However, it was only in 2012 - over forty years later - that he began to collaborate closely with London Vocal Project director Pete Churchill who, with the support of the choir, has now helped to bring his creative dream to life.

Every note of both Miles Davis' distinctive solos and Gil Evans' ground-breaking big-band writing has been meticulously re-scored for voices with Jon's words imbuing each track with a new narrative. As this process, neared completion LVP began to immerse itself in the sound world of Gil Evans, memorizing the scores and capturing all the nuances of the original recording.

Exciting as the rehearsal process was, however, it started to become increasingly clear that Jon might never get to hear LVP sing his lifetime's work due to the geographical distance between them. This was when Pete decided to contact Quincy Jones - a lifelong friend of Jon Hendricks - and ask for his help. It is through Quincy's generosity and the support of the Jazz Foundation of America that LVP have been able to bring Miles Ahead home to New York to be performed in the presence of its creator, the great Jon Hendricks. The project Jon began almost fifty years ago, will finally be complete.

Looking ahead, LVP have been working hard in the studio putting the finishing touches to a recording of Jon Hendricks' Miles Ahead and it is due for release later this year. Furthermore, the European premiere performance, hopefully the first of many, has been scheduled in London for May 21st.

Venue: Saint Peter's Church,
619 Lexington Avenue at 54th Street, New York, NY 10022

Date & timings: Friday 17th February 2017, 7.00pm (doors open at 6.30pm)

Tue, 02/14/2017 - 8:18 am

Headlining the 8th annual Mid-Atlantic Jazz Festival are Rene Marie, Houston Person, and Etienne Charles & Creole Soul. All activities are held under one roof at the Hilton Hotel & Executive Meeting Center in Rockville, Maryland from February 16-19, 2017.

Delfeayo Marsalis and the Uptown Orchestra bring New Orleans to the Festival!

The theme this year is “Celebrating the Second Line,” so who better to bring on the thrill of New Orleans but Delfeayo Marsalis and the Uptown Jazz Orchestra. This pre-festival event will be held on Thursday, February 16. Marsalis and his orchestra’s own Uptown Grand Marshall will lead the Jazz Academy of Music’s Mardi Gras Fundraiser Gala. This black-tie event will include a three-course New Orleans-style dinner and an opening performance by the Jazz Academy Orchestra. 

Click Here For: $55 SPECIAL “CONCERT ONLY” TICKET 

Theater style seating.
Doors open at 8pm after the Jazz Academy of Music’s
Mardi Gras Fundraiser Gala Dinner!

Other artists include Russell Malone, Steve Turre, Paul Carr, Bobby Broom, Vanessa Rubin, Paul Bollenback, the Greg Hatza ORGANization, Akua Allrich, Janelle Gill, Amy Shook, Savannah Harris, Lavenia Nesmith, Jamie Davis, and the 2016 “Jazz Voice” winner, Noel Simone Wippler.

Wed, 02/15/2017 - 8:05 am

Guitarist, Roni Ben-Hur celebrates the music of two iconic musicians who had a major influence on his style, Brazilian guitarist and composer, Beden Powell, on February 17, and the high priest of jazz, Thelonious Monk, on February 18. For these two nights, Roni assembled a top flight quartet featuring the lyrical Steve Nelson on vibes, soulful bassist, Santi Debriano, and two separate drummers for each night, Helio Schiavo, who toured and recored with Baden Powell for over a decade, and Leroy Williams, who started his career as a member of Thelonious Monk's quartet. In these two concerts, Roni introduces a fresh and personal take on the music of Powell and Monk, while keeping a direct link to their original intent. Having Helio Schiavo and Leroy Williams in the group allows Roni, Steve and Santi to hear and feel first hand what Powell and Monk were like on the and off the stage, and gives their performance an added depth and perspective.

Ben-Hur, known for his sweet tone, infectious rhythm, lush harmonies and innovative improvisation straddles comfortably the world of straight ahead jazz and the realm of samba jazz.  He has collaborated and recorded with iconic figures of both worlds such as Barry Harris and Leny Andrade.  His most recent recordings, Manhattan Style (Jazz Heads) with the collaborative trio, Our Thing, featuring bassist Santi Debriano and drummer Duduka Da Fonseca, and Alegria De Viver (Motema Music) (http://motema.com/artists/leny-adrade-and-roni-ben-hur/)  with Leny Andrade, showcase the guitarist mastery of what jazz is today, a potpourri of high art with influences from around the globe.  Roni has recored 11 CD's as a leader and co leader, and he continues to record, and tour and is an active educator, directing the jazz program at the Kaufman Center in New York City.

Fri, 02/17/2017 - 11:05 am

Frank Vignola’s stunning virtuosity has made him the guitarist of choice for many of the world’s top musicians, including Ringo Starr, Madonna, Boston Pops, New York Pops, and guitar legend Les Paul, who named Vignola to his “Five Most Admired Guitarists List.” At 28, Vinny Raniolo has already proved to be among the elite having performed and recorded with Bucky Pizzareli, Tommy Emmanuel and David Grisman. Frank and Vinny will be joined by Bassist Gary Mazzaroppi for this special performance. Ramapo singers Jackie Narciso and, from England, Benjamin Sims will open the show. Come and join us for a wonderful evening!

Saturday, February 25, 2017, 8 p.m. | Berrie Center, Ramapo College

505 Ramapo Valley Road

Mahwah, NJ 07430

Tickets: $30/27/24

Buy Online HERE

Box Office: (201) 684-7844

Mon, 02/27/2017 - 11:04 am

In the first ever retrospective of the life and legacy of one of the most important figures in Latin Jazz, The Hostos Center for the Arts and Culture announces “Tito Puente: A Fifty-Year Retrospective of ‘El Rey,’ a multi-day, in-depth examination of his career through concerts, panels, film, dance, and more. With support from the National Endowment for the Arts, the retrospective, under the artistic direction of former Puente musical director José Madera, Jazz@ Lincoln Center Orchestra bassist / composer / arranger Carlos Henríquez, and Puente historian and archivist Joe Conzo, Sr., will take place from Thursday, April 20 through Saturday, April 22, 2017 at the Hostos Center for the Arts & Culture at Hostos Community College, located at 450 Grand Concourse (at 149th Street) in the Bronx.
 
Ernesto Antonio "Tito" Puente (April 20, 1923 – May 31, 2000) was arguably the most popular Latin artist of his time and many believe had the greatest influence on the Latin jazz art form, in melding innovative ideas related to jazz with the Afro-Cuban tradition of the mambo and other styles. With eight Grammys, 189 albums, and a career that spanned five decades, he was known for bringing Latin music to new audiences and as the composer of such hits as ''Oye Como Va' and "Ran Kan Kan." With an influence on the entire music field, he helped to promote the careers of many artists including singers Celia Cruz and La Lupe. 
 
Tito Puente had a deep connection to Hostos. He performed at the Center many times and Hostos Community College maintains an archive of Puente memorabilia with posters, musical instruments, awards, photographs and recordings. For the past five years, the College has offered a continuing education course focused on the Latin Jazz master which has featured many former Puente band members and musical associates as guest speakers.  A logical extension, the three-day event at Hostos will promote a greater understanding of this important artist and the art form he helped to create, engaging both hard-core Puente fans and those less familiar with the artist, with many multimedia and multigenerational activities.  
 
The three concerts over the course of the retrospective will cover the entire career of Tito Puente. On April 22, 2017, the 18-piece Mambo Legends Orchestra, led by José Madera and which features many Puente Orchestra alumni, will perform the master’s music from his early years, 1950 – 1966 known as the “Palladium era,” For this event, Madera has transcribed and arranged material from the six different instrumental iterations of the Orchestra some of which has not been heard in over 50 years.
 
Preceding, on April 21, 2017, Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) bassist / composer / arranger Carlos Henríquez, who performed with Puente at the age 17 and regularly leads the J @ LC Orchestra, will premiere a 12-piece ensemble of musicians, performing a youthful take on Puente’s music. Focusing on the Latin Jazz Era from 1967 to 2000, the recreated charts will be from a period when Puente moved away from the 17-piece band and embraced smaller ensembles such as “the Golden Men” as well as from his recordings with the legendary singers Celia Cruz and La Lupe. In partnership with Lincoln Center Education, Henríquez will also lead a free family performance for all ages, teaching young audiences why Puente’s music continues to influence a new generation of fans. 
 
The retrospective will also include workshops, a panel discussion, and a film, amongst other activities. José Madera, John “Dandy” Rodríguez, and other notable percussionists will lead a percussion workshop, open to the public. A panel discussion, “Don’t Call it Salsa: The Legacy of and Impact of Tito Puente on Latin Jazz” will feature music historians and musicians, and the PBS documentary “Tito Puente: the King of Latin Music,” will be screened with a talk-back after. Hostos will create a listening room, where Joe Conzo Sr. will play never before heard selections from his personal collection of more than 6,000 Puente live recordings. The Tito Puente Legacy Project, the archive that includes posters, photographs, awards and musical instruments of the bandleader, will be open throughout the weekend and a tour will be available.

Tue, 02/28/2017 - 7:09 am

Since her debut in 2004, Nicole Henry has established herself as one of the jazz world's most acclaimed vocalists, possessing a potent combination of dynamic vocal abilities, impeccable phrasing, and powerful emotional resonance. Ms. Henry's passionate, soulful voice and heart-felt charisma has earned her a Soul Train Award for “Best Traditional Jazz Performance," three Top-10 U.S. Billboard and HMV Japan jazz albums. Heralded by The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, The Japan Times, El Pais, Jazz Times, Essence and more, Ms. Henry tells real stories through repertoire from the American Songbook, classic and contemporary jazz, contemporary standards, blues and originals.

NICOLE HENRY returns to Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola
Jazz at Lincoln Center, NYC
“A Time for Love”
Wednesday & Thursday, March 1 – 2
Showtimes: 7:30pm & 9:30pm

David Cook (Piano); Ben Williams (Bass); Jonathan Barber (Drums); Avi Rothbard (Guitar)

Tue, 03/07/2017 - 9:34 am

A character portrait of anti-archetype guitar hero, Bill Frisell, this nuanced film traces the ideas and processes that shaped Frisell’s music, and provides rare insight into the mind and personality of one of the significant musicians of recent decades.

Full of live music, revealing stories, and intimate access to the normally reclusive Frisell, various collaborations are followed from development to fruition, including the last ever performance of the Paul Motian Trio with Frisell and Joe Lovano.

Also featuring Bonnie Raitt, Hal Willner, Paul Simon, Nels Cline, Joey Baron, Jim Hall, Jason Moran, Mike Gibbs, John Zorn, Jack DeJohnette, Ron Carter and John Abercrombie.