Artists

artists

The Raw Power of Rose Hill Drive

Tinnitus: the perception of sound in the ears or head where no external source is present. Someone with tinnitus often describes it as "ringing in the ears," but people report hearing all kinds of sounds: crickets, whooshing, pulsing, ocean waves, buzzing, even music.

Langerado Part I

It's interesting that when you ask anyone from south Florida what the local music scene is like, most locals will reply 'What music scene?". Now don't get me wrong, there is a music scene that really caters to the jazz, Latin and blues world but nothing alternative or rock that really stood out and connected south Florida to the rest of the world since the days of the Hollywood Sportatorium that is until now Langerado.

Turbine: Always Turning Out The Good Stuff

photo(s) by Kent Anderson- for the Grateful Web

In 2005, jammers at the 10,000 Lakes Festival were floored by the power duo from New York City, Turbine. Ryan Rightmire (harmonica, acoustic guitar, vocals) and Jeremy Hilliard (electric guitar, vocals) had audiences awe-struck when they launched into their set. "There was a moment after the first long jam of the set, and no one was making any noise during the song, " recalls Hilliard. "We finished and for a second, we were wondering what was going to happen. Then everyone sort of exploded."

"Everyone was such careful listeners," adds Rightmire. "A lot of times when you're playing at a bar, people are talking. But at a festival like this, everyone is so attentive, and it's just a pleasure to play in that environment."

The comment most people made, including myself, was: How can two people have such a full sound with only two guitars and a harmonica?!  There were bass parts and percussion parts that surprised everyone. But what drew me and others mostly was the variety and quality of the original songs they brought with them.

It was no surprise then that they were invited back last year. By this time, however, Turbine had expanded into a full four-piece band, adding Justin Kimmel on bass and Jason Nazary on drums.  Kimmel also fills in vocally for some really tight three-part harmonies and necessary vocal backup when Rightmire is playing harmonica.  Though the band had only been together a matter of months, they were right on. "They bring their personalities as well as just playing the songs we already had," says Hilliard. "The drummer, Jason Nazary, drives the improvisations a lot to new places. It's much more communicative than people just backing us."  And, Rightmire adds, "We just didn't want to find a couple of guys to back us. We were really looking for people to push us as well. I think we found that."

turbineThe addition of new band members has completely altered the way the band writes and arranges.  Though they had hammered bass and percussion into their duo arrangements, writing became even more creative.  "It's interesting that the more people you add, you think there's less space to work with because there are more instruments," says Rightmire. "We're kind of getting freed up to do other things because you don't need to worry about holding it down so to speak or trying to cover the drums and bass that aren't there. When they are there, you are kind of freed up to explore."

Hilliard adds, "With the new band, everyone wants to see where we're going to be in a year and what that's going to sound like." That's true. And, the proof is in the new album that will be coming out late this spring, just before festival season. The new album will be the first for the full band and will complement Turbine's duo album, Don't Mind If I Should.

This new album will be an opportunity to see the versatility of what Turbine can do. During the 2006 10,000 Lakes Festival, Turbine not only did a stint on opening night up in the Saloon Stage, but spend the rest of the weekend, playing during lunch in the VIP hospitality tent. The band spent two hours or more entertaining the other musicians, the staff, members of the press, and those fortunate enough to buy VIP tickets. It was a treat to hear their full original repertoire. They did jam rock songs, sea chanties, Irish drinking songs, folk tunes, ballads, spacey jams, Afro beat, and everything in between.

Most impressive was Rightmire's harmonica work.  Using wooden Horner Blues Harps that don't have that plastic sound, he puts them through a microphone with pedals that he helped develop with Frank Sternot, a Chicagoan who developed the traditional microphone most harpists buy.  "It was too bluesy for me," says Rightmire. "So, I sought him out and worked with him to create one that's more like my own sound. You can always add, but you can't take away. At the beginning, you kind of need like a pure tone."

With that pure tone, Rightmire is able to do blues, straight harp, and special effects like spacey electronic sounds. He is even able to make the harmonica sound like a Hammond organ and that a DJ turntablist.

turbineBut this isn't the only kind of versatility the band is able to produce. Hilliard and Rightmire recently surprised a bluegrass audience when they were asked to join the Del McCoury Band on stage. When Hilliard brought up his electric, everyone inwardly winced and he was even challenged by a band member. Hilliard then charmed the audience by producing a slick electric fiddle sound coming from his guitar, while Rightmire offered banjo sounds from his harmonica.

Musical skills like these, however, aren't limited to just the original duo. All of the band members have jazz and/or classical roots. Hilliard studied jazz guitar. Rightmire studied piano and French Horn, then moved to acoustic guitar and harmonica. Kimmel and Nazary are also jazz trained but are extremely versatile, even filling in on a reggae song or a country tune.

This year, Turbine will have a new album out, and will begin touring with a new drummer, Eric Johnson. They also will open festival season with a slot at Wakarusa in Kansas in June. Check out some song samples at www.myspace.com/turbine.

Leftover Salmon Ends Hiatus, Confirms Festival Appearances

Drew Emmitt @ The Fox in Boulder- for the Grateful Web

Colorado-based Leftover Salmon announces it will return to the stage later this year. Confirmed by a statement today from band manager John Joy the return will mark the end to the band's 27-month hiatus.

Following the band's last live performance on New Year's Eve 2004 in Boulder, audiences nationwide will once again hear the trademark polyethnic-cajun-slamgrass sound that propelled the group from its humble Rocky Mountain beginnings to international critical acclaim.

The returning lineup for Leftover Salmon features Vince Herman (acoustic guitar, vocals), Drew Emmitt (mandolin, guitar, vocals), Jeff Sipe (drums), Greg Garrison (bass, vocals), Bill McKay (keyboards, vocals), and Noam Pikelny (banjo).

The confirmed performances have the band making festival appearances on opposite coasts including the High Sierra Music Festival in Northern California and the All Good Music Festival in West Virginia's hills.

Confirmed 2007 Performances:

High Sierra Music Festival - Quincy, CA  2 performances: Saturday, July 7 and Sunday, July 8

All Good Music Festival - Masontown, WV Sunday, July 15

Leftover Salmon was formed by accident in 1989, when a local band, the Salmon Heads, asked members of the Left Hand String Band to fill some missing spots in its lineup.  The synergy worked and the resulting quintet went on to pioneer its own genre.

 

After the independent release of Bridges to Bert in 1993 and the 1995 live follow-up Ask The Fish, Leftover Salmon gained a spot on the H.O.R.D.E. festival tour and a contract with Hollywood Records. Their Hollywood debut and second studio album, Euphoria, continued to define their eclectic sound and introduced many songs that would become classics for the band.

vinceOther releases include The Nashville Sessions (1999) featuring scores of famous Nashville artists and session musicians as collaborators; Live (2002) the first recording with the new rhythm section, O Cracker, Where Art Thou? (2003) featuring Cracker members David Lowery and Johnny Hickman with LS as the backing band, and Leftover Salmon (2004) first studio record since the loss of founding member, banjoist Mark Vann.

Each of the band's releases cements its contemporary sound with the solid genre-bending fusion of newgrass, folk and blues. Through the course of the initial 15 years of Leftover Salmon has performed music with such contemporaries as Sam Bush, Bela Fleck, David Grisman, Jerry Douglas, Del McCoury, Peter Rowan, Pete Wernick, Col. Bruce Hampton, Oteil Burbridge, Bill Payne, Darol Anger, Mike Marshall, Pete Sears, Todd Park Mohr, Tony Furtado, Theresa Anderson, along with members of the The String Cheese Incident, Widespread Panic, Yonder Mountain String Band and dozens of additional artists.

The band continues to break new ground with its highly energetic live performances and initiate new fans with each show.

Official Leftover Salmon website: www.leftoversalmon.com

Unity the band: Bringing the Love

Unity, a seven member reggae band, set the lovin' vibe on opening night at last year's 10,000 Lakes Festival. Touring throughout Wisconsin, they rarely make it west so it was a rare treat to hear this band.

The Bands of 10,000 Lakes, Part 1

With warmer temperatures, jamfans are already looking toward summer festivals. To tempt you further, we're going to take a look back at last year's 10,000 Lakes Festival in Minnesota, the new kid on the festival circuit that is drawing fans to its musical honey and its truly sweet location. We'll show you a bit of what each day was like with a profile of a couple of bands that played there last year. A final installment will give you a glimpse into what to expect this summer.

BUSTLE IN YOUR HEDGEROW

Benevento- for the Grateful Web

On March 1st the on-and-off again Led Zeppelin tribute band, Bustle in Your Hedgerow, brought their high-energy show to the Bluebird Theater on historic Colfax Avenue in Denver.  A handful of fans showed up to hear their favorite Zep tunes, and were rewarded with a musically stunning performance that covered a wide range of the classic rock outfit's catalogue.

This group of jamband all-stars is comprised of the Benevento/Russo Duo on keys and drums, with Dave Dreiwitz of Ween on bass, and Scott Metzger of Particle/RANA on guitar. Formed about three years ago, the members have since set out to reprise, as Marco Benevento stated, the songs of "the greatest band ever".  While they may not exactly sound like the kings of British hard rock, they certainly breathe some new life into some old favorites.

Though I was unable to witness the entire performance, it was exciting to see what some talented musicians could do with some classic Zeppelin songs.  Renditions of "Moby Dick" and "Kashmir" highlighted a fiery first set of covers.  Also, a blues-heavy version of "Dazed and Confused" reminded the audience that Page, Plant, Jones, and Bonham quite possibly were the greatest rock band ever.

The jams on these tunes were very heavy, and for the most part the band was in sync with each other.  Though each member proved their worth, the show benefited the most by the contributions of Metzger's guitar work.  This was the first time I had the opportunity to see him perform live, and he was phenomenal.  His style is less bluesy than that of Jimmy Page, with heavier licks and a modern jam-oriented approach to solos.

scottAs much fun as it was to actually hear a group cover Zeppelin well, the band failed to provide one aspect that made the original so explosive:  vocals.  Whether it was by choice or lack of a good singer, Bustle in Your Hedgerow performed the covers without anyone singing.  Rather, Benevento used his Wurlitzer organ to administer notes where Robert Plant's vocals would be.  And to be honest, it just came out a little cheesy.  I do not doubt his ability to play keys, however it did diminish the overall quality of the songs.  This talented cover band would benefit greatly from having someone worthy on vocals (might I suggest Theryl DeClouet, formerly of Galactic, who would give the lyrics an interesting and very energetic twist).

Obviously, the members have no plans to quit their "day jobs," but do plan to continue showing off their take on vintage Zeppelin ballads.  Speaking with Dreiwitz after set break, he told me that they were "just having a ton of fun playing in a tribute band."  Having fun indeed, as it was evident in the energy with which these guys played.  Any purist Zep fan might say, "What is and what should never be", referencing an early Zeppelin tune to explain that no one should ever cover the iconic rock group.  However, any fan of classic rock should enjoy the smoking instrumental work these guys blanket over such influential pieces.

SCI Welcomes Special Guests for their Annual Winter Carnival

Here in Colorado, the snow has been falling, falling… and falling.  To celebrate the winter white, The String Cheese Incident announces their annual Winter Carnival run of shows, this year confirmed for March 22nd, 23rd, and 24th at Denver's Fillmore Auditorium, and March 26th and 27th at Dobson Ice Arena in Vail.

The Grateful Garcia Gathering in Black River Falls, WI

Welcome Deadheads, Hippies, and kind folks. Come join us as we honor Jerry Garcia with three nights of great music and camping at "Camp NCN" in beautiful Black River Falls, WI. Tickets are on sale now and will be least expensive prior to April 30th so buy early.

*Headlining for Two Nights*

Melvin Seals & JGB

Donna Jean and The Tricksters

Moonalice

Boris Garcia

Skatalites: Inventors of a Genre

Deep in the heart of Chinatown lies a dark and gothic like cave we in Philadelphia like to call the Trocadero. This particular venue holds a nostalgic memory for me.  It wasn't since the early 90's (when I was in high school and went to see Anthrax at this venue) that I had the opportunity to see a show here. It's a great venue. On the other hand, the atmosphere at the Troc tonight had a whole different feel to it. It was light and bright with Rasta sounds and swingin' ska fans.