Albums

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Kurt Vile | Wakin On A Pretty Daze | New Music Review

Submitted by John Mosley on Tue, 04/02/2013 - 2:40 pm

Kurt Vile's fifth long player is a humble opus if there’s such a thing. His lyrics could be hopeful, could be melancholy, it’s tough to tell – the almost-eponymous opening track (substitute “Day” for Daze in the title) sums it simply, it’s hard to explain, (my love) in this daze. Vile’s vocals throughout Wakin On A Pretty Daze are soft and flatline, yet they tend to hint at a humble crispness around the edges. As warning, his melodies keep alongside his voice, slow and meandering with only the slightest deviance.

TAUK | Homunculus | New Music Review

Submitted by John Mosley on Mon, 04/01/2013 - 12:08 pm

With TAUK, it's best to ignore the foursome's wordy pandering (We really wanted this new album to be a statement... Homunculus has everything to do with how we as humans interpret ourselves and our surroundings. It acknowledges the inherent duality that exists between our mental and physical beings and to me that's where it relates to our creative process... Cool, Zhongfeng, now enough with the koans, please) and just listen to the music. Yes, these fellows are formally trained one-and-all.

The Gypsy Sons | Whiskey and the Devil | Review

Submitted by Cyrus Rhodes on Fri, 03/22/2013 - 12:17 pm

Hailing from Virginia, The Gypsy Sons' debut album Whiskey and the Devil is a thunderous declaration of intent from this new outfit. The ten song collection, released through Spectra Records on May 7, benefits from gritty production that captures the considerable crunch of the band's live sound while still providing the listener with a thoroughly professional product. This is not rock and roll intent on refashioning the wheel.

Jefferson | All the Love in the World | Review

Submitted by Janne Zawa on Mon, 03/18/2013 - 3:51 pm

Coming this May from Spectra Records, Australian four piece Jefferson's debut album All the Love in the World benefits from strong production. It surrounds the collection with a powerful modern sheen while retaining a breathing, organic sound. Geoff Rana's vocals remind me of a younger, Girlfriend-era Matthew Sweet's singing and the band demonstrates tremendous chemistry for an unit that has been playing together for three years.

David Bowie | The Next Day | Review

Submitted by Jason Chiu on Thu, 03/14/2013 - 3:54 pm

David Bowie is back. Just reading that sentence elicits squeals of glee from fans young and old. He didn’t have to make any new music, really. Bowie’s legacy has been sealed ever since the 70s, and any new music is just icing on the cake. After 2003’s Reality and a terrifying stage collapse in 2004, it looked like Bowie was done with music, but then he came back when we least expected it. We didn’t need this, but we got it anyway.