Grateful Dead

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Of all the many approaching Bay Area rock anniversaries, few can rival The Last Waltz of November 25, 1976.  Between the evening itself – the SF Opera’s set from La Traviata, the incredible range of guests, and The Band itself -- and Martin Scorsese’s epic film, it was simply one of the great music history moments ever.  This Thanksgiving will mark the 40th anniversary...

The Grateful Dead took the stage in the early morning, Sunday, Labor Day weekend in 1982. It was billed as “Breakfast in Bed with the Grateful Dead”. There were over 100,000 already in attendance. The band ended the show with “Satisfaction”. This was The US Festival.

In honor of 50th anniversary of the Grateful Dead's first single, we're excited to announce a brand new highly-collectible 7” vinyl series and a subscription to that series, to boot. 2017 will bring pressings of the first four of the band’s 27 singles on 7-inch colored vinyl, each limited to 10,000 copies and available exclusively at dead.net. The remaining 23 singles will be released over the next few years.

40 years to the day of The Last Waltz, happening in the same city - just across town, Jackie Greene brings the magic of musical friendship to life.  Greene welcomes a handful of special guests to the stage with his band at The Warfield in San Francisco on Saturday, November 26.

In a surprisingly absent addition to the Jerry Garcia canon, Round Records/ATO Records are releasing the earliest known recording from the beloved multi-instrumentalist on November 11th. Three years before Garcia cofounded the American Psychedelic Rock group the Grateful Dead, the twenty-year old was exploring the American folk and roots music tradition. He had learned to play guitar and banjo in his teens and was beginning to refine his skill set as a self-taught multi-instrumentalist.

Few musicians completely transcend cultural barriers while keeping their craft authentic to their origins. One of the few percussionists to achieve this feat in the 20th century is tabla legend Zakir Hussain. Traditionally in Indian culture, one carries on their family’s craft. Zakir is son of iconic table master Alla Rakha, who frequently collaborated with Ravi Shankar. Both masters were pivotal in exposing the music of North India to the Americas.

Who's ready for a little early 80's Grateful Dead? For our last installment of the 2016 Dave's Picks series we are heeding that call with Boulder, CO, December 9, 1981. The last show of a 10-day run, Dave's Picks Volume 20 finds the band cranking out back-to-back high-energy sets; the first filled with superior Jerry moments ("Friend Of The Devil," "Bird Song") and a very rare 1-2 punch of Bobby songs ("Cassidy," "Looks Like Rain").

Grateful Web recently had the opportunity to speak with photo anthropologist Susana Millman. Longtime spouse of the Grateful Dead’s historian and publicist Dennis McNally, Susana began her friendship with and photographing the Grateful Dead in the mid-1980s. Her unique vantage as a true insider granted her access to photograph behind the scenes intimately with the band, their family, their friends, and the Deadheads.

The Avett Brothers have released a video and a sneak peak of songs to be performed for their extraordinary upcoming concert event Dear Jerry: This Is 30! featuring special guest Warren Haynesone of two concerts honoring the music of Jerry Garcia coming to the DC/VA/MD area on October 14 and 15.