Dawes

With just a few weeks until the gates open at the Newport Folk Festival, I find myself thinking about little else, at least musically. I go to a number of festivals and see a lot of shows, but it’s rare that a musical event can rob my attention well before it happens. It’s difficult to describe the festival to those who haven’t been; like anything magical, you really need to experience it for yourself to fully understand why it sells out instantly, without the fanfare of announcements and advertisements. In fact, the last ticket is sold long before the first artist is announced.

Illustrious musicians from the vanguard to the nostalgic, some of who began plying their craft in the ‘60s, and others who are poised for big recognition in the 2020s, all shared a distinctive Southern California seaside aesthetic at the inaugural BeachLife Festival May 3 to 5. BeachLife, the biggest fest ever to blast its jukebox along the Santa Monica Bay at Redondo Beach, combined sun, sounds, sand, and surf and passed its acid test with flying colors.

97.3 KBCO (iHeartMedia-Denver) and Breckenridge Brewery are proud to announce details for On Tap with KBCO Live Music at Breckenridge Brewery. The charity concert series presents the co-headlining bill Dawes and Moon Taxi on August 10, 2019 at Breckenridge Brewery in Littleton, CO. Ticket proceeds benefit Take Note Colorado, which is a statewide initiative to provide access to musical instruments & instruction to every K-12 student in Colorado.

The BeachLife Festival, Los Angeles’ first oceanfront multi-day festival event, just keeps getting better! BeachLife is proud to announce the addition of Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Jason Mraz, Southern California reggae-rock favorites Slightly Stoopid, indie-folk trailblazers Dawes, easy-going jam-rockers Big Head Todd and The Monsters, plus reggae rising stars Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds, and tropical songstress Anuhea, to accompany the already stacked lineup of artists performing the weekend of May 3-5, 2019.

Nestled in 150 acres of farmland surrounded by the Manistee National Forest, Hoxeyville Music Festival is a testament to pure north country peace and celebration.

Dawes has come home. After recording its last two albums, Stories Don’t End and All Your Favorite Bands, in Asheville, North Carolina, and Nashville, respectively, the Los Angeles band has returned to the city that has been both home and inspiration since its inception in 2009 to record its fifth album, We’re All Gonna Die, with longtime friend and Grammy-nominated producer Blake Mills at the helm.

HeadCount, a non-partisan, non-profit organization that stages voter registration drives at concerts, announced that it is throwing a pair of invitation-only music events at the Presidential nominating conventions.

Billboard and GRAMMYs on the HIll® are the lead sponsors of the events.

In Cleveland on July 18th at the House of Blues, Nashville-TN based Moon Taxi will perform at the “HeadCount Convention Jam,” on the first scheduled day of the Republican National Convention.

The revival of the venerable Newport Folk Festival continued with a very strong roster of artists this year that expanded once again the boundaries of what is “folk music.” Folk purists – the kind of people who booed Dylan when he went electric at the 1965 festival (this year was the 50th anniversary of that iconic set) – would probably have seen their heads explode if they caught My Morning Jacket’s surprise set on first night of this year’s gathering.

LA rock quartet Dawes took to the Ed Sullivan Theater at the request of David Letterman himself Wednesday, April 22, to perform "Things Happen," the first single off their highly anticipated forthcoming full-length album titled All Your Favorite Bands (HUB Records, Tuesday, June 2).

The Newport Folk Festival may not be a monster fest on the order of a Bonnaroo or a Coachella, but it has rejuvenated itself over the last half dozen years into a premier summer stop for a broad range of alternative, indie, country-rock and folk acts. Much of the rejuvenation has been the result of a conscious decision by festival organizers to loosen the definition of “folk” to include a much wider swath of bands – really anybody who could plausibly include an acoustic guitar at least somewhere in their set list.

Archived news