Ron "Pigpen" McKernan

Today, Sanuk announced a collaboration with iconic rock band, Grateful Dead. Launching on 4/20, the exclusive collection for men and women celebrates the legacy of arguably one of the greatest bands of all time – with tie-dye colors of course!

Who's up for a revolutionary evolutionary ride? DAVE'S PICKS VOLUME 30: FILLMORE EAST, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 1/2/70 captures the Grateful Dead as they make their first foray from the experimental 60s into their early 70s acoustic Americana period. Yes, this one is a little bit country and a little bit (psychedelic) rock and roll.

“In 1969, for their third album, the Grateful Dead eschewed outside producers and created Aoxomoxoa themselves, beginning a run of self-produced albums that would continue until 1977. Scrapping the first sessions, which were recorded to eight-track tape, the Dead now had 16 tracks with which to experiment their psychedelic sound, with an album that included entirely Robert Hunter-penned lyrics for the first time.” - Archivist David Lemieux

I get asked a lot about the current crop of young (as in, never saw Jerry Garcia live) Dead Heads and whether they’re “real.”  And no question, they are.  They get the music, the code of ethics behind the music, the reason we do this stuff.  There is, however, one thing that reveals the passage of time.  Many—not all, but quite a few—members of the younger generation suffer from P.D. – Pigpen Deficiency.

“This is one the most thrilling albums the Grateful Dead ever produced, mixing portions of live recordings from the first six months of Mickey's tenure with the band, along with studio experimentations that would hint at where the Dead would go when they started recording to 16-track tape the following year. The 1971 remix, produced in order to make the album more accessible to the newer fans who were brought on board with WORKINGMAN'S DEAD and AMERICAN BEAUTY, has been the most commonly heard version for the past 45+ years.

Studio album purists might have a sound argument when it comes to certain rock acts, but few Deadheads would ever argue that the quality of the Grateful Dead's studio work superseded their live recordings. Most of their studio albums we’re muddled down by the likes of Warner Brothers, big time L.A. record executives that wanted a four minute track, or just poor planning and execution. Only the Terrapin Station studio suite superseded its live performance.

Grateful Web recently had an opportunity to speak to musician, songwriter and music journalist, David Gans.  David is the host of the weekly syndicated radio show The Grateful Dead Hour, co-authored the book Playing in the Band: An Oral and Visual Portrait of the Grateful Dead and this weekend David is preparing for the annual Berkeley based KPFA Dead Marathon, whi

When the Grateful Dead left Warner Bros. to form their own label in 1973, after six years and eight albums, they delivered their first live "best-of" anthology, HISTORY OF THE GRATEFUL DEAD VOL. 1 (BEAR'S CHOICE). The album, which will be reissued by Audio Fidelity on July 10 on 180-gram virgin vinyl, documents the band's February 13-14, 1970 stand at New York's Fillmore East as recorded by Dead sound manager (and creator of 'Owsley' LSD) Owsley "Bear" Stanley.

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