Reviews

Few iconic bands who have been a group for fifty years truly play with the vigor and focus of their heyday. Not that there’s anything erroneous regarding nostalgia, but for the seminal group King Crimson there’s historically been little looking back. Denying the moniker of progressive rock (reasonably so, as they predate the subgenre) the group’s core founding member Robert Fripp (guitars, keyboards, mellotron) generally led a charge towards new material every tour and an evolving methodology on arrangements.

Joe Russo’s Almost Dead took over Red Rocks Park and Amphitheatre last Thursday, August 29th, igniting a monumental weekend of music throughout the Greater Denver Area. Attendees began their night socializing and connecting to fellow Deadheads in the lots, as others had their finger up looking for their miracles for this legendary sold-out show at Red Rocks.

Achilles Wheel, which has been carving an ever-widening circle of fan appreciation over the past eight years, is working on a new live recording project, the second session of which was a real humdinger in their idyllic, rustic hometown of Nevada City, Calif., on August 21.

Flume took the stage at 9:45 p.m., igniting with hard-hitting electronic waves as he whipped out a pink can of spray paint, spelling out “Hi this is Flume” holding it up the screaming crowd. A melodic beat came on, as Flume welcomed collaborator slowthai onstage in his underwear for a electronic-hip hop collaboration off his newest mixtape release, Hi This Is Flume (Mixtape).

What is fair to say and what is hyperbole? Is it overstating things to say the Grateful Dead have become so much more than just their music? They define pieces of us. Times with friends. Discovery. They have become an institution reaching further than just recordings of their shows. But no matter what, for all of us, it still starts there; with the music. The music was and is a driving force in us. But since it has ended, and it has ended, what we are left with are new branches growing from roots sewn in the 60’s.

Located in the heart of the Old Town district of Fort Collins Colorado sits the city’s second-largest venue, the Aggie Theatre. Constructed in the early 1900s, the space originally was a furniture store before becoming a moviehouse and then morphed into a music venue in the 1990s. Since then, its use as a musical site for both local and national acts has earned a reputation as a favorite spot for the younger crowd and the often related weekend debauchery that follows.

On a gorgeous summer Sunday evening, July 28th, a small army of Prog Rock legends played the final concert of their Royal Affair Tour at the Saratoga Mountain Winery. The venue is an intimate amphitheater which sits on top of a mountain offering a spectacular view of the valley below. Surrounded by a vineyard, the location is drenched in California winemaking history. The Mountain Winery, formerly known as the Paul Masson Mountain Winery, is a fully functioning winery in Saratoga, California.

Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, where does someone start? This funk, soul powerhouse brings the ruckus with so much elegance and class. Wednesday night in Jersey City they did just that and then some. The White Eagle Hall was in for a mid-week high energy old school get down right from the get-go. Slightly Stoopid opened tonight setting the tone for Karl Denson to come out for a dueling sax solo to end the rock steady set!

“Ooh. Lake Street Dive. I like them.” An off-handed comment from a friend with musical taste a few degrees away from mine planted the seed that finally bloomed in all its glory last night. Isn’t it funny how much we shape our thoughts about a band based on the personality of those who describe a band to us? You see, Erin, who likes Lake Street Dive, would never be caught dead at a Phish show. She may see Dead and Company, and maybe even saw the Dead proper, growing up in California.