Grateful Dead

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By fall of 1994 the Grateful Dead scene was growing unmanageably large. Even large mainstay venues that the boys have been performing at for decades were too small anymore. The performance that used to be a not-so well-kept secret had grown to sell out the largest football and soccer stadiums.

Specific aromas have the power to transport me back to an earlier, more youthful time: the earthy redolence of decaying leaves, mesquite smoke wafting from a neighbor’s barbeque, and even the gamy stench of a hockey locker room. I also have triggers for my ocular, haptic, gustatory, and aural senses. All of us do. And I thought sensory recall was the closest thing I would ever have to a time machine. But on Friday night, Phil and Friends changed that – not once, but twice.

Three time Grammy winner Mickey Hart announces his new studio album and tour.  Hart's new album entitled Mysterium Tremendum, his first in five years, follows the 2007 Grammy award winning Global Drum Project. Mysterium Tremendum is set for release on April 12, 2012.

The Rex Foundation is pleased to announce that tickets are now on sale for the Rex Benefit The Wheel - A Musical Celebration of Jerry Garcia, taking place on Saturday, March 24th at the The Hamilton in downtown Washington, DC, featuring New Riders of the Purple Sage, Jesse McReynolds with Garret McReynolds and Steve Thomas, and 

On April 17 the Grateful Dead will be celebrated with a 14-DVD box set titled All The Years Combine: The DVD Collection, to be released by Shout! Factory in collaboration with Rhino Entertainment. Conceived as the ultimate tribute to the band’s legendary on-stage prowess, the set includes 12 concert films; a 40-page booklet containing rare photos and new liner notes by Blair Jackson; and all bonus features from previous releases of the DVDs in the set.

Some of you asked us to bring the highly regarded December 2010 Benefit The Wheel - A Musical Celebration of Jerry Garcia to the East Coast.  We are pleased to say this is happening!

If you are a Deadhead living in SFO, PDX, PHL, BWI, or NYC, I need to talk to you about time and energy. But not in the “How do you get to Carnegie Hall?” tradition of “Practice, Practice, Practice”. Instead, I need to talk to you about the temporal evolution and aggregate electrical output that are quickly molding The Motet’s funkified adaptations of the Grateful Dead songbook into an instant must-see classic.

Chances are if you’re a Dead Head you’re already well-versed in the glorious spring of 1977. Back a year since their mid-’70s performing hiatus, and fresh from recording their Terrapin Station album in L.A. with producer Keith Olsen, the Dead returned to the road invigorated and excited that spring. There were fantastic new songs (including the “Terrapin Station” suite, “Estimated Prophet” and “Fire on the Mountain”) and their older tunes seemed imbued with new vigor and vitality.

With the release of his fifth album, Jackie Greene said in an interview that he was tired of being labeled as the “new Dylan.” Now almost four years later with another record under his belt, Greene’s live performance has placed him in a realm outside of the more simple acoustic guitar and harmonica playing solo artist that gave Greene his start.

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